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    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 5th Mar 18, 7:34 AM
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    quantumlobster
    Radiator leak prior to exchange
    • #1
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:34 AM
    Radiator leak prior to exchange 5th Mar 18 at 7:34 AM
    Long time reader, first time poster.

    I'm in the process of selling my house and buying another one. Offers have been made and accepted on both properties, and the conveyancing process is in full swing - searches and surveys have been done. We have not yet exchanged.

    This morning we woke to find that the bleed valve on the top room radiator (it's a three-storey terrace) had popped out, and water was squirting out of the radiator at the wall. I found the little bolt that goes in the bleed valve and tightened it up, and the water has stopped.

    What do I need to do to keep this transaction on track? What would a buyer need from me to provide sufficient confidence that things have been made good?

    My current plan is to speak to the estate agent handling my sale and simply ask "what does the buyer need me to do to keep this on track?".

    I am happy to put this through the insurance or, failing that, pay for the work required to rectify.
Page 1
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 5th Mar 18, 7:49 AM
    • 25,069 Posts
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    Davesnave
    • #2
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:49 AM
    • #2
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:49 AM
    You haven't said what damage has been done.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • csgohan4
    • By csgohan4 5th Mar 18, 8:07 AM
    • 4,445 Posts
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    csgohan4
    • #3
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:07 AM
    • #3
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:07 AM
    repair the damage to the condition before the leak sounds reasonable.
    "It is prudent when shopping for something important, not to limit yourself to Pound land"
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 5th Mar 18, 8:38 AM
    • 17,395 Posts
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    AdrianC
    • #4
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:38 AM
    • #4
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:38 AM
    How does the bleed screw just pop out? The only way that can happen is if the threads are mullered. Assuming this is a normal steel panel rad with bosses for valves/plugs in each corner, then a new plug with bleed screw is dirt cheap, and quick and easy to fit.

    Then sort whatever damage has been done.
    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 5th Mar 18, 8:48 AM
    • 80 Posts
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    quantumlobster
    • #5
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:48 AM
    • #5
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:48 AM
    Embarrassingly I think it was only in by luck rather than judgement. This radiator is on the second floor and is subject to very low pressure, and we never really got it bled properly, and I think I never tightened it up after the last attempt. For the first time in a long time we had the heating on for an extended duration - 12 hours or more. My hypothesis is the radiator finally bled and lo, water did reach the top of the rad and pee out across the room.
    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 5th Mar 18, 8:49 AM
    • 80 Posts
    • 147 Thanks
    quantumlobster
    • #6
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:49 AM
    • #6
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:49 AM
    You haven't said what damage has been done.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    I think (hope!) it's just damp plaster.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 5th Mar 18, 8:54 AM
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    AdrianC
    • #7
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:54 AM
    • #7
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:54 AM
    In that case, all you need to do is re-tighten the screw, and let everything dry out.
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 5th Mar 18, 9:08 AM
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    bowlhead99
    • #8
    • 5th Mar 18, 9:08 AM
    • #8
    • 5th Mar 18, 9:08 AM
    In that case, all you need to do is re-tighten the screw, and let everything dry out.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    I would agree: if there is no ongoing leak, and no structural or cosmetic damage, there is no crisis. If the survey has already been done you are not going to get someone with a damp meter come round and say ooh these readings are through the roof. Keep the heating on for a week and you should be fine, assuming buyer doesn't want to come round for 'one last visit' to check things are as they remembered them before they sign the paperwork to exchange.

    Obviously if the water has done some cosmetic damage to the flooring or walls etc then you are asking your buyers to exchange on something which looks worse than when they agreed to pay you £x for it... so it's only fair to make it good and highlight it to them if making it good makes it look different.
    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 5th Mar 18, 9:21 AM
    • 80 Posts
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    quantumlobster
    • #9
    • 5th Mar 18, 9:21 AM
    • #9
    • 5th Mar 18, 9:21 AM
    Apologies: In my stressed state I forgot to mention that the buyer had arranged a damp & timber survey for last Thursday. That got snowed off, and it's now on this Thursday
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 5th Mar 18, 9:38 AM
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    silvercar
    How much water escaped?

    Remember to top up the boiler if you have a combi.
    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 5th Mar 18, 9:43 AM
    • 80 Posts
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    quantumlobster
    How much water escaped?

    Remember to top up the boiler if you have a combi.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    Hard to tell - a few litres? It's not a combi.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 5th Mar 18, 9:46 AM
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    AdrianC
    Whether it's a combi or not doesn't make a difference to the heating circuit, just the hot water.

