Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • IAN1978
    • By IAN1978 7th Mar 18, 4:21 AM
    • 4Posts
    • 0Thanks
    IAN1978
    Cold bedroom in new build house
    • #1
    • 7th Mar 18, 4:21 AM
    Cold bedroom in new build house 7th Mar 18 at 4:21 AM
    I've moved in to a new build home in the last 6 months, and we've noticed that the house takes a long time to heat up and, in the case of my daughter's bedroom, never gets up to the desired temperature.
    The house is 3 storey with 2 thermostats, one of the ground floor controlling just that level, and one in the main bedroom on the 3rd floor controlling the 2nd and 3rd floors.
    The landing just outside my daughter's bedroom gets up to temperature (usually about 21oC) within an hour, but her room is always 2-4oC colder, and can sometimes take several hours to get anywhere near the desired temperature. This we believe is because the thermostat that controls her floor is on the top floor, i.e the warmest room in the house. Why the housing developers put the thermostat there we don't know.
    I have measured the radiator in her room and done the relevant calculations to see if it is adequate, and it is woefully under par. I have spoken to the developers and they say that they provide enough heating output to heat the house as a whole, not on a room by room basis. I have explained to them about the radiator and the fact that my daughter goes to bed looking like the Michelin man to keep warm at night, but they just keep repeating the same thing.
    Not sure where to turn to next. Should we go to the NHBC to see if they can help?
    Any advice would be appreciated.
Page 1
    • Typhoon2000
    • By Typhoon2000 7th Mar 18, 5:55 AM
    • 859 Posts
    • 420 Thanks
    Typhoon2000
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 5:55 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Mar 18, 5:55 AM
    Assuming the radiator does not need bleeding or balancing, you could turn the TRV in the the bedroom up to maximum and turn down the one near the thermostat.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 7th Mar 18, 7:41 AM
    • 4,225 Posts
    • 2,738 Thanks
    Furts
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 7:41 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Mar 18, 7:41 AM
    Speaking with the developers is the wrong way forward. Matters have to be in writing. Tthis writing can include the history to date. Heating is all a grey area, but the bedroom is required to reach 18C so your expectations are too high. However if it takes hours to reach this temperature you could argue matters are unsatisfactory. This is all related to a low outside temperature.

    If you get nowhere with the official, written, audit trail, then NHBC is the next option.

    Be aware there could be a multitude of issues from inadequate insulation, to draughts, to damaged pipework, to local exposure levels. All round do not expect matters to be straight forward. No developer wants to start dismantling a new home- it costs money!
    • IAN1978
    • By IAN1978 7th Mar 18, 10:10 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    IAN1978
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:10 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:10 PM
    Hi, thanks for the responses. The radiator are working fine. They're getting hot and the trv is on max. It just doesnt heat the room up adequately.
    We've been monitoring the temps inside and outside the bedroom and taking photos as evidence.
    The radiator in the main bedroom with the thermostat in doesn't have a trv. Maybe fitting one would be a simple solution.
    Have got a plumber round to have a look and they'll report back to the developer. See what they say, but I won't hold my breath
    • jaybeetoo
    • By jaybeetoo 7th Mar 18, 10:45 PM
    • 586 Posts
    • 278 Thanks
    jaybeetoo
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:45 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:45 PM
    I assume you have checked the insulation in the roof above the bedroom? When I moved into my new house (many years ago), I went into the loft and found the builder hadn't installed any insulation!
    • Furts
    • By Furts 8th Mar 18, 8:07 AM
    • 4,225 Posts
    • 2,738 Thanks
    Furts
    • #6
    • 8th Mar 18, 8:07 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Mar 18, 8:07 AM
    Hi, thanks for the responses. The radiator are working fine. They're getting hot and the trv is on max. It just doesnt heat the room up adequately.
    We've been monitoring the temps inside and outside the bedroom and taking photos as evidence.
    The radiator in the main bedroom with the thermostat in doesn't have a trv. Maybe fitting one would be a simple solution.
    Have got a plumber round to have a look and they'll report back to the developer. See what they say, but I won't hold my breath
    Originally posted by IAN1978
    Would you have a trv in the same room as a thermostat? Seems illogical - if the trv is closed down yet the thermostat is calling for heat what happens then?

    Why is the thermostat in the main bedroom and not suitably located on the landing area? Here it would be trying to give you a temperature control related to the whole floor level.

    You have not answered my observation on expectations - why do you believe you should be achieving 21C in the "problem" bedroom?
    • Typhoon2000
    • By Typhoon2000 8th Mar 18, 8:33 AM
    • 859 Posts
    • 420 Thanks
    Typhoon2000
    • #7
    • 8th Mar 18, 8:33 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Mar 18, 8:33 AM
    Would you have a trv in the same room as a thermostat? Seems illogical - if the trv is closed down yet the thermostat is calling for heat what happens then?
    Originally posted by Furts
    The room with the Termostat stays at a comfortable temperature whilst the cold room is the one that warms up.

    I suspect the child is is one of the smaller rooms so even a small radiator should be suffienct as long the boiler is on long enough. But with the thermostat in a warmer room or maybe poorly positioned near a radiator, the boiler is switching off before the child rooms heats up.


    The op could also fit a wireless thermostat fairly cheaply and move it to the colder room as needed. Easy enough to fit a TRV to the radiator in the main bedroom.
    • IAN1978
    • By IAN1978 8th Mar 18, 10:02 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    IAN1978
    • #8
    • 8th Mar 18, 10:02 AM
    • #8
    • 8th Mar 18, 10:02 AM
    Would you have a trv in the same room as a thermostat? Seems illogical - if the trv is closed down yet the thermostat is calling for heat what happens then?

