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  • FIRST POST
    • thor
    • By thor 8th Mar 18, 1:15 PM
    • 5,232Posts
    • 1,879Thanks
    thor
    LED lightbulb has begun to not work properly
    • #1
    • 8th Mar 18, 1:15 PM
    LED lightbulb has begun to not work properly 8th Mar 18 at 1:15 PM
    I have a normal ceiling LED bulb which has been working fine for over a year until yesterday. Now it refuses to turn off. When I switch it off, the bulb just flickers. When it is on it behaves perfectly emitting the correct amount of light with no flicker.
    Suspecting the bulb, I replaced it with another led bulb but that exhibited the same behavior, it too just flickers when I try to turn it off. Next I tried an old fashioned Incandescent bulb and found that it works as it should do and so have left it in.
    So I was hoping someone might have ideas about what the problem could be. I don't have a dimmer switch so I can rule out the LED incompatibly issues(especially as it has been working properly for over a year). Could it be that the switch itself might be faulty and that LED bulbs are more sensitive to it than incandescent bulbs?
Page 1
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 8th Mar 18, 1:35 PM
    • 1,883 Posts
    • 2,517 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #2
    • 8th Mar 18, 1:35 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Mar 18, 1:35 PM
    It does sound as if there's something amiss with the wiring, fitting or switch, causing a small amount of current to pass when the switch is off. Just enough to power an LED but not enough for a traditional bulb?
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • missile
    • By missile 8th Mar 18, 1:36 PM
    • 9,443 Posts
    • 4,698 Thanks
    missile
    • #3
    • 8th Mar 18, 1:36 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Mar 18, 1:36 PM
    It is the switch or possibly defective wiring. If the switch were working correctly there would be no power getting to the bulb.
    "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Ride hard or stay home
    • thor
    • By thor 9th Mar 18, 1:33 AM
    • 5,232 Posts
    • 1,879 Thanks
    thor
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:33 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Mar 18, 1:33 AM
    Maybe it is the switch as it is a moving part which I suppose could become defective. I've had a look at the cabling and it looks sound so I'll probably buy a replacement and see how that goes.
    • Aylesbury Duck
    • By Aylesbury Duck 9th Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    • 1,883 Posts
    • 2,517 Thanks
    Aylesbury Duck
    • #5
    • 9th Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    Whilst you've got the power off to replace the switch, take the opportunity to inspect the fitting and its connections. Over time and through heat, fittings can become brittle, as can old wiring. You might have a loose connection or a bridge between two wires that have partially lost their insulation. Something is completing the circuit intermittently.
    Please forgive the deliberate omission of apostrophes on some posts whilst I await MSE to do something about the daft codes that appear in their place when typing on certain devices.
    • shaun from Africa
    • By shaun from Africa 9th Mar 18, 11:40 AM
    • 9,974 Posts
    • 11,246 Thanks
    shaun from Africa
    • #6
    • 9th Mar 18, 11:40 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Mar 18, 11:40 AM
    If/when you check the switch and wiring, it would be a good idea to turn off all the power in your house and not just the lighting circuit.

    If there is damaged wiring somewhere and the cables to the light fitting are picking up power from elsewhere, you could possibly still get a shock despite the lighting circuit being made safe.
    • missile
    • By missile 9th Mar 18, 3:37 PM
    • 9,443 Posts
    • 4,698 Thanks
    missile
    • #7
    • 9th Mar 18, 3:37 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Mar 18, 3:37 PM
    Maybe it is the switch as it is a moving part which I suppose could become defective. I've had a look at the cabling and it looks sound so I'll probably buy a replacement and see how that goes.
    Originally posted by thor
    Maybe you can use your hammer? .
    "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Ride hard or stay home
    • brightontraveller
    • By brightontraveller 9th Mar 18, 4:14 PM
    • 1,352 Posts
    • 526 Thanks
    brightontraveller
    • #8
    • 9th Mar 18, 4:14 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Mar 18, 4:14 PM
    I have a normal ceiling LED bulb which has been working fine for over a year until yesterday. Now it refuses to turn off. When I switch it off, the bulb just flickers. When it is on it behaves perfectly emitting the correct amount of light with no flicker.
    Suspecting the bulb, I replaced it with another led bulb but that exhibited the same behavior, it too just flickers when I try to turn it off. Next I tried an old fashioned Incandescent bulb and found that it works as it should do and so have left it in.
    So I was hoping someone might have ideas about what the problem could be. I don't have a dimmer switch so I can rule out the LED incompatibly issues(especially as it has been working properly for over a year). Could it be that the switch itself might be faulty and that LED bulbs are more sensitive to it than incandescent bulbs?
    Originally posted by thor
    I'd go with"final circuit cable capacitance";
    (more common in two way and intermediate switching) LED"s require very little current to drive the lamp hence glow, flicker etc Some remedies add a snubber (100% works) , change all or some of the lamps for different make, (50% of the time will rectify ) replace switching (50% of the time will rectify )for different make, add GLS filament lamp to the circuit, Very much doubt its wiring etc
    Last edited by brightontraveller; 09-03-2018 at 4:23 PM.
    • Risteard
    • By Risteard 9th Mar 18, 5:25 PM
    • 783 Posts
    • 273 Thanks
    Risteard
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 18, 5:25 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Mar 18, 5:25 PM
    I'd go with"final circuit cable capacitance";
    (more common in two way and intermediate switching) LED"s require very little current to drive the lamp hence glow, flicker etc Some remedies add a snubber (100% works) , change all or some of the lamps for different make, (50% of the time will rectify ) replace switching (50% of the time will rectify )for different make, add GLS filament lamp to the circuit, Very much doubt its wiring etc
    Originally posted by brightontraveller
    I would agree with that analysis.
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 9th Mar 18, 7:07 PM
    • 4,996 Posts
    • 5,559 Thanks
    Keep pedalling
    I'd go with"final circuit cable capacitance";
    (more common in two way and intermediate switching) LED"s require very little current to drive the lamp hence glow, flicker etc Some remedies add a snubber (100% works) , change all or some of the lamps for different make, (50% of the time will rectify ) replace switching (50% of the time will rectify )for different make, add GLS filament lamp to the circuit, Very much doubt its wiring etc
    Originally posted by brightontraveller
    If that was the problem I would have thought the issue would occur from day one not start over a year after fitting the first led bulb
    • brightontraveller
    • By brightontraveller 9th Mar 18, 7:57 PM
    • 1,352 Posts
    • 526 Thanks
    brightontraveller
    If that was the problem I would have thought the issue would occur from day one not start over a year after fitting the first led bulb
    Originally posted by Keep pedalling
    The answer is really if you understand why, causes etc for a more in depth technical answer etc just google it...

    If you lack the knowledge certainly your thought would seam logical, As you don't need to know electrical properties, characteristics of components etc to install them its only really if something is wrong or seams so it can it be handy...
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