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  • FIRST POST
    • Fused
    • By Fused 7th Mar 18, 4:25 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Fused
    Employer annoyed about LinkedIn status
    • #1
    • 7th Mar 18, 4:25 PM
    Employer annoyed about LinkedIn status 7th Mar 18 at 4:25 PM
    Hi

    I'm hoping someone can help me. Back in 2016 I attended a weekend course for property investing.

    The person providing the training suggested a good way of networking with other property investors would be to update social media, to let our contacts know we were involved in property.

    I updated my linkedin profile to suggest this, although I didn't set up a business, it was purely for networking.

    My employer has now brought this to light, suggesting that I'm running a business without their knowledge. I have explained that I am not partaking in any business, I've not made any investments (due to finanacial reasons). They are saying they do not believe me, as my Linkedin status suggests I'm employed by them and another company.

    Are they able to use this information against me? I'm concerned I may lose my job because of this and I am totally innocent, all I did was add some information to Linkedin.
Page 1
    • lisyloo
    • By lisyloo 7th Mar 18, 4:51 PM
    • 21,832 Posts
    • 10,546 Thanks
    lisyloo
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 4:51 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 4:51 PM
    How long have you been in the job?
    This is critical.

    to let our contacts know we were involved in property
    But you are not "involved" in property are you?
    On the face of what you've said, it sounds like your linked in profile does mis-represent you as "involved" when you are not.

    What exactly does the information say about your level of involvement?
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 7th Mar 18, 4:58 PM
    • 6,487 Posts
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    TBagpuss
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 4:58 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 4:58 PM
    Yes, they can use it against you. If they have reasonable grounds to think that you are working a second job that could be a disciplinary issue and could certainly be an issue for you if you were to look for a promotion etc, if the impression they have of you is that you are not fully committed or if they feel that you don't fit the ethos of their business.

    The sensible thing to do would be to either amend what you have on linked in, to make it clearer that you are a private investor in property, or to remove it altogether.

    I would also suggest that you explain to your employer why you added the information and let them know that you are willing to remove or change the information so it is less confusing.

    From their perspective, they have a legitimate concern that you may have a second job, which may be in breach of your terms of employment and which (if you work full time) would raise legitimate concerns about whether you are doing a side job on the clock.

    They may also have concerns that it could give their customers or clients the wrong impression if they check your listing.

    Linked in is primarily marketed and perceived as a professional network rather than a social one - I'm sceptical as to how useful it would be to you in any event of you are not working in that sector, but if you feel that social media would be helpful then I'd suggest that you look accounts which are wholly separate from your job or professional role, - look at twitter, forums or sites dedicated to investors /. property investment etc.

    Also, consider what, if any, benefits you have had from having the information on our profile? What, specifically, were you hoping to get from it? I can see that networking is important if you *are* working and looking for clients, but much less so if you are simply interested in investing privately.
    • stator
    • By stator 7th Mar 18, 5:14 PM
    • 6,220 Posts
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    stator
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 5:14 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 5:14 PM
    Quote the exact text you put on Linked-In
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • Fused
    • By Fused 7th Mar 18, 5:24 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Fused
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 5:24 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 5:24 PM
    I have explained why the information was there and since removed it. It had been there for nearly 2 years and had forgotten about it.
    The status said 'looking to network with likeminded property investors having completed my Progressive training' I wish I hadn't put it on there now, I didn't realise it would cause such confusion
    • z1a
    • By z1a 7th Mar 18, 6:10 PM
    • 1,252 Posts
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    z1a
    • #6
    • 7th Mar 18, 6:10 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Mar 18, 6:10 PM
    I would think that people only join L/I when they're hoping for a better job, maybe that's what your employer thinks.
    • Fused
    • By Fused 7th Mar 18, 7:36 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Fused
    • #7
    • 7th Mar 18, 7:36 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Mar 18, 7:36 PM
    I've been on Linkedin for years and not for the purpose of looking for a different job. I've always used it for networking.
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 7th Mar 18, 7:42 PM
    • 1,586 Posts
    • 3,419 Thanks
    BorisThomson
    • #8
    • 7th Mar 18, 7:42 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Mar 18, 7:42 PM
    I've been on Linkedin for years and not for the purpose of looking for a different job. I've always used it for networking.
    Originally posted by Fused
    Networking for what purpose?
    • Fused
    • By Fused 7th Mar 18, 7:50 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Fused
    • #9
    • 7th Mar 18, 7:50 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Mar 18, 7:50 PM
    Networking for work. I work in marketing and PR so networking is key to my role
    • 74jax
    • By 74jax 7th Mar 18, 7:50 PM
    • 4,673 Posts
    • 6,371 Thanks
    74jax
    I use LinkedIn to keep in touch with past work colleagues, I am extremely secretive with my FB and work is kept totally off FB.

    I received an award at work and added this to my LinkedIn profile. My director called me in his office the very next day. Someone had told him I'd added it and he asked me if I was I looking to move on.

    The move never entered my head, but did make me think this is perhaps what the majority use it for.

    My company is quite high profile on there and posts daily, I use to keep to date with my industry and find it very interesting.
    Forty and fabulous, well that's what my cards say....
    • Energize
    • By Energize 7th Mar 18, 8:40 PM
    • 442 Posts
    • 191 Thanks
    Energize
    Yes, they can use it against you. If they have reasonable grounds to think that you are working a second job that could be a disciplinary issue and could certainly be an issue for you if you were to look for a promotion etc, if the impression they have of you is that you are not fully committed or if they feel that you don't fit the ethos of their business.

