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  • FIRST POST
    • MrsGizzard
    • By MrsGizzard 7th Mar 18, 4:07 PM
    • 8Posts
    • 2Thanks
    MrsGizzard
    Something fishy
    • #1
    • 7th Mar 18, 4:07 PM
    Something fishy 7th Mar 18 at 4:07 PM
    Just decided to get a full buildings survey on my own home. The first local surveyor I called was the company who (unbeknownst to me) did our buyer’s valuation survey, only they sent someone from Rutland (about an hour away), even though their local office is in town. (And the Beast from the East was choking the A1).

    They share offices and services with an estate agent who happens to be representing the people opposite, who can’t shift their house. Ours was marketed at £305K (although EA recommended £315K) and got full price at £305K after one viewing. Theirs is on at £325K. Anyway, the valuation came in at £295K.

    They’re RICS, so independent. But I think it’s all a bit fishy. But can’t think what the point of suppressing our property price would be. But when discussing it with them, (until they realised it was them who’d done the survey), they were bemused because there’s some kind of 8% tolerance, which seemed not to have been applied.

    Any thoughts?
Page 3
    • Gwendo40
    • By Gwendo40 12th Mar 18, 4:35 PM
    • 101 Posts
    • 95 Thanks
    Gwendo40
    I am usually a 'live and let live', everyone is entitled to their opinion kind of person, but Crashy you seem to delight in the thought of there being a housing market crash and people not being able to afford their homes.

    What sort of person to you have to be to wish that amount of misery and stress on millions of homeowners purely so that you can say 'I told you so'?
    Originally posted by kates08
    Not much difference with those who delight in rampant, policy driven, house price inflation despite it bringing misery and stress to millions of non-homeowners.
    • kates08
    • By kates08 12th Mar 18, 6:47 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 92 Thanks
    kates08
    "Only three kinds of people want housing to be priced at decades worth of debt for the average person, bankers (based on greed), those who bought a long time ago (greed and fear of "loss") and people who can`t think very deeply (just not very bright)"

    And the people who have moved/bought recently and will be in negative equity if there is a crash. Perhaps you're classing them as the "not very bright", but i'd rather live my life the way I want than sit around waiting for 20 years to see if there is a crash. A house isn't just an investment to everyone you know, it's a home too. What I'm objecting to is the comments you make that seem to be delighting in the thought of homeowners not being able to pay their mortgage and losing their homes. I'm not sitting here gleeful at the thought of all the people who can't get on the housing ladder at the moment, I'm not that cruel.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 12th Mar 18, 6:51 PM
    • 9,364 Posts
    • 10,318 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    Not much difference with those who delight in rampant, policy driven, house price inflation despite it bringing misery and stress to millions of non-homeowners.
    Originally posted by Gwendo40
    You have confused people stating what the situation is with them wanting a situation to be like that.
    Last edited by AnotherJoe; 12-03-2018 at 10:48 PM.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 12th Mar 18, 6:53 PM
    • 17,356 Posts
    • 15,700 Thanks
    AdrianC
    ...but i'd rather live my life the way I want than sit around waiting for 20 years to see if there is a crash.
    Originally posted by kates08
    And that, of course, is Crashy's issue. AIUI, he sold his house in the expectation of an imminent crash.

    Decades ago.

    He's still waiting.
    • kates08
    • By kates08 12th Mar 18, 7:35 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 92 Thanks
    kates08
    You have confused people stating what the situation is with them wanting a situation to be like that.
    Not the first time you've been confused.
    Thanks for that AnotherJoe, You have confused me talking about specific posts from Crashy where he has indeed stated that is what he wants with me talking about the general conversation. Not the first time you've been confused.
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 12th Mar 18, 7:52 PM
    • 6,058 Posts
    • 2,345 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    "Only three kinds of people want housing to be priced at decades worth of debt for the average person, bankers (based on greed), those who bought a long time ago (greed and fear of "loss") and people who can`t think very deeply (just not very bright)"

