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  • FIRST POST
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 6th Mar 18, 7:12 PM
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    dekaspace
    Am I asking too much of my GP?
    • #1
    • 6th Mar 18, 7:12 PM
    Am I asking too much of my GP? 6th Mar 18 at 7:12 PM
    Not asking for health advice more advice on GPs actions.

    Lived in area 4 years, before that had a excellent GP who gave me regular bloodtests that diagnosed hormonal problems especially in winter months (when I feel weak), referred me for hospital tests and I was put on medication, was on it for a few months but cut down as the medication worked too well then moved to current area and GP made me go cold turkey along with the anti depressants I was taking.

    Had 1 blood test in 4 years, the first winter I was there that diagnosed vitamin issue (and likely linked to something else) now every time I go in everything gets passed off with "its a virus going round" "its time of year" at most if I say I have ear and throat pain they check it.

    In 4 years the only time I have had actual support is when a locum is on, last year I went to my doctor 3 times in 2 months and kept being told I have a virus, it will go away and 4th time I saw a locum who said I had a chest infection/virus and gave me a inhaler and thought I should get blood tests done. Went back a few weeks later a little better but still coughing and my normal doctor didnt even check notes and went "its a virus" I told her about the inhaler and she then looked at the notes and went "oh yes, that was a few weeks ago, just keep using that then"

    And a few months before I badly broke my arm, and was in agony and my doctor just prescribed pain killers without checking, eventually saw another locum who said he thought along with the broken arm I had a broken collarbone as the bone was warped! My normal doctor didn't even check, and I also mentioned sleep issues and he referred me to respiritory unit at hospital for sleep apnea (which I had been enquiring about for years with my normal doctor to get the "its a virus" line) So without him referring me would of got nowhere.

    Anytime I was ill since then my current doc now adds "well it might be due to your sleep apnea, so wait a few months"

    Anyway now on sleep apnea breathing mask and pump and felt dizzy to point of faint with it for first 2 weeks so asked my doctor for an appointment, due to snow had to cancel and didn't get another appointment for 5 days, in meantime I phoned NHS 24 who sent me to a out of hours surgery.

    Spoke to doctor there and he was shocked I hadn't been getting regular blood tests as well as mentioning my body hair, and cysts on body are signs of something tounge twisting so put on notes for my GP to get me blood tests as well as refer me back to respiritory at hospital for a different reason (linked to sleep apnea) as I shouldn't be struggling to breath with the new mask.

    Saw my actual doctor today, didnt even bring up the out of hours one, at end of session I mentioned it and the blood tests and just got "oh yes we saw notes" and that she didn't think blood tests were needed!

    I could change surgeries but only 2 other available to me in town, one has a far worse rep than my doctor.

    So am I asking too much of my GP or am I getting messed around?
Page 1
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 6th Mar 18, 7:17 PM
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    rach_k
    • #2
    • 6th Mar 18, 7:17 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Mar 18, 7:17 PM
    I think it's hard for people online to say one way or another. You could be somebody with medical issues and a GP who ignores you or you could be a hypochondriac in fine health and a GP who knows that, but you'd say the same to us either way - we can't tell!

    Whatever the situation, if you're not happy with your GP can you change to a different doctor at your current practice? At the three practices I've been with, you get to choose what doctor you see rather than seeing your 'own' GP each time, so perhaps try that if moving is difficult.
    • theoretica
    • By theoretica 6th Mar 18, 7:42 PM
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    theoretica
    • #3
    • 6th Mar 18, 7:42 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Mar 18, 7:42 PM
    Your GP is certainly not making you feel cared for, which is important.
    But a banker, engaged at enormous expense,
    Had the whole of their cash in his care.
    Lewis Carroll
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 6th Mar 18, 7:59 PM
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    dekaspace
    • #4
    • 6th Mar 18, 7:59 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Mar 18, 7:59 PM
    I think it's hard for people online to say one way or another. You could be somebody with medical issues and a GP who ignores you or you could be a hypochondriac in fine health and a GP who knows that, but you'd say the same to us either way - we can't tell!

    Whatever the situation, if you're not happy with your GP can you change to a different doctor at your current practice? At the three practices I've been with, you get to choose what doctor you see rather than seeing your 'own' GP each time, so perhaps try that if moving is difficult.
    Originally posted by rach_k
    All 3 are just as bad, its a health centre with like 2 practises in (used to be 3) hence why its so bad, the nurses are shared with both surgeries and also run things like womans and sexual health clinics so if blood tests do need done you wait 1-2 weeks for appointment and have to get form from doctor, walk to main reception, hand in form, book appointment.

