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  • FIRST POST
    • YoungBlueEyes
    • By YoungBlueEyes 4th Mar 18, 11:20 PM
    • 188Posts
    • 177Thanks
    YoungBlueEyes
    What would put you off a house...?
    • #1
    • 4th Mar 18, 11:20 PM
    What would put you off a house...? 4th Mar 18 at 11:20 PM
    I've just read the fake grass thread, and it got me thinking.
    What kind of things would be a deal breaker for you?
    I don't mean terrible area/apalling neighbours/massive cracks in the roof and water left to pour in for months etc.
    More like - is a bit of peeling wallpaper ok? Original period windows that could do with some love? Is double glazing a must? Carpets the colour of a Dairy Milk bar? No shower in the bathroom? An unloved garden?
    What do people expect to have to do when they buy a (not new built) house?
Page 7
    • victoriavictorious
    • By victoriavictorious 10th Mar 18, 9:25 PM
    • 204 Posts
    • 287 Thanks
    victoriavictorious
    Having lived in the US for many years, where single-storey houses are not only common but the norm, I was surprised at the amount of distaste a lot of people show in the UK to bungalows. I've seen almost a sneering snobbery towards them at times.

    I owned two "brick ranches" (essentially bungalows) in NC and TN and loved both of them. They just had a great flow when moving around inside, and when moving from inside to the garden.

    They seem to be associated with being old here, I suppose because of the single-level design. I have noticed when searching for houses that they often also have less floor space and a smaller garden than many two-storey houses, which for me is more of an issue than being single-storey per se.
    Originally posted by dunroving
    The reason I dislike bungalows is because they never have any character.
    The only bungalow I ever recall as having had any charm, was an unmodernised 1920s one - straight out of Metroland - with steps leading up to it from a beautfully-planted and large rockery garden.
    It was subsequently sold to someone who immediately ripped out the lovely old front garden and replaced it with crazy paving, replaced the original leaded light windows with upvc, and slapped beige pebbledash all over the black & white mock Tudor front.
    It then looked like every other bungalow you've ever seen.
    • caronoel
    • By caronoel 10th Mar 18, 9:29 PM
    • 851 Posts
    • 1,092 Thanks
    caronoel
    Any house that backs onto a public park, school, or a lane way.

    It's a security risk, and God knows who could be hanging around after dark.
    • DairyQueen
    • By DairyQueen 11th Mar 18, 1:01 AM
    • 246 Posts
    • 402 Thanks
    DairyQueen
    Interesting thread.

    After 40 years of property ownership I have learned my 'no-nos':
    - urban location
    - noisy (too many people, businesses, traffic, trains, planes)
    - overlooked at the back
    - without a bathroom on the same floor as the bedrooms (or the capacity to install one at reasonable cost)
    - in a rundown location
    - open-plan living-room/kitchen
    - front door opening directly into the living room (last home had this). Draughts always make themselves felt, nowhere to hang coats, and dirt is constantly walked into the living room
    - too big (there is such a thing)
    - no outside, private space at the back
    - a big garden (I don't have time to spend all summer maintaining it)
    - limited, fitted storage and no capacity to install more
    - minus a decent-sized kitchen/diner
    - no working fireplace.

    .... and my personal pet hate.....

    - character properties that have been 'modernised' rather than sensitively improved (shudder). Such as 'upgrades' that remove or replace original fireplaces, cornices, windows, kitchen, bathrooms etc. with highly-stylised and/or 'maintenance-free' contemporary equivalents. The worst I ever saw on RM was a pretty, country cottage whose owners had removed all of the walls on the ground floor, installed a black-and-red kitchen, blocked the fireplace and replaced all of the original sashes with uPVC equivalents. It looked exactly like a new-build flat inside and languished on the market for two years before eventually being removed.

    No off-street parking isn't a problem as long as there is ample on-street close by.

    Couldn't care less about the cosmetics as long as the price is right, and many 'structural' issues are a great buying opportunity.
    • anonmum
    • By anonmum 11th Mar 18, 3:45 AM
    • 57 Posts
    • 86 Thanks
    anonmum
    Price, general size, location most important.
    hi,
    My finances meant I couldn't be too picky on what I bought generally (couldn't get and didn't want a huge mortgage), just had to have two beds and be in a mile roughly ish of daughters college (I don't drive) and be liveable condition!

