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  • FIRST POST
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 6th Mar 18, 9:25 AM
    • 8,336Posts
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    pmduk
    Who has had Cataract Surgery?
    • #1
    • 6th Mar 18, 9:25 AM
    Who has had Cataract Surgery? 6th Mar 18 at 9:25 AM
    I'm having cataract surgery on Friday and have got to the point where I'm panicking! Can anyone tell me what their post-op experiences were like, please?
    Last edited by pmduk; 07-03-2018 at 7:09 PM. Reason: typo
Page 1
    • calleyw
    • By calleyw 6th Mar 18, 10:54 PM
    • 8,739 Posts
    • 15,727 Thanks
    calleyw
    • #2
    • 6th Mar 18, 10:54 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Mar 18, 10:54 PM
    My mum had one done about 5ish years ago.

    She freaked out about it to the point I thought she would not go.

    She went she said they shine a bright light in your eye so can see nothing and you can feel a bit of pulling and tugging. But that was that.

    Think she wished she had , had it done earlier as made such a difference for her.

    Good luck and try not to panic to much about it.

    Yours

    Calley X
    Hope for everything and expect nothing!!!

    Good enough is almost always good enough -Prof Barry Schwartz

    If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try -Seth Godin
    • Iamzee
    • By Iamzee 6th Mar 18, 11:04 PM
    • 61 Posts
    • 70 Thanks
    Iamzee
    • #3
    • 6th Mar 18, 11:04 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Mar 18, 11:04 PM
    My dad had his cataract surgery almost 3 years ago. I don't think it would be helpful to panic. There's nothing to worry as it is a very common eye operation. You'll be okay.
    • Jaymie kate
    • By Jaymie kate 6th Mar 18, 11:24 PM
    • 65 Posts
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    Jaymie kate
    • #4
    • 6th Mar 18, 11:24 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Mar 18, 11:24 PM
    No need to panic. that's the least that you should feel. My sister had cataract surgery before and it all went pretty good. The thought of it can be scary, but in reality the surgery is simple, safe, and quick, with a very low rate of complications. No big deal. Good luck and relax! You'll do just fine.
    • wondercollie
    • By wondercollie 6th Mar 18, 11:43 PM
    • 1,179 Posts
    • 8,874 Thanks
    wondercollie
    • #5
    • 6th Mar 18, 11:43 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Mar 18, 11:43 PM
    I worked in my hospital's cataract unit for nearly a decade. Your fears are normal. Relax and breathe. If you are truly unable to relax talk to the doctor who freezes your eye. He's in charge of pain control and is an anaesthesiologist. Ours would offer Ativan or Valium to relax the patients. Just enough to take the edge of.

    If you don't ask you don't get.
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 7th Mar 18, 9:19 AM
    • 8,336 Posts
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    pmduk
    • #6
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:19 AM
    • #6
    • 7th Mar 18, 9:19 AM
    I'm not worried (too much) about the surgery, it's the likelihood of pain afterwards, I'm a wimp (I think most men are with things like this!). I've already let them know I'd like a sedative at my pre-op assessment.
    • giraffe69
    • By giraffe69 7th Mar 18, 10:24 AM
    • 2,348 Posts
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    giraffe69
    • #7
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:24 AM
    • #7
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:24 AM
    Pain free a the time. Very little discomfort afterwards. Wore a patch for 48 hours. Tired to keep away from bright lights for a short while. I didn't fancy someone going near my eye but in the end it was no problem.
    • Toothsmith
    • By Toothsmith 7th Mar 18, 10:29 AM
    • 8,846 Posts
    • 10,525 Thanks
    Toothsmith
    • #8
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:29 AM
    • #8
    • 7th Mar 18, 10:29 AM
    To be honest - this is a procedure that always scares the will ies out of me!