    You should have a pressure gauge somewhere, probably on the boiler. If that's below 1 bar or so, you need to refill.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 5th Mar 18, 10:04 AM
    • 37,240 Posts
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    silvercar
    Whether it's a combi or not doesn't make a difference to the heating circuit, just the hot water.

    You should have a pressure gauge somewhere, probably on the boiler. If that's below 1 bar or so, you need to refill.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Non-combi's could just have a filler tank and not need any user action.

    For just a few litres, I would dry out as best you can and wait to see if the surveyor mentions it. If he does then you explain what happened. I don't think it's a big deal.
    • martindow
    • By martindow 5th Mar 18, 10:08 AM
    • 7,551 Posts
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    martindow
    Whether it's a combi or not doesn't make a difference to the heating circuit, just the hot water.

    You should have a pressure gauge somewhere, probably on the boiler. If that's below 1 bar or so, you need to refill.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Are you sure of this? My boiler doesn't have a gauge or if it does I haven't found it! I understood that the header tank in the loft provides the pressure.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 5th Mar 18, 10:08 AM
    • 17,395 Posts
    • 15,762 Thanks
    AdrianC
    Non-combi's could just have a filler tank and not need any user action.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    They could, but most - like ours - would be pressurised in exactly the same way.
    • blackshirtuk
    • By blackshirtuk 5th Mar 18, 10:16 AM
    • 518 Posts
    • 292 Thanks
    blackshirtuk
    Apologies: In my stressed state I forgot to mention that the buyer had arranged a damp & timber survey for last Thursday. That got snowed off, and it's now on this Thursday
    Originally posted by quantumlobster
    Doubt the damp survey would flag a damp patch on a second floor wall,

    However if you are worried just leave the heating on for a few days with the window open a touch to allow ventilation of the vapour. Or heatgun/hairdryer on the damp bit till it dries

    Or alternatively buy or rent a dehumidifier.
    • armchaireconomist
    • By armchaireconomist 5th Mar 18, 12:36 PM
    • 224 Posts
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    armchaireconomist
    Be honest with what's happened and tell them what you've done/will do to remedy it before exchange.


    No point hiding the truth for them to find it, and assume something serious (structural damage etc.) as the only possible reason for you wanting to be quiet over it.
    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 5th Mar 18, 12:54 PM
    • 80 Posts
    • 147 Thanks
    quantumlobster
    I have spoken to the estate agent who will be in touch with the buyer; it is my intent to review the situation tonight and decide whether it's an insurance job or not. In any event, I will be ensuring that things are put back to how they were.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 5th Mar 18, 1:20 PM
    • 3,037 Posts
    • 6,101 Thanks
    Smodlet
    Apologies: In my stressed state I forgot to mention that the buyer had arranged a damp & timber survey for last Thursday. That got snowed off, and it's now on this Thursday
    Originally posted by quantumlobster
    I have spoken to the estate agent who will be in touch with the buyer; it is my intent to review the situation tonight and decide whether it's an insurance job or not. In any event, I will be ensuring that things are put back to how they were.
    Originally posted by quantumlobster

    Now I'm confused. If all that has happened is a wall and the floor got a soaking, as might happen if you were washing the floor and knocked the bucket over, why would you need to involve an insurance company? Just mop it up and let it dry out, as has been said several times already.

    If there is a serious damp problem which this leak has made worse, that is a completely different scenario. Is this the reason for the survey on Thursday?
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • quantumlobster
    • By quantumlobster 5th Mar 18, 1:39 PM
    • 80 Posts
    • 147 Thanks
    quantumlobster
    Now I'm confused. If all that has happened is a wall and the floor got a soaking, as might happen if you were washing the floor and knocked the bucket over, why would you need to involve an insurance company? Just mop it up and let it dry out, as has been said several times already.
    Originally posted by Smodlet
    Perhaps I am over-reacting. I am concerned because there has been some seepage between floors (down the same wall). I am not an expert in these things and don't know whether it's "not serious" or "really very serious". Apologies for causing confusion!

    If there is a serious damp problem which this leak has made worse, that is a completely different scenario. Is this the reason for the survey on Thursday?
    There isn't a serious damp problem; we have lived in the house for 20 years and it's dry (or at least not noticeably so - wallpaper etc stays on, no excessive condensation, etc). My assumption is that the buyer's lender requested the damp/timber survey because the house is 110 years old.
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