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  • FIRST POST
    • DanSpooner
    • By DanSpooner 5th Mar 18, 1:11 PM
    • 20Posts
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    DanSpooner
    Employer asking me to work Weekend + Mon-Fri
    • #1
    • 5th Mar 18, 1:11 PM
    Employer asking me to work Weekend + Mon-Fri 5th Mar 18 at 1:11 PM
    Hi there,

    I currently work in a Monday-Friday (9am-5.30pm) job and I've been asked to work at an event one weekend this month in addition to my normal working hours. This means that I'll be working from Monday 12th March with no days off until Friday 23rd March (12 days straight) and I've been offered no days off to counter the fact that I'm working that weekend.

    I'm on a salary where I am (as an employee, not self employed) and I won't be getting any extra money for working then. My contract does say the following:

    "In addition to these hours, you will be expected to work such additional hours as the company sees fit to enable you to carry out your duties effectively. For example, this may involve working the occasional weekend or weekdays at trade shows or staying overnight if visiting customers a significant distance away."

    The work on that weekend will be for a trade show which is 150 miles away so I'll be staying there from Friday (16th) night until Tuesday (20th). So I'll have a significant amount of time away from home during that period.

    Do I have any rights to ask for 2 days off to give me a break? I do understand that my contract says I'm expected to work at these events but I feel that I would need at least some time off to refresh (Plus I'll need time to do things such as wash work clothes as I only have a certain amount etc.).

    Any help would be much appreciated.
Page 2
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 5th Mar 18, 4:27 PM
    • 3,012 Posts
    • 6,049 Thanks
    Smodlet
    You won't burn out, unless you are ill to start with. I've done back to back days over months and lived to tell the tale!

    As a business owner, I'd think it was perfectly acceptable to ask for a bit of time off after the event. Sometimes with everything else to think about, I don't always spot that someone may be working more than they 'should', so we have a general thing where people are supposed to point out to management if they are doing more than they should.
    Originally posted by bugslet

    Hmm but there are strict rules within the haulage industry as to how many hours a driver, certainly, can work within a 24 hour period for obvious reasons.

    If the OP's contract stipulates week end working in addition to normal hours (are days off in lieu not mentioned therein?) I fail to see how they have any grounds for complaint. If he can't find the opportunity to do laundry except on week ends, buy some more shirts, fgs!
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • Queenbean
    • By Queenbean 5th Mar 18, 4:38 PM
    • 7 Posts
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    Queenbean
    Unfortunately, it is within the working time directive and stated in your contract. So my understanding is you will have to do the hours and not expect anything in return.
    • scd3scd4
    • By scd3scd4 5th Mar 18, 4:56 PM
    • 824 Posts
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    scd3scd4
    "In addition to these hours, you will be expected to work such additional hours as the company sees fit to enable you to carry out your duties effectively. For example, this may involve working the occasional weekend or weekdays at trade shows or staying overnight if visiting customers a significant distance away."

    It says nothing about doing it for free, be it over-time of time back in lieu. They are taking the pixx.
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 5th Mar 18, 5:14 PM
    • 2,670 Posts
    • 3,819 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    It says nothing about doing it for free, be it over-time of time back in lieu. They are taking the pixx.
    Originally posted by scd3scd4
    You're not doing it for free - you're doing it as part of your annual salary. That clause (or variations of it) are standard in employment contracts for anyone who isn't paid by the hour.
    • Loanranger
    • By Loanranger 5th Mar 18, 5:21 PM
    • 2,106 Posts
    • 5,523 Thanks
    Loanranger
    I've done numerous weekend aways at exhibitions and such like and never once even considered taking time off to recover. It was just part of my job.
    • stator
    • By stator 5th Mar 18, 5:38 PM
    • 6,232 Posts
    • 4,116 Thanks
    stator
    I just hope you don't catch a short virus from one of the many customers you're a shaking hands with over the weekend. You might have to stay off work for a couple days afterwards. Wouldn't that be awful
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 5th Mar 18, 5:45 PM
    • 3,012 Posts
    • 6,049 Thanks
    Smodlet
    "In addition to these hours, you will be expected to work such additional hours as the company sees fit to enable you to carry out your duties effectively. For example, this may involve working the occasional weekend or weekdays at trade shows or staying overnight if visiting customers a significant distance away."

    It says nothing about doing it for free, be it over-time of time back in lieu. They are taking the pixx.
    Originally posted by scd3scd4
    Have you read the OP's contract?
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • bugslet
    • By bugslet 5th Mar 18, 6:12 PM
    • 6,132 Posts
    • 29,531 Thanks
    bugslet
    Hmm but there are strict rules within the haulage industry as to how many hours a driver, certainly, can work within a 24 hour period for obvious reasons.

    If the OP's contract stipulates week end working in addition to normal hours (are days off in lieu not mentioned therein?) I fail to see how they have any grounds for complaint. If he can't find the opportunity to do laundry except on week ends, buy some more shirts, fgs!
    Originally posted by Smodlet
    Indeed, we are tightly regulated, but we have a 24 hour weekly rest rather than 45 hours, but not every weekend. 99.9% we know what hours people have done, but sometimes we forget and we expect drivers to pipe up! So it is different, but the principle is the same, mention it to the boss, it could be something he's not given any thought to.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 5th Mar 18, 8:04 PM
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    If you salary is only just above minimum wage; this is unfair.