    I have had many patients who have had it done though - and every single one describe a short, pain-free, comfortable operation that was way better than anything I do to them
    How to find a dentist.
    1. Get recommendations from friends/family/neighbours/etc.
    2. Once you have a short-list, VISIT the practices - dont just phone. Go on the pretext of getting a Practice Leaflet.
    3. Assess the helpfulness of the staff and the level of the facilities.
    4. Only book initial appointment when you find a place you are happy with.
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 7th Mar 18, 11:29 AM
    • 8,336 Posts
    • 6,154 Thanks
    pmduk
    • #9
    • 7th Mar 18, 11:29 AM
    • #9
    • 7th Mar 18, 11:29 AM
    No offence intended Toothsmith, I have an extreme phobia of dentists. Everything is better than a trip there!
    • indsty
    • By indsty 7th Mar 18, 5:00 PM
    • 364 Posts
    • 895 Thanks
    indsty
    I had cataract surgery 4 weeks ago. Anaesthetic drops into the eye, lie down for 15 minutes whilst they do procedure, no problems at all. You don't feel or see anything at all. You will probably be offered a quick acting sedative if you want it, but unless you are physically shaking I honestly can't see the need. I arrived at 7.30 a.m. and was on my way home at 10 a.m.

    Two lots of drops to put into the eye for a week, then just one lot for another three weeks.

    Day 1 the eye was watery (they give you a patch to wear for the first 24 hours), but no real pain, just a bit uncomfortable.
    Day 2 - wearing off
    Day 3 - back to normal.
    • adandem
    • By adandem 7th Mar 18, 8:17 PM
    • 3,482 Posts
    • 4,715 Thanks
    adandem
    My mom had hers done, her first eye was her worst affected. It was fine, just a little sore and watery for a day or two. Nothing at all after her second eye.
    She can't believe the difference it's made. She's scrapped her varifocals for some very weak reading glasses. You'll be fine.
    • sillyvixen
    • By sillyvixen 7th Mar 18, 11:08 PM
    • 3,135 Posts
    • 4,824 Thanks
    sillyvixen
    My grandfather has his cataracts done (one eye at 89 years and the other just after his 90 th birthday) it made such a difference to him and made him wonder why he had resisted it for so many years.
    Dogs return to eat their vomit, just as fools repeat their foolishness. There is no more hope for a fool than for someone who says, "i am really clever!"
    • teddysmum
    • By teddysmum 7th Mar 18, 11:30 PM
    • 9,037 Posts
    • 5,386 Thanks
    teddysmum
    I will have to have the procedure at some time and will panic, as that is the way I am, but also I know, after having an intensive examination because of a possibility of a retinal detachment (It didn't happen ),that I felt very dizzy and very nauseous, probably because I have spinal nerve problems.


    However,two friends on an internet group both had the procedure,one readily having a repeat and the other quite happy for when her next is due. Both were delighted by the results.
    • Nodding Donkey
    • By Nodding Donkey 7th Mar 18, 11:40 PM
    • 2,532 Posts
    • 2,142 Thanks
    Nodding Donkey
    Don't fall for the 'local anaesthetic' spiel, go for a general.

    I had a local and it felt like exactly what it was, someone poking you in the eye with a sharp pointy thing.
    • wondercollie
    • By wondercollie 7th Mar 18, 11:53 PM
    • 1,179 Posts
    • 8,874 Thanks
    wondercollie
    Don't fall for the 'local anaesthetic' spiel, go for a general.

    I had a local and it felt like exactly what it was, someone poking you in the eye with a sharp pointy thing.
    Originally posted by Nodding Donkey
    General anaesthetic for a simple procedure is overkill. The only patients that have had a GA on my unit are either having a bilateral procedure, demented, mentally challenged or was so nervous they kicked on of the nurses.

    GA's are not a simple procedure and require more staff, more time in hospital, and a major work up in this age group to due heart disease, diabetes, and lung issues.