    Why is the thermostat in the main bedroom and not suitably located on the landing area? Here it would be trying to give you a temperature control related to the whole floor level.

    You have not answered my observation on expectations - why do you believe you should be achieving 21C in the "problem" bedroom?
    Originally posted by Furts
    My other half and daughter feel the cold a lot more than I do, so they're happier with a higher room temp. Also, by putting the higher temp in the thermostat, it should in theory make my daughter's room a bit warmer.
    Unfortunately, we didn't have say in where the thermostat was located. I completely agree with you that it should be on the first floor, and we can't understand the builder's logic with where they situated it.
    • IAN1978
    • By IAN1978 8th Mar 18, 10:04 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    IAN1978
    • #9
    • 8th Mar 18, 10:04 AM
    • #9
    • 8th Mar 18, 10:04 AM
    I assume you have checked the insulation in the roof above the bedroom? When I moved into my new house (many years ago), I went into the loft and found the builder hadn't installed any insulation!
    Originally posted by jaybeetoo
    We did think this, but when mentioned to the developer they said that the NHBC would not have passed the house if that was the case. We would like to check this out but have been told that if we drill any holes to check it out our warranty would be invalidated.
    • Trapdoor
    • By Trapdoor 8th Mar 18, 11:35 AM
    • 51 Posts
    • 18 Thanks
    Trapdoor
    Easiest solution would be to replace the stat upstairs with a Wireless type, such as a Drayton Digistat RF ... the receiver goes where the old wired wall mounted stat goes and the bit you set the temperature on goes wherever in the house you want to control the temperature.

    Then, you would look at stopping down the TRVs or lockshields on the upstairs rads to stop them getting too hot and to stop you wasting heat from the boiler. Stick the wireless stat in the cold room and set to the temperature required. Let the room come up to temp and go see which other rads may need closing down (or opening up) a bit.

    If you don’t feel comfortable about changing the stat out, get a heating engineer in, but it shouldn’t cost much (the stats are about £80) plus an hour labour.

    With some of the other radiators closed down, more of the heat should be getting to the colder radiator, but bear in mind that you’ll never get more heat out of it than it’s rated Output.
    Last edited by Trapdoor; 08-03-2018 at 11:39 AM.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 8th Mar 18, 11:35 AM
    • 24,261 Posts
    • 51,244 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    We did think this, but when mentioned to the developer they said that the NHBC would not have passed the house if that was the case. We would like to check this out but have been told that if we drill any holes to check it out our warranty would be invalidated.
    Originally posted by IAN1978

    I don't doubt you for a moment but I'm genuinely astonished that a property would be built with a loft space to which there was no access.
    • vacheron
    • By vacheron 8th Mar 18, 11:47 AM
    • 824 Posts
    • 760 Thanks
    vacheron
    If the builder will not budge, Things i would consider (in this order) would be:
    1. Check the room for draughts, cold spots, or any damp areas, especailly around the windows.

    2. Turn down the manual (non-TRV valve) in the 3rd floor bedroom. This should heat the room with the thermostat slower and allow more time for your daughters room to get warm.

    3. As the house is a new build the radiators may not have not been correctly balanced (this takes time to do properly). The radiator in your daughters room may be hot to touch at the top, but if the lockshield valve has been closed too much during the initial balancing the return temperatures from her radiator may be too low so the radiator will not be operating at its full efficiency. Conversely the one in the bedroom wit the thermostat may be too far open.

    4. Consider a wireless thermostat which will allow you to move the temperature sensor to any room in the house to obtain a better balance. Easy to fit / remove and no house wiring disturbance necessary.

    5. If your daughters radiator is a single, replace it with a single with fins, if it is a single with fins, swap it for a double. Easy job for any plumber or competent DIY'er. and will significantly increase the heat released into that room.

    *edit: Just noticed Trapdoor hit on a lot of these while I was typing!
    Last edited by vacheron; 08-03-2018 at 11:51 AM.
    • The rich buy assets.
    • The poor only have expenses.
    • The middle class buy liabilities they think are assets.
    Robert T. Kiyosaki
    • Furts
    • By Furts 8th Mar 18, 12:09 PM
    • 4,225 Posts
    • 2,738 Thanks
    Furts
    We did think this, but when mentioned to the developer they said that the NHBC would not have passed the house if that was the case. We would like to check this out but have been told that if we drill any holes to check it out our warranty would be invalidated.
    Originally posted by IAN1978




    Both wrong and unfortunately what developers say, but are less willing to put in writing. Which is why your concerns have to be in writing. Back to my earlier post and I re-iterate that the developer is going to fob you off - they will have little interest in you because the profits are declared and now somebody ( probably them) has to pay for what is happening.


    Bear in mind it is your home so you are at liberty to do as you. A warranty is not going to stop you methodically checking a loft space above your daughters bedroom. A careful pilot drilling and hole cutter could also look at the walls - your choice here.


    But ponder laterally. New homes are exceptionally well insulated and draft proofed - if built properly. They require minimal heating. Nobody has seen your degree of exposure, but as a general rule, your cold house suggests something is wrong somewhere. Insulation and drafts has to be part of your search
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

421Posts Today

5,815Users online

Martin's Twitter
  • It's the start of mini MSE's half term. In order to be the best daddy possible, Im stopping work and going off line? https://t.co/kwjvtd75YU

  • RT @shellsince1982: @MartinSLewis thanx to your email I have just saved myself £222 by taking a SIM only deal for £7.50 a month and keeping?

  • Today's Friday twitter poll: An important question, building on yesterday's important discussions: Which is the best bit of the pizza...

  • Follow Martin