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  • FIRST POST
    • Tiggy14
    • By Tiggy14 8th Mar 18, 2:54 PM
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    Tiggy14
    Disciplinary Investigation
    • #1
    • 8th Mar 18, 2:54 PM
    Disciplinary Investigation 8th Mar 18 at 2:54 PM
    Can someone who is the accused in a disciplinary hearing refuse to sign their investigation meeting notes if the notes are presented to them for signing after the meeting. I am not saying straight after the meeting but say a week later?

    Thanks
Page 1
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 8th Mar 18, 3:01 PM
    • 1,586 Posts
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    BorisThomson
    • #2
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:01 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:01 PM
    No one can force you to sign anything. The investigating officer would be free to note that you refused to sign, and conclusions may (or may not) be drawn from that.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 8th Mar 18, 3:02 PM
    • 2,970 Posts
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    Comms69
    • #3
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:02 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:02 PM
    Can someone who is the accused in a disciplinary hearing refuse to sign their investigation meeting notes if the notes are presented to them for signing after the meeting. I am not saying straight after the meeting but say a week later?

    Thanks
    Originally posted by Tiggy14
    Yes, but it makes no difference. The investigating officer simply writes refused to sign.
    • Tiggy14
    • By Tiggy14 8th Mar 18, 3:08 PM
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    Tiggy14
    • #4
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:08 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:08 PM
    How would somebody be expected to recall that their notes are as presented a week after the investigation meeting? Is it best practice to request they are signed ASAP after the meeting?
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 8th Mar 18, 3:11 PM
    • 1,586 Posts
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    BorisThomson
    • #5
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:11 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:11 PM
    How would somebody be expected to recall that their notes are as presented a week after the investigation meeting? Is it best practice to request they are signed ASAP after the meeting?
    Originally posted by Tiggy14
    Best practice is not to put yourself in a position to be on a disciplinary!

    You can request whatever you want to. It won't make any difference.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 8th Mar 18, 3:12 PM
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    Comms69
    • #6
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:12 PM
    • #6
    • 8th Mar 18, 3:12 PM
    How would somebody be expected to recall that their notes are as presented a week after the investigation meeting? Is it best practice to request they are signed ASAP after the meeting?
    Originally posted by Tiggy14

    Not necessarily. I would think it quite reasonable to recollect what was said a week ago at an investigatory meeting. Surely you were paying attention!


    What you could do is highlight where you do not agree and ask for that to be noted.


    Notes and minutes are often not ready for several days
    • Tiggy14
    • By Tiggy14 8th Mar 18, 4:01 PM
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    Tiggy14
    • #7
    • 8th Mar 18, 4:01 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Mar 18, 4:01 PM
    Thanks for the info, with regards to the investigator should this in best practice be somebody without any previous involvement? I understand if the company is small this might not work but would it be adviseable for someone unconnected to investigate for a company with 1,000 employees
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 8th Mar 18, 4:05 PM
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    Comms69
    • #8
    • 8th Mar 18, 4:05 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Mar 18, 4:05 PM
    Thanks for the info, with regards to the investigator should this in best practice be somebody without any previous involvement? I understand if the company is small this might not work but would it be adviseable for someone unconnected to investigate for a company with 1,000 employees
    Originally posted by Tiggy14


    It's not a requirement, so it's up to the employer.


    Yes it's advisable, but only to protect the employer from any future claims.


    Perhaps you can share what you did or didn't do, what has happened so far, and how long you've worked there?
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 8th Mar 18, 7:20 PM
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    ohreally
    • #9
    • 8th Mar 18, 7:20 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Mar 18, 7:20 PM
    Thanks for the info, with regards to the investigator should this in best practice be somebody without any previous involvement?
    Originally posted by Tiggy14
    I'd be concerned if the investigation officer became judge, jury and executioner.

    Why not set out your stall and explain the circumstances?
    • Always Alba
    • By Always Alba 8th Mar 18, 7:39 PM
    • 14 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    Always Alba
    Have you had a copy of the companies disciplinary procedure?. If not, get a copy asap and check the correct procedure is being followed.
    You can also get advice from the ACAS website.

    Re the notes, do you feel they reflect that you were able to explain your side and / or version of events?. As previous, if you think something is wrong, you should ask for a correction note or addition to be made. However, if you simply refuse to sign because you can't remember, this will not help your case.

    If you want to keep your job then cooperation can be seen in a good light.

    More advice can be given if you can provide further details (as mentioned by a former poster)
    • Detroit
    • By Detroit 8th Mar 18, 7:40 PM
    • 747 Posts
    • 2,332 Thanks
    Detroit
    How would somebody be expected to recall that their notes are as presented a week after the investigation meeting? Is it best practice to request they are signed ASAP after the meeting?
    Originally posted by Tiggy14
    Is a good idea for you, or the person accompanying you, to take their own notes. I realize this may not be helpful after the event, but for future reference.

    In these circumstances, you would be looking to ensure the notes of what you said were an accurate reflection of your responses to the investigators questions.

    Any discrepancies should be fairly obvious as you would be likely to remember how you responded to the questions, provided you gave a truthful account.


    Put your hands up.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 9th Mar 18, 9:47 AM
    • 6,610 Posts
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    ohreally
    Is a good idea for you, or the person accompanying you, to take their own notes.
    Originally posted by Detroit
    The is no statutory right to be accompanied at an investigation hearing.
    • Detroit
    • By Detroit 9th Mar 18, 7:21 PM
    • 747 Posts
    • 2,332 Thanks
    Detroit
    The is no statutory right to be accompanied at an investigation hearing.
    Originally posted by ohreally
    No indeed. However it is sometimes permitted.


    Put your hands up.
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