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    • DonPatch
    • By DonPatch 8th Mar 18, 8:02 PM
    • 24Posts
    • 10Thanks
    DonPatch
    Pension investment Choices
    • #1
    • 8th Mar 18, 8:02 PM
    Pension investment Choices 8th Mar 18 at 8:02 PM
    Hi

    I am 41 and have a stakeholder pension with Aviva since December 2004. I am self employed.

    In that time with tax relief contributions have equaled 38694 and the pension is worth 52697.

    I am currently paying 298 with tax relief. It goes up each year with the index.

    The money is in Aviva Funds mixed investments 40-85% shares. Level 3 out of 5 for risk.
    It is also in Aviva Pensions stakeholder with profit (default) fund. Level 2 for risk.

    I can't see any charges listed for pension administration.

    I have two questions.

    1 is the pension doing well or should it be performing better?

    2. Should the money be in riskier funds and if so, how would someone who is not very knowledgeable on this choose where to invest? Or should I leave as is?

    Can anyone give a little guidance please?
Page 1
    • dunstonh
    • By dunstonh 9th Mar 18, 1:12 AM
    • 92,574 Posts
    • 59,878 Thanks
    dunstonh
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:12 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:12 AM
    1 is the pension doing well or should it be performing better?
    its a middle of the road fund giving middle of the road returns in a middle of the road contract.

    2. Should the money be in riskier funds and if so, how would someone who is not very knowledgeable on this choose where to invest? Or should I leave as is?
    Your value is low for a 41 year old and your contribution is low. Can you afford to take risks?
    I am an Independent Financial Adviser (IFA). Comments are for discussion purposes only. They are not financial advice. If you feel an area discussed may be relevant to you, then please seek advice from an Independent Financial Adviser local to you.
    • Brynsam
    • By Brynsam 9th Mar 18, 1:14 AM
    • 919 Posts
    • 604 Thanks
    Brynsam
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:14 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:14 AM
    You need to be clear on charges. If you can't find them, ask Aviva to confirm.

    Each fund you are invested in will have an objective, which will be clearly set out - again, ask Aviva for the relevant factsheet if you can't find it. If the fund is meeting or exceeding its objective, then it is doing what it should be doing.

    Whether the money should be in riskier funds depends entirely on your attitude to risk. If you are fundamentally uncomfortable about your pension fund fluctuating heavily in value, no amount of 'should' or 'ought to' will help you to sleep at night. But at 41, you have many years in which the fund could regain ground, so it is well worth considering putting some of your fund into 'riskier' investments. Aviva's website will outline what is on offer - have a look at the fund objectives and see which you feel comfortable with.

    There isn't a right or wrong answer, unless of course you have the proverbial crystal ball....
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