    If your salary is 80K a year, this is to be expected.

    Somewhere in the middle is a line.

    I would say if you are paid anything much above 40K, outside London, a very occasional weekend away is not in any way outside what you should expect when accepting the job. I am rather surprised at how many people seem to assume this is unreasonable without knowing your salary. Have I missed something?
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 5th Mar 18, 8:08 PM
    • 2,537 Posts
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    "In addition to these hours, you will be expected to work such additional hours as the company sees fit to enable you to carry out your duties effectively. For example, this may involve working the occasional weekend or weekdays at trade shows or staying overnight if visiting customers a significant distance away."

    It says nothing about doing it for free, be it over-time of time back in lieu. They are taking the pixx.
    Originally posted by scd3scd4
    Again, it might well not say it's for free because it isn't for free, the salary covers it. If he is on 100K a year do you still think it's taking the !!!!?
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 5th Mar 18, 8:10 PM
    • 2,537 Posts
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Unfortunately, it is within the working time directive and stated in your contract. So my understanding is you will have to do the hours and not expect anything in return.
    Originally posted by Queenbean
    Not expect anything in return except the salary he gets paid for a job that includes this in the contract.

    Not everyone is paid by the hour!!
    • scd3scd4
    • By scd3scd4 6th Mar 18, 5:58 AM
    • 824 Posts
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    scd3scd4
    Have you read the OP's contract?
    Originally posted by Smodlet

    Have you? Where does it say its for free with not even time in lieu.
    • scd3scd4
    • By scd3scd4 6th Mar 18, 6:00 AM
    • 824 Posts
    • 701 Thanks
    scd3scd4
    Again, it might well not say it's for free because it isn't for free, the salary covers it. If he is on 100K a year do you still think it's taking the !!!!?
    Originally posted by ScorpiondeRooftrouser



    Lets stick to the facts not your imagination. Is he on 100K and where in the contract does it say its for free with not even the time in lieu!!!!!!!???


    Was he told in the interview that was expected!!!!!!?????
    • scd3scd4
    • By scd3scd4 6th Mar 18, 6:11 AM
    • 824 Posts
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    scd3scd4
    You're not doing it for free - you're doing it as part of your annual salary. That clause (or variations of it) are standard in employment contracts for anyone who isn't paid by the hour.
    Originally posted by ReadingTim



    Not in the Oil industry they are not. Many on salary are still paid over-time above their contract hours. Its not taken as read.
    • scd3scd4
    • By scd3scd4 6th Mar 18, 6:17 AM
    • 824 Posts
    • 701 Thanks
    scd3scd4
    Dan.


    If its once a year you may have to swallow it for the sake of your job............but I would not be a sheep. There is nothing wrong in having a word with your boss and asking why you cannot even have the time back. Was this explained in the interview.


    Personally I would not care what others do or don't do in their jobs. This is your job!
    Last edited by scd3scd4; 06-03-2018 at 6:34 AM.
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 6th Mar 18, 7:27 AM
    • 16,683 Posts
    • 41,270 Thanks
    FBaby
    It's one weekend a year, it's really no big deal. Maybe it's an opportunity for you, getting to know other people in the trade, getting your name around. Networking can be seen as a benefit. Maybe you can look at it from that perspective.
    • CC-Warrior
    • By CC-Warrior 6th Mar 18, 8:06 AM
    • 295 Posts
    • 497 Thanks
    CC-Warrior
    Whatever happened to work to live and not live to work.
    Employers need to back off - they do not own us despite what the contract says. We're not going to get this time back.

    I wouldn't work more than 7 days in a row and if that causes upset in dear Management then that's too bad, personal health and a healthy work-life balance is more important.

    The working culture is sick.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 6th Mar 18, 9:12 AM
    • 2,537 Posts
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Lets stick to the facts not your imagination. Is he on 100K and where in the contract does it say its for free with not even the time in lieu!!!!!!!???


    Was he told in the interview that was expected!!!!!!?????
    Originally posted by scd3scd4

    Do you understand what "if" means? The only person making assumptions and ploughing on as though they are correct is you.
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 6th Mar 18, 9:13 AM
    • 2,537 Posts
    • 4,043 Thanks
    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Whatever happened to work to live and not live to work.
    Employers need to back off - they do not own us despite what the contract says. We're not going to get this time back.

    I wouldn't work more than 7 days in a row and if that causes upset in dear Management then that's too bad, personal health and a healthy work-life balance is more important.

    The working culture is sick.
    Originally posted by CC-Warrior
    Have you accepted a job which requires very occasional weekend work and a commensurate salary?

    Should people not have the right to be well paid for having a weekend away from home every few months?
    • ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    • By ScorpiondeRooftrouser 6th Mar 18, 9:14 AM
    • 2,537 Posts
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    ScorpiondeRooftrouser
    Not in the Oil industry they are not. Many on salary are still paid over-time above their contract hours. Its not taken as read.
    Originally posted by scd3scd4
    FFs. It depends on the salary. Why can't you understand?

    Many job have low salaries and paid overtime.

    Many other jobs have very high salaries and no paid overtime.

    Often the people in the latter are much better off than the people in the former.

    This is not difficult.
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