    And the people who have moved/bought recently and will be in negative equity if there is a crash. Perhaps you're classing them as the "not very bright", but i'd rather live my life the way I want than sit around waiting for 20 years to see if there is a crash. A house isn't just an investment to everyone you know, it's a home too. What I'm objecting to is the comments you make that seem to be delighting in the thought of homeowners not being able to pay their mortgage and losing their homes. I'm not sitting here gleeful at the thought of all the people who can't get on the housing ladder at the moment, I'm not that cruel.
    Originally posted by kates08

    Two points; 1) It isn`t a housing "Ladder" any more, it is a bubble waiting to pop, only still here because of MASSIVE central bank intervention - Rate cuts, QE, HTB etc. 2) If you believe that I have been waiting 20 years for a crash you are very misguided, and reading too much nonsense from the posters who will just say anything to avoid facing up to the fact that their asset is going to lose a lot of value.
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 12th Mar 18, 7:54 PM
    • 6,058 Posts
    • 2,345 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    And that, of course, is Crashy's issue. AIUI, he sold his house in the expectation of an imminent crash.

    Decades ago.

    He's still waiting.
    Originally posted by AdrianC

    You realise that most people reading know that you don`t know this and are just making it up....don`t you?
    • kates08
    • By kates08 12th Mar 18, 8:34 PM
    • 76 Posts
    • 92 Thanks
    kates08
    Crashy, whatever your life plan is I hope it works out for you, I wish you the best. I'm only asking that you remember that there are real people in real homes (not assets, homes) whose lives will be ruined if what you're gleefully predicting ever happens. You can put your argument across and while being sensitive to that at the same time.
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 12th Mar 18, 9:08 PM
    • 6,058 Posts
    • 2,345 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    Crashy, whatever your life plan is I hope it works out for you, I wish you the best. I'm only asking that you remember that there are real people in real homes (not assets, homes) whose lives will be ruined if what you're gleefully predicting ever happens. You can put your argument across and while being sensitive to that at the same time.
    Originally posted by kates08

    I doubt that their lives will be actually "ruined", depends on their belief system of course, but in the UK, even with the economic mess that we are in, they won`t go hungry or without shelter, or without a big telly to sit in front of, they will just be even deeper in debt and worth less than they hoped. I have long said that anyone not taking advantage of super low rates to pay down any debt that they have is asking for trouble, and that is about as sensitive as I can get on this topic I`m afraid
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 12th Mar 18, 10:46 PM
    • 9,364 Posts
    • 10,318 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    Thanks for that AnotherJoe, You have confused me talking about specific posts from Crashy where he has indeed stated that is what he wants with me talking about the general conversation. Not the first time you've been confused.
    Originally posted by kates08
    Sorry kate i shoudl have quoted the previous poster i was replying to i think you posted in between. I'll edit it.
    • Gwendo40
    • By Gwendo40 13th Mar 18, 10:36 AM
    • 101 Posts
    • 95 Thanks
    Gwendo40
    Thanks for that AnotherJoe, You have confused me talking about specific posts from Crashy where he has indeed stated that is what he wants with me talking about the general conversation. Not the first time you've been confused.
    Originally posted by kates08
    No confusion at all here from me with regards to the point that I was making, it's quite simple if you take the emotion out of it.

    There is no difference between those wanting a fall in house prices despite the misery it may cause some home owners... and those wanting house prices to remain propped up at artificially high levels despite the misery it may cause some none home owners.
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 13th Mar 18, 9:42 PM
    • 6,058 Posts
    • 2,345 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    No confusion at all here from me with regards to the point that I was making, it's quite simple if you take the emotion out of it.

    There is no difference between those wanting a fall in house prices despite the misery it may cause some home owners... and those wanting house prices to remain propped up at artificially high levels despite the misery it may cause some none home owners.
    Originally posted by Gwendo40

    As long as top bankers don`t feel any misery the job`s a good `un
    A good crash might wake some of the population up to the evils of our debt based monetary system though
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 14th Mar 18, 3:13 PM
    • 6,058 Posts
    • 2,345 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    You have confused people stating what the situation is with them wanting a situation to be like that.
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe

    Pretending (to yourself, or others on the internet, or actually believing) that house prices are where they are due to actual Supply and Demand is still pretty silly though?
    • buggy_boy
    • By buggy_boy 14th Mar 18, 5:55 PM
    • 402 Posts
    • 263 Thanks
    buggy_boy
    Pretending (to yourself, or others on the internet, or actually believing) that house prices are where they are due to actual Supply and Demand is still pretty silly though?
    Originally posted by Crashy Time
    I dont think many people would disagree that house prices have been effected by credit, you will argue about low interest rates (Which is not wrong) but then you will forget the lending has got a lot more stringent so less people can get the amount of mortgage needed, that should have reduced prices but you ignore this...