    If I was 0.1 miles away from where I am would be classed as a different town which has excellent surgeries.

    But considering in past few years I have had a massive mole removed, history of testosterone and hormonal problems, previous GPs statements confirming I have mental health and physical problems its not that I should be seen as a hypochondriac by them,

    What I do tend to notice is the GPs at mine seem to prefer older clients, I seem to be one of the few under 40/50 clients they have from past experience.

    And when I go in they chat to the older clients and I hear (not intentionally) things like how they get on well with the doctor, had home visits, how the doctor goes out of their way to help them.

    Could be the doctors at mine treat patients who have been with them for decades really well.
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 6th Mar 18, 8:41 PM
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    rach_k
    • #5
    • 6th Mar 18, 8:41 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Mar 18, 8:41 PM
    I would have thought it unlikely that you would have three bad doctors in one practice. I can understand if they're bad at admin or you have to wait for appointments or something but three bad at the actual medicine all in one place?

    I also think it's unlikely that you're experiencing age discrimination. That tends to be the other way round.

    Is it possible that it's your perception of them that's the problem rather than the doctors themselves? If others seem happy, it might be something to consider.

    Regardless, if you're unhappy just move. What else would you like to happen? You could try booking an appointment to discuss your perceptions and they may be able to explain why they haven't done things you've wanted, but I suspect you won't ever be happy there so is it worth it?
    • Ames
    • By Ames 6th Mar 18, 9:33 PM
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    Ames
    • #6
    • 6th Mar 18, 9:33 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Mar 18, 9:33 PM
    I would have thought it unlikely that you would have three bad doctors in one practice. I can understand if they're bad at admin or you have to wait for appointments or something but three bad at the actual medicine all in one place?

    I also think it's unlikely that you're experiencing age discrimination. That tends to be the other way round.

    Is it possible that it's your perception of them that's the problem rather than the doctors themselves? If others seem happy, it might be something to consider.

    Regardless, if you're unhappy just move. What else would you like to happen? You could try booking an appointment to discuss your perceptions and they may be able to explain why they haven't done things you've wanted, but I suspect you won't ever be happy there so is it worth it?
    Originally posted by rach_k
    Oh I can absolutely believe it. At my last surgery there were at least three who were bad at the medicine part, plus bad admin and what seemed to be a policy of 'don't make referrals even when requested by a hospital consultant'.

    I changed in September and can't believe how different my new ones are. Today a different service called them with concerns, I got a phonecall within half an hour and an appointment a couple of hours after that.

    So I echo others - changing GP surgery is probably your best bet. Have you contacted the ones in the next town to see if they'll take you despite being just over the border? It can't hurt to ask, although procedures might be different in Scotland.

    Or would moving to that town be a possibility, solving your housing and GP issues in one?
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 6th Mar 18, 9:59 PM
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    dekaspace
    • #7
    • 6th Mar 18, 9:59 PM
    • #7
    • 6th Mar 18, 9:59 PM
    I would have thought it unlikely that you would have three bad doctors in one practice. I can understand if they're bad at admin or you have to wait for appointments or something but three bad at the actual medicine all in one place?

    I also think it's unlikely that you're experiencing age discrimination. That tends to be the other way round.

    Is it possible that it's your perception of them that's the problem rather than the doctors themselves? If others seem happy, it might be something to consider.

    Regardless, if you're unhappy just move. What else would you like to happen? You could try booking an appointment to discuss your perceptions and they may be able to explain why they haven't done things you've wanted, but I suspect you won't ever be happy there so is it worth it?
    Originally posted by rach_k
    All but one seems friendly, or at least friendlyish it feels more like each time you go in they feel like im wasting their time has been occasions with one in particular does seem to have mixed moods, either totally grumpy or happy to help!(but still not doing much)

    I went from an amazing GP in old town to ok at best at this surgery, really had to fight for anything.

    The problem with moving is out of frying pan into the fire! Im not 100% sure on the other surgery in the health centre but another actual surgery in town is hated by everyone I spoke to each person saying they don't like benefit claimaints in there (to be honest I think thats because thats the surgery the substance abusers use from what I heard)

    And when I say bad, when things get done they do get done and fast like when I didn't take no for an answer when I wanted CBT it just seems they don't seem to want to diagnose anything.