    A good topical anaesthetic, a mild sedative and you are good to go. All of our patients were told to let the surgeon know if they started to feel anything and the drops would be topped up. There is no point in telling the nurse post op that the procedure hurt.
    • pmduk
    • By pmduk 8th Mar 18, 7:33 AM
    • 8,336 Posts
    • 6,154 Thanks
    pmduk
    Don't fall for the 'local anaesthetic' spiel, go for a general.

    I had a local and it felt like exactly what it was, someone poking you in the eye with a sharp pointy thing.
    Originally posted by Nodding Donkey
    Because of other health issues, general anaesthetics are ill-advised for me, unfortunately. I've had other orthopaedic procedures which have had to be done under local (or regional) anaesthesia.

    This clinic is needle-free and uses anaesthetic drops which I'm assured work equally well. I'm hoping so. I'll let you know in 2 or 3 days
    Last edited by pmduk; 08-03-2018 at 7:37 AM.
    • cuddles123
    • By cuddles123 28th Apr 18, 12:45 PM
    • 1,380 Posts
    • 6,991 Thanks
    cuddles123
    Hi,

    Has anyone had cataract surgery that wasn't successful?
    I was very short sighted and was advised by a consultant that my sight should be corrected to -1 as 'my brain couldn't cope with perfect vision'
    We had a long discussion about why I needed good distance vision due to balance problems, and cannot wear glasses long term because of Hyperhidrosis. I was advised that my distance vision would be excellent, but may need weak reading glasses for extended periods of close work.

    Long story but first eye became blurred after 3 days, due to inflammation, so second eye done sooner rather than later.
    Same thing happened, but no inflammation.
    Have spent 4 months putting in drops and attending appointments, to be told on Thursday that with the lenses I have been given I will never see clearly!

    I am making a formal complaint as I was wrongly advised and have been so worried an unable to do anything for so long. I will need to have laser surgery to correct my sight, but this is not available on the NHS so I'm claiming for the cost, plus the associated cost of taxi fares, loss of earnings etc.

    Just wondering if anyone else is very short sighted and been given the same advice as me?
    Jack of all trades ... Master of none
    • Sncjw
    • By Sncjw 28th Apr 18, 4:59 PM
    • 1,770 Posts
    • 1,049 Thanks
    Sncjw
    Did they not give you a form to sign with the risks listed on it?
    • sheramber
    • By sheramber 28th Apr 18, 7:34 PM
    • 4,674 Posts
    • 3,505 Thanks
    sheramber
    the first eye that my husband had done has gone cloudy due to posterior capsular opacification.
    He has the option of laser treatment. He also could not have prefect vision restored as his brain would not cope with the difference.

    Frequently, within months to years after surgery, the thin lens capsule may become cloudy, causing blurred vision after cataract surgery. You may have the sensation that the cataract is returning because your vision is becoming blurry again. This process is termed posterior capsular opacification, or a "secondary cataract." To restore vision, a laser is used in the office to painlessly create a hole in the cloudy bag (posterior capsulotomy). This procedure takes only a few minutes in the office, and vision usually improves immediately.

    If the lenses are the problem why can they not replace them.
    • powerful_Rogue
    • By powerful_Rogue 28th Apr 18, 7:37 PM
    • 3,396 Posts
    • 4,972 Thanks
    powerful_Rogue
    General anaesthetic for a simple procedure is overkill. The only patients that have had a GA on my unit are either having a bilateral procedure, demented, mentally challenged or was so nervous they kicked on of the nurses.

    GA's are not a simple procedure and require more staff, more time in hospital, and a major work up in this age group to due heart disease, diabetes, and lung issues.

    A good topical anaesthetic, a mild sedative and you are good to go. All of our patients were told to let the surgeon know if they started to feel anything and the drops would be topped up. There is no point in telling the nurse post op that the procedure hurt.
    Originally posted by wondercollie
    I had this operation 2 years ago under GA. As I was only 32, they said it had to be under GA - Which I was more then happy about!
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