    If you think we have built enough houses over the last 20 years then that is pretty silly... The housing market is complex and is effected by so much, for a long time BTL investors were blamed for high house prices, yet since the tax changes they have mostly disappeared, yet prices have not crashed...

    Out of interest Crashy when do you think this crash will happen as looking at your posts for the last 4 years its always happening now... Do you think we are in a crash, we had a crash 4 years ago or will have a crash next week?
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 14th Mar 18, 6:04 PM
    • 1,874 Posts
    • 2,727 Thanks
    shortcrust
    Did anyone else expect this thread to be about prawns hidden under the floor boards?
    • Mickygg
    • By Mickygg 14th Mar 18, 8:51 PM
    • 1,419 Posts
    • 1,165 Thanks
    Mickygg
    Did anyone else expect this thread to be about prawns hidden under the floor boards?
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    No but I expected fool crashy to hijack it and spout utter rubbish.
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 14th Mar 18, 10:13 PM
    • 6,058 Posts
    • 2,345 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    No but I expected fool crashy to hijack it and spout utter rubbish.
    Originally posted by Mickygg

    Ignore function broken down again has it?
    • Crashy Time
    • By Crashy Time 15th Mar 18, 11:35 PM
    • 6,058 Posts
    • 2,345 Thanks
    Crashy Time
    I dont think many people would disagree that house prices have been effected by credit, you will argue about low interest rates (Which is not wrong) but then you will forget the lending has got a lot more stringent so less people can get the amount of mortgage needed, that should have reduced prices but you ignore this...

    If you think we have built enough houses over the last 20 years then that is pretty silly... The housing market is complex and is effected by so much, for a long time BTL investors were blamed for high house prices, yet since the tax changes they have mostly disappeared, yet prices have not crashed...

    Out of interest Crashy when do you think this crash will happen as looking at your posts for the last 4 years its always happening now... Do you think we are in a crash, we had a crash 4 years ago or will have a crash next week?
    Originally posted by buggy_boy

    No, with record low interest rates all this does is reduce sales, people will cling to their price delusions until rising interest rates indicate to them clearly that the boat has sailed.
    • buggy_boy
    • By buggy_boy 16th Mar 18, 9:21 AM
    • 402 Posts
    • 263 Thanks
    buggy_boy
    No, with record low interest rates all this does is reduce sales, people will cling to their price delusions until rising interest rates indicate to them clearly that the boat has sailed.
    Originally posted by Crashy Time
    Your logic makes no sense. Record low interest rates you would think would do the opposite, people could borrow more so would sell to move up unless they were worried about their jobs (Im not sure what the current sentiment is regarding job security). The only way rising interest rates will change peoples minds is if they are forced to sell, but that is a way off (And likely need to include job losses)..

    Don't forget we have Brexit coming up, given the banks propensity to lower interest rates when the economic outlook is low, IMO I think rates will rise a percentage point or two, but then be dropped at the the various stages of Brexit (aka 2019 when we go into transition and then 2021 when we actually leave). Just look at what happened when we voted to exit, the bank reduced rates in a knee jerk reaction, the only rise we have had is to correct that reduction. What makes you believe rates are going to rise so fast? Carney and media have been reporting imminent rate rises for years now, they are like the boy who cried wolf. (Although you should not think rates will not rise as that is dangerous).
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 16th Mar 18, 9:53 AM
    • 9,364 Posts
    • 10,318 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    No, with record low interest rates all this does is reduce sales, people will cling to their price delusions until rising interest rates indicate to them clearly that the boat has sailed.
    Originally posted by Crashy Time
    LOL.
    Previously you've stated that record low interest rates are propping up house prices and create a bubble.
    Now you say record low interest rates reduce sales !
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