    The sensible thing to do would be to either amend what you have on linked in, to make it clearer that you are a private investor in property, or to remove it altogether.

    I would also suggest that you explain to your employer why you added the information and let them know that you are willing to remove or change the information so it is less confusing.

    From their perspective, they have a legitimate concern that you may have a second job, which may be in breach of your terms of employment and which (if you work full time) would raise legitimate concerns about whether you are doing a side job on the clock.

    They may also have concerns that it could give their customers or clients the wrong impression if they check your listing.

    Linked in is primarily marketed and perceived as a professional network rather than a social one - I'm sceptical as to how useful it would be to you in any event of you are not working in that sector, but if you feel that social media would be helpful then I'd suggest that you look accounts which are wholly separate from your job or professional role, - look at twitter, forums or sites dedicated to investors /. property investment etc.

    Also, consider what, if any, benefits you have had from having the information on our profile? What, specifically, were you hoping to get from it? I can see that networking is important if you *are* working and looking for clients, but much less so if you are simply interested in investing privately.
    Originally posted by TBagpuss
    Working a second job is not normally something an employer can take action against, individuals are free to engage in business with multiple employers if they wish, unless there is a direct conflict of interest it's really not an employers business what the employee gets up to out of work.
    • stator
    • By stator 7th Mar 18, 8:59 PM
    • 6,220 Posts
    • 4,105 Thanks
    stator
    When you get the chance, just make it clear you were looking for people to invest with. Investing in something isn't a job. It's not as if you said you were looking to become a property developer. Don't feel the need to over explain yourself, or tell them everything about this course you were on, or what you wanted to do in the future. Don't give them anything they could hold against you.
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • Fused
    • By Fused 7th Mar 18, 9:06 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Fused
    Thank you stator.

    This is exactly what I thought, property investing is not an additional job, I was embarking on the course in order to study for the future, when I am in a better financial position to buy a property.

    I'm sure there are many people who have purchased an additional property in order to invest for the future whilst still being employed.
    • steampowered
    • By steampowered 7th Mar 18, 11:39 PM
    • 2,487 Posts
    • 2,407 Thanks
    steampowered
    Your explanation sounds perfectly reasonable. There isn't anything wrong with using linkedin to network for investment purposes.

    Is the employer really going to sack anyone who has a buy-to-let property, or anyone who has a pension? Those are all investments!

    It sounds like your employer has had a bit of a common sense failure. It would be beyond stupid for an employer to sack you because you were interested in investing in property.
    • Bigmoney2
    • By Bigmoney2 8th Mar 18, 2:04 PM
    • 623 Posts
    • 453 Thanks
    Bigmoney2
    Working a second job is not normally something an employer can take action against, individuals are free to engage in business with multiple employers if they wish, unless there is a direct conflict of interest it's really not an employers business what the employee gets up to out of work.
    Originally posted by Energize
    My previous employer had a policy of no second jobs without their express written permission.
    • stator
    • By stator 8th Mar 18, 4:45 PM
    • 6,220 Posts
    • 4,105 Thanks
    stator
    My previous employer had a policy of no second jobs without their express written permission.
    Originally posted by Bigmoney2
    Just because they have a policy doesn't mean it's enforceable under law.
    They would have to provide a valid business reason for this policy, if it ever got to court.
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • anamenottaken
    • By anamenottaken 8th Mar 18, 7:03 PM
    • 4,144 Posts
    • 3,631 Thanks
    anamenottaken
    Working a second job is not normally something an employer can take action against, individuals are free to engage in business with multiple employers if they wish, unless there is a direct conflict of interest it's really not an employers business what the employee gets up to out of work.
    Originally posted by Energize
    But the employer in this case thinks there is another employer, that is not "out of work", it is work but with a different employer. They do need to know because, if their employee has not signed a 48-our opt out, the employer needs to know they are not working in excess of the 48-hour average.
    • anamenottaken
    • By anamenottaken 8th Mar 18, 7:06 PM
    • 4,144 Posts
    • 3,631 Thanks
    anamenottaken
    I have explained why the information was there and since removed it. It had been there for nearly 2 years and had forgotten about it.
    The status said 'looking to network with likeminded property investors having completed my Progressive training' I wish I hadn't put it on there now, I didn't realise it would cause such confusion
    Originally posted by Fused
    Sounds like Progressive wants people to mention them, to provide advertising for their training.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 8th Mar 18, 7:27 PM
    • 6,487 Posts
    • 8,413 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    Working a second job is not normally something an employer can take action against, individuals are free to engage in business with multiple employers if they wish, unless there is a direct conflict of interest it's really not an employers business what the employee gets up to out of work.
    Originally posted by Energize
    It's quite common to have exclusions in the contract. And while you are right that having a second job in your own time would normally be your own business, if the employer had reason to think that an employee was working at a second job during their working hours, that would be disciplinary issue.

    OP, I suspect that the reference to training would be the issue. If you had simply said something like 'interested in property investment and looking to net work with other investors' it might have been less of an issue.
    • lisyloo
    • By lisyloo 8th Mar 18, 7:28 PM
    • 21,832 Posts
    • 10,546 Thanks
    lisyloo
    Working a second job is not normally something an employer can take action against, individuals are free to engage in business with multiple employers if they wish, unless there is a direct conflict of interest it's really not an employers business what the employee gets up to out of work.
    Originally posted by Energize
    My contract that I signed states I cannot have another business interest without their consent.
    Is this enforceable?

    Btw something also those lines has been in most employment contracts I!!!8217;ve had although the exact wording has varied - business interest, being an employee, to working.
    I work in IT
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