Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • charb56
    • By charb56 7th Mar 18, 10:30 AM
    • 28Posts
    • 2Thanks
    charb56
    neighbours light fitting fallen-blaming son
    • #1
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:30 AM
    neighbours light fitting fallen-blaming son 7th Mar 18 at 10:30 AM
    hope this is the right forum-my son owns a first floor flat on his own for 6 years and lives very quietly with the required carpeting on the floors
    he has been emailed by the owner downstairs who lives abroad and rents his flat out, that the chandelier-type light fitting has fallen down and that my son must have caused it. he hasn't changed his lifestyle at all and is very upset. the owner downstairs is very intimidating. the light fixture has been up for years.the block is also on a main road with a lot of vibration.
    my son emiled back copying in the managing agent saying his lifestyle and his flat haven't changed and its nothing to do with him, hes waiting to see if there's a reply but is very scared by him-any advice much appreciated thanks
Page 1
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 7th Mar 18, 10:36 AM
    • 15,607 Posts
    • 43,334 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:36 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:36 AM
    I would have thought most likely explanation is something to do with the flat-owner themselves - and not your son.

    My assumption would be that some screws or something fitting this ceiling had worked loose over the years - on a "fair wear and tear" basis.

    I'd be willing to bet this guy hasn't even shown your son the light fitting concerned and given him the chance for a good look at the ceiling.

    If I were neighbour concerned - and it genuinely was down to "upstairs" (which I doubt) I'd be showing "upstairs" neighbour the light fitting and ceiling to prove it.

    EDIT; just realised you said this flat is rented out. Put like that - it's just the sort of thing a careless tenant would do to decide to attach something-or-other decorative to a chandelier type light fitting in order to look a bit different/more modern. If so - the weight of the "extra something" might have been "last straw" weight-wise on a chandelier that was coping perfectly well before they did that.

    Other thought is that tenant might have been changing a bulb in the light fitting or painting the ceiling and accidentally caught hold of the light fitting - and it wasnt strong enough to bear their weight (ie as well as its own weight).
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 07-03-2018 at 10:39 AM.
    Like Frankie said - I did it my way.
    It's MY life......
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 7th Mar 18, 10:45 AM
    • 2,534 Posts
    • 4,042 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:45 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:45 AM
    Legally of course it is simple - he needs to prove it was something to do with your son. If he can't prove it, he has no leg to stand on.

    If your son is scared, why is he scared? What does he think this guy might do?
    • theartfullodger
    • By theartfullodger 7th Mar 18, 10:53 AM
    • 9,532 Posts
    • 12,787 Thanks
    theartfullodger
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:53 AM
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:53 AM
    But son should do all he can to avoid having to declare a dispute with neighbour when eventually he sells...
    • charb56
    • By charb56 7th Mar 18, 10:54 AM
    • 28 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    charb56
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:54 AM
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:54 AM
    my son lives alone, the relatives of the person living below have been very aggressive and intimidating in the past both to him and other residents, also the owner downstairs is in a long running legal dispute with the management agency for non payment of service charge so he has form for troublemaking
    • charb56
    • By charb56 7th Mar 18, 10:57 AM
    • 28 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    charb56
    • #6
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:57 AM
    • #6
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:57 AM
    he is worried he will have to get a lawyer in and just feels completely out of his depth on this when he has done nothing wrong
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 7th Mar 18, 11:28 AM
    • 1,897 Posts
    • 2,764 Thanks
    shortcrust
    • #7
    • 7th Mar 18, 11:28 AM
    • #7
    • 7th Mar 18, 11:28 AM
    Ooo I'm furious on your son's behalf. What would you have to be doing to make a properly secured chandelier fall off?! If it were me I think I'd lose my rag. I'd start by telling him where to stick his chandelier.

    The only response that's needed to the chandelier lunacy is to simply state that it's an absurd allegation and he won't dignify it with a response. That's it.

    The harassment and intimidation is a different matter. I don't know enough about the circumstances to offer advice but hope someone else can. I will say though that I've had a couple of occasions where I've had very heated confrontations with aggressive neighbours. One ended with me calling the police as a strapping young chap pounded on my door, and each left me shaking like a leaf. But they left me feeling empowered and they sorted out the anti-social behaviour. You've got to guard your castle.

    Edit to add: Reading this back it does make me sound quite cross and combative! I should add that reason I'd be livid is that this seems like an act of bullying to me, not a normal neighbour dispute.
    Last edited by shortcrust; 07-03-2018 at 6:07 PM.
    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 7th Mar 18, 11:28 AM
    • 6,323 Posts
    • 6,180 Thanks
    eddddy
    • #8
    • 7th Mar 18, 11:28 AM
    • #8
    • 7th Mar 18, 11:28 AM
    In legal terms, your son doesn't have to do anything unless/until the neighbour decides to make a claim through the small claims court.

    (If that really did happen, your son would just have to prepare a statement confirming that he didn't do anything negligent that caused damage to the chandelier.)

    Alternatively, the lease might allow the neighbour to ask the freeholder to appoint a professional building surveyor to investigate. But I'm pretty sure that the surveyor would say your son is not to blame. (And the neighbour would be left to cover the cost of a surveyor's bill, for much more than the cost of the chandelier.)