    I mean as I say they were the GPs that made me go cold turkey on antidepressants and hormones as they said they don't think I need them (despite not giving me blood tests to confirm) and told me the times I had a chest infection nothing was wrong or it was just the time of year etc.
    • Ames
    • By Ames 6th Mar 18, 10:51 PM
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    Ames
    • #8
    • 6th Mar 18, 10:51 PM
    • #8
    • 6th Mar 18, 10:51 PM
    In England there's a website where patients review GP surgeries, I assume there's one in Scotland. Maybe if you google 'reviews of x GP' you'll get a better idea of what they're like and whether it's worth moving?

    I put off moving from my old one for years, I really wish I'd done it when I first started thinking the old one was useless.

    One thing I've learned though is that 'friendly' means nothing with GPs. My old one was very friendly, very sympathetic, said lots... but did nothing.
    Unless I say otherwise 'you' means the general you not you specifically.
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 6th Mar 18, 10:57 PM
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    dekaspace
    • #9
    • 6th Mar 18, 10:57 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Mar 18, 10:57 PM
    Yes that seems to be what mine does, nicey nicey to your face (apart from that one I mentioned) but never gets things done. Like I say the locums every time I have had them is only time I get anywhere, just like the out of hours surgery I went to the other day was very sympathetic and own words "if you were my patient id get blood tests done straight away" stating things he noticed like body hair and cysts were signs of something I can't pronounce.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 6th Mar 18, 11:24 PM
    • 2,677 Posts
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    Red-Squirrel

    What I do tend to notice is the GPs at mine seem to prefer older clients, I seem to be one of the few under 40/50 clients they have from past experience.
    Originally posted by dekaspace
    That won't be the case, it's just that older people are more likely to be there because they are more likely to need to be, especially if you go a lot during normal working hours.
    • rach_k
    • By rach_k 7th Mar 18, 10:55 AM
    • 1,233 Posts
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    rach_k
    Why on earth would they not like benefit claimants? What difference does it make to them? You don't pay them after all. Would they even know? As you said, maybe the substance abuse aspect is the real reason. If that doesn't apply to you, disregard it.

    I've seen locums a few times for myself and the kids and I do find them more likely to prescribe, diagnose or refer, but I think that's because they won't see you again so they like to get the box ticked that you've been treated. There's nothing wrong with that, but your regular doctors are in a better position to monitor you over time and reach a diagnosis that way - perhaps more with more accuracy in general. When we've seen locums it's been hit and miss - we always come away feeling like things have been dealt with but it's not always been dealt with in the right way for the longer term. That's why we have regular doctors after all.

    Regardless, you're not happy but you've had some good suggestions: Ask another practice if they will take you even though you're outside their area; change to another local one; ask if you can discuss your concerns with your current doctor or just continue as you are. I'm not sure what else you want people to say. We can't say whether you are right or your doctor is right or neither.
    • avogadro
    • By avogadro 7th Mar 18, 11:50 AM
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    avogadro
    I would have thought it unlikely that you would have three bad doctors in one practice.
    Originally posted by rach_k
    Oh I can absolutely believe it.
    Originally posted by Ames
    At my previous surgery most if not all of the GPs were useless! Thankfully I was able to change surgeries.

    OP I would try and change to the better surgery if I were you, though you may have to insist a little. 0.1 miles is not very far and if you agree to no home visits they may take you on.
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 7th Mar 18, 12:27 PM
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    dekaspace
    Why on earth would they not like benefit claimants? What difference does it make to them? You don't pay them after all. Would they even know? As you said, maybe the substance abuse aspect is the real reason. If that doesn't apply to you, disregard it..
    Originally posted by rach_k
    From what I have heard from various people about that surgery is that if someone on benefits needs something like a report or letter for a disability assessment the GPS get quite grumpy with them, not just one not just even two even three people have said it., and generally treated like the person is wasting the GPs time, to be fair seems almost same issues I am getting at mine bar the actual grumpiness from the GPS about benefit issues again more than one has told me they have gone to that GP mentioning they have like a ESA assessment and the DWP may contact the GP and they refuse to get involved and say its not their problem.