    From a practical perspective, it probably makes sense for your son to politely explain that he hasn't done anything wrong (as he did in his email), in the hope that this defuses the situation. But he doesn't have to say anything, if he doesn't want to.
    • theartfullodger
    • By theartfullodger 7th Mar 18, 11:38 AM
    • 9,532 Posts
    • 12,787 Thanks
    theartfullodger
    • #9
    • 7th Mar 18, 11:38 AM
    • #9
    • 7th Mar 18, 11:38 AM
    Rodney & the chandelier...
    • davidmcn
    • By davidmcn 7th Mar 18, 11:44 AM
    • 7,652 Posts
    • 7,791 Thanks
    davidmcn
    Rodney & the chandelier...
    Originally posted by theartfullodger
    Ha! Yes, that's the only sort of activity which might make the upstairs neighbour liable.
    • charb56
    • By charb56 7th Mar 18, 11:45 AM
    • 28 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    charb56
    thanks needed a laugh!!
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 7th Mar 18, 11:52 AM
    • 1,897 Posts
    • 2,764 Thanks
    shortcrust
    If your son wants to crowdfund a laminate floor and big pair of boots I'll definitely chip in.
    • charb56
    • By charb56 7th Mar 18, 11:54 AM
    • 28 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    charb56
    the other issue is that they put wood floors in without permission.....
    • zagubov
    • By zagubov 7th Mar 18, 2:50 PM
    • 15,274 Posts
    • 130,704 Thanks
    zagubov
    If your son wants to crowdfund a laminate floor and big pair of boots I'll definitely chip in.
    Originally posted by shortcrust
    I'd contribute towards clogs, tap-dancing lessons and a tuba.
    There is no honour to be had in not knowing a thing that can be known - Danny Baker
    • MEM62
    • By MEM62 7th Mar 18, 3:33 PM
    • 1,572 Posts
    • 1,193 Thanks
    MEM62
    he is worried he will have to get a lawyer in and just feels completely out of his depth on this when he has done nothing wrong
    Originally posted by charb56
    Lawyer? Why?

    He is being far too easily intimidated by the owner of the downstairs property. The suggestion that fixtures and fittings of this nature can be disturbed by you son going about his daily life is farcical. He should write a very short letter refuting the claim and stating he will not respond to any further correspondence on the matter unless the claim can be backed up with some evidence.
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 7th Mar 18, 4:53 PM
    • 6,955 Posts
    • 5,720 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    he is worried he will have to get a lawyer in and just feels completely out of his depth on this when he has done nothing wrong
    Originally posted by charb56
    If he has done nothing wrong he has got nothing to worry about. If the chandelier was fitted securely it wouldn't have come away from the ceiling. The owner needs to complain to whoever fitted it or the current tenants who are far more likely to have dislodged it.

    Advise your son to deny causing damage and avoid any dispute about it as it is literally nothing to do with him.
    Last edited by Norman Castle; 07-03-2018 at 4:56 PM.
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 7th Mar 18, 4:56 PM
    • 16,373 Posts
    • 41,388 Thanks
    elsien
    If they're intimidating him, next time they come round and are out of order tell him to call the police if he is feeling threatened. Otherwise as he's already responded I'd just ignore anything else that they send, short of a small claims court. But I really can't see it getting that far.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 7th Mar 18, 5:32 PM
    • 10,518 Posts
    • 13,684 Thanks
    hazyjo
    Anyone else visualising Delboy, Rodney and Grandad?


    I'm going straight to hell... sorry!
    2018 wins: Single Malt Whisky; theatre tickets; festival tickets; year of gin(!); shoes
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 7th Mar 18, 6:37 PM
    • 3,011 Posts
    • 6,048 Thanks
    Smodlet
    Anyone else visualising Delboy, Rodney and Grandad?


    I'm going straight to hell... sorry!
    Originally posted by hazyjo

    Yes... Since artful mentioned it in #9. "Brace yourself, Rodney".

    Charb56, I agree this moron downstairs sounds like a bully. He almost certainly knows your son is easily intimidated. The only way to deal with bullies is to stand up to them.

    I suggest he contacts the local council's Anti-Social Behaviour team and asks their advice though he will need proof of his own; a log of incidents, better yet, recordings of them. If he has none, could he record the next time the thug approaches him in anything other than a polite and respectful manner? This can then be used as evidence for the police in the first instance and by the ASB team going forward.

    HTH.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • ACG
    • By ACG 7th Mar 18, 6:47 PM
    • 16,832 Posts
    • 8,784 Thanks
    ACG
    No need to go a solicitor involved, just deny any knowledge and refuse to do anything. If your son receives legal documents from court then it might be time to change that stance but until then I would just ignore it.

    To be fair, even if it went to court they still have to prove your son is the guilty party over the tenants or wear and tear.
    I am a Mortgage Adviser
    You should note that this site doesn't check my status as a mortgage adviser, so you need to take my word for it. This signature is here as I follow MSE's Mortgage Adviser Code of Conduct. Any posts on here are for information and discussion purposes only and shouldn't be seen as financial advice.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,700Posts Today

7,662Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • It's the start of mini MSE's half term. In order to be the best daddy possible, Im stopping work and going off line? https://t.co/kwjvtd75YU

  • RT @shellsince1982: @MartinSLewis thanx to your email I have just saved myself £222 by taking a SIM only deal for £7.50 a month and keeping?

  • Today's Friday twitter poll: An important question, building on yesterday's important discussions: Which is the best bit of the pizza...

  • Follow Martin