    At my previous surgery most if not all of the GPs were useless! Thankfully I was able to change surgeries.

    OP I would try and change to the better surgery if I were you, though you may have to insist a little. 0.1 miles is not very far and if you agree to no home visits they may take you on.
    Originally posted by avogadro
    I asked around originally when I moved here, all the GPs the next town over told me they only cover their own town even apologised for it one even said the same, I was literally on the border for the services so couldn't be seen.
    • Red-Squirrel
    • By Red-Squirrel 7th Mar 18, 1:04 PM
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    Red-Squirrel
    From what I have heard from various people about that surgery is that if someone on benefits needs something like a report or letter for a disability assessment the GPS get quite grumpy with them, not just one not just even two even three people have said it., and generally treated like the person is wasting the GPs time, to be fair seems almost same issues I am getting at mine bar the actual grumpiness from the GPS about benefit issues again more than one has told me they have gone to that GP mentioning they have like a ESA assessment and the DWP may contact the GP and they refuse to get involved and say its not their problem.
    Originally posted by dekaspace
    GPs aren't always happy about having to do letters for benefits etc. because they feel like they are being asked to work for the government and use their time propping up bureaucracy rather than actually helping patients who need medical care.

    That said, its not the claimant's fault so they shouldn't be letting their frustration show too much! Although it sounds like this is just rumour.
    • jenniewb
    • By jenniewb 7th Mar 18, 1:23 PM
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    jenniewb
    There are many comments already so accept my apologies if this has already been said or is stating the obvious, but different GPs will work in different ways as with many professions.


    You have experienced something that did work for you and are now experiencing a way of working that doesn't work for you, if I were in your position (and without making this reply too lengthy with examples, I have been in the past), vote with your feet and ask either for a different GP at the same surgery or find a new surgery.


    It may be at an inconvenience to you if you need to travel further or take time to find someone who works a way you find fits, but it does mean that gnawing feeling of stress or anxiety that something is being missed or ignored wont be as prominent.


    If you need help finding a new GP the NHS website will have information which can help but for me I just changed who I saw at the same surgery- despite their being from the same service, I've found GPs at my local surgery (for an example) work differently enough to go from having a bit of a break down during one appointment (long story involving a long wait and a lot of "chronic"-their description, pain which later turned out to be a "very obvious"-words of the consultant, stress fracture which could have been requested for if on the grounds of my prior diagnosis of osteoporosis.)


    I hope you feel able to move because waiting for a GP to realise they are not serving you or even failing you is a bit like waiting for the sky to turn red with green stripes. GPs have hundreds or even a thousand patients on their books and I can imagine many like yourself will fall through the net. This is not to say the service isn't working, just to say that it does rely on you using your gut to decide to move if something isn't working or doesn't feel right and if it all turns out the next person you see also doesn't feel helpful, move again. Bare in mind the previous GP you saw did work for you, you know it can be done and will have something to compare to. You shouldn't be looking for perfect, just something that covers what you need to keep you well.
    • jack_pott
    • By jack_pott 7th Mar 18, 2:28 PM
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    jack_pott
    I would have thought it unlikely that you would have three bad doctors in one practice.
    Originally posted by rach_k
    It's nothing to do with the probability of three at one practice, once you have been labelled a timewaster or a hypochondriac you will be treated the same way by all who read it. There's no way you will ever be able to find that out, let alone challenge it or change it, so your healthcare is blighted for life.

    My heart condition was diagnosed by a consultant in Resus who presumably hadn't read my notes carefully enough, and wasn't "on message", so by the time I got to cardio outpatients they just lied, and denied that I had ever been taken to A&E.

    It's so obvious what's going on, because of difference from the staff who haven't had prior sight of your records.

    it just seems they don't seem to want to diagnose anything.
    Originally posted by dekaspace
    GPs offered bribes not to refer patients to hospital.

    Why on earth would they not like benefit claimants?
    Originally posted by rach_k
    I recall an interview with a woman who fell on hard times and had to move from a middle class area to a sink estate. She found that she went from being involved and consulted about her healthcare, to getting what she was given like it or lump it.

    "Diagnostic overshadowing" is the technical euphemism for doctor's prejudice. Google it. Patients with a mental health history are four times more likely to have their physical healthcare neglected until it becomes an emergency.

    I asked around originally when I moved here, all the GPs the next town over told me they only cover their own town
    Originally posted by dekaspace
    I got told "we don't poach other doctor's patients".
    I'm not upset that you lied to me, I'm upset that from now on I can't believe you.
    Friedrich Nietzsche
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 7th Mar 18, 5:47 PM
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    dekaspace
    It's nothing to do with the probability of three at one practice, once you have been labelled a timewaster or a hypochondriac you will be treated the same way by all who read it. There's no way you will ever be able to find that out, let alone challenge it or change it, so your healthcare is blighted for life.

    My heart condition was diagnosed by a consultant in Resus who presumably hadn't read my notes carefully enough, and wasn't "on message", so by the time I got to cardio outpatients they just lied, and denied that I had ever been taken to A&E.

    It's so obvious what's going on, because of difference from the staff who haven't had prior sight of your records.



    GPs offered bribes not to refer patients to hospital.



    I recall an interview with a woman who fell on hard times and had to move from a middle class area to a sink estate. She found that she went from being involved and consulted about her healthcare, to getting what she was given like it or lump it.

    "Diagnostic overshadowing" is the technical euphemism for doctor's prejudice. Google it. Patients with a mental health history are four times more likely to have their physical healthcare neglected until it becomes an emergency.


    I got told "we don't poach other doctor's patients".
    Originally posted by jack_pott
    The out of hours one said he didn't have access to my full records, so sounds about right, put it this way I didn't go to the doctors for about 3 years at one point at old town then got a good doctor (very laid back, even used to rub her feet in the middle of the consultation!) she was the one who got me a psychologist, the autism assessment, diagnosed the skin cancer,(benign) got me MRI scan, regular bloods. referred me to local mental health group, wrote letters for DWP etc.

    Current one I heard didn't even respond to DWP requests, never does bloods, and all 3 just give you "its a virus" line or at most check chest and ears and say they look clear they only do something when it reaches its extreme and even then not much else.

    Anyway tried changing surgeries today to a nice new one, should of guessed as its a nice one, and in posh part of town they have a backlog of people wanting to register so turning new patients away UNLESS you are new to the area which feels unfair in some ways.
    • GlasweJen
    • By GlasweJen 7th Mar 18, 9:07 PM
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    GlasweJen
    I've went from the opposite, living in a rubbish area and diagnosed as a munchausens victim to living in a posh area and married to a doctor, my care hasn't changed much at all.

    Some GPS won't do any letters for benefits at all - mine won't. It's not part of their service and no amount of money will get them to do it. It takes up time that they're not willing to give up.

    Do you actually have a medical condition that you're not being treated for? If so write to the practice manager asking that you're recommenced on the appropriate treatment, if they refuse you can complain and if that gets you nowhere you can write to your health board and ask them to intervene and assign you a GP as your relationship has broken down where you are. They won't move you to another health board area so if you're on the border between 2 boards you might be assigned a GP miles away even if a GP surgery is closer but belongs to the other health board.
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    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 7th Mar 18, 11:18 PM
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    teddysmum
    First of all,doctors are encouraged not to use antidepressants for more than a short span as they don't cure depression, but help people to begin coping with the condition. Many have been accused of giving tablets instead of help to get better.


    What do you call regular blood tests ? It's common to have regular ones , at first, for measurement or diagnostic purposes, but then they are only needed at longer intervals,as checks..


    I have one annual batch of test for diabetes, hypothyroidism , B12 and associated functions (eg liver) ,with the odd repeat after 12 weeks,should a result be very abnormal. Testing more often would be costly, with no worthwhile benefit.
    • dekaspace
    • By dekaspace 10th Mar 18, 5:44 PM
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    dekaspace
    Sorry forgot I posted here, regular doesn't mean weekly even monthly but its now been almost 4 years since my last blood test, i used to get weekly with hormone, even every 2-3 months would be understandable or even when I get to the cold months of year when I am at my worst. For the anti depressants I was outright told cold turkey as they don't believe in prescribing them and everything can be cured with diet, routine and a good nights sleep.

    Hard to tell about medical conditions as each time over the past 10 years if not my entire life I only generally get diagnosed if I get blood tests or something is obvious, but the times I do get blood tests they say something isn't right (but the rest come back perfect) thats how I got the hormonal tests done, and I was still getting checks done at old surgery when I tranferred (had to cancel bloods arranged) but new GP just outright refused.
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