    My house has coronation street stone cladding (in yellow), is a middle terrace, only back entrance is across 2 neighbours, 1 neighbour has access over my garden (only used for bins thankfully), garden is small, concreted and with artificial grass, kitchen is smaller than would like, no downstairs loo, suicidally steep staircases - in fact has nearly everything I would have put down on my ABSOLUTE NO NO list lol...but it was affordable, had enough bedrooms etc.

    Some of the stuff I don't like I can change, some stuff I can't and will have to put up with! Looking at the positives its easy enough to pick my house out of the row of terraces with the cladding and I don't have to mow any grass! lol

    helen x
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 11th Mar 18, 8:46 AM
    • 17,395 Posts
    • 15,762 Thanks
    AdrianC
    No-one's mentioned cellars though... Even if they are properly done and damp proofed etc, aren't they still just a bit creepy...? *shudder
    Originally posted by YoungBlueEyes
    Wish we had a cellar...
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Mar 18, 8:54 AM
    • 25,072 Posts
    • 92,633 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Wish we had a cellar...
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    My BiL had a cellar and didn't know it, or he certainly wouldn't have been driving a digger on top of it!

    When a small hole in the yard suddenly appeared, we discovered a room 22' x 8'. It was actually a disused reservoir from at least 150 years ago, but we didn't know that at the time; we just knew it was 'old.'

    Then we had the awkward job of hiding it from the building inspector and hostile neighbour, either of whom would have had an interest for different reasons.....

    It's now a store, and the entrance is outwith the house that was built, just in case.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • ancientofdays
    • By ancientofdays 11th Mar 18, 9:20 AM
    • 1,607 Posts
    • 19,077 Thanks
    ancientofdays
    I really like the smell of cellars, I've never had one but I think my grandparents might have done, sone ancient rellies anyway.

    A family I know locally have made their cellar into a TV watching room, so their actual sitting room is quiet and peaceful.
    I was jumping to conclusions and one of them jumped back
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 11th Mar 18, 9:38 AM
    • 30,592 Posts
    • 57,832 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    We had a wonderfully dry 12 x 12 cellar in our terraced house that we had for forty years. It had power and heating. We used it for storage.

    The house in Spain that we had for eight years had a 10 x 8 storeroom off the kitchen. It had huge thick walls, part of the mountain the house was built on in the corner and a hole in the wall for ventilation. That too was a great storeroom

    Although I love my bungalow, I really miss my cellar and my storeroom.
    Last edited by seven-day-weekend; 11-03-2018 at 9:40 AM.
    • tiernsee
    • By tiernsee 11th Mar 18, 11:15 AM
    • 253 Posts
    • 295 Thanks
    tiernsee
    Interesting thread.


    I think over the years my wants have changed. Now musts would include detached, parking (no shared drives or permit parking), not too remote (walking distance to shops), more than one toilet and very little outside space.


    Decorations really don't matter, they can be changed but fundamentals like location cannot be. Previously I would have said a bath is a must, but now just having a shower or a wet room would not put me off.
    • victoriavictorious
    • By victoriavictorious 11th Mar 18, 11:24 AM
    • 204 Posts
    • 287 Thanks
    victoriavictorious
    Interesting thread.

    After 40 years of property ownership I have learned my 'no-nos':
    - urban location
    - noisy (too many people, businesses, traffic, trains, planes)
    - overlooked at the back
    - without a bathroom on the same floor as the bedrooms (or the capacity to install one at reasonable cost)
    - in a rundown location
    - open-plan living-room/kitchen
    - front door opening directly into the living room (last home had this). Draughts always make themselves felt, nowhere to hang coats, and dirt is constantly walked into the living room
    - too big (there is such a thing)
    - no outside, private space at the back
    - a big garden (I don't have time to spend all summer maintaining it)
    - limited, fitted storage and no capacity to install more
    - minus a decent-sized kitchen/diner
    - no working fireplace.

    .... and my personal pet hate.....

    - character properties that have been 'modernised' rather than sensitively improved (shudder). Such as 'upgrades' that remove or replace original fireplaces, cornices, windows, kitchen, bathrooms etc. with highly-stylised and/or 'maintenance-free' contemporary equivalents. The worst I ever saw on RM was a pretty, country cottage whose owners had removed all of the walls on the ground floor, installed a black-and-red kitchen, blocked the fireplace and replaced all of the original sashes with uPVC equivalents. It looked exactly like a new-build flat inside and languished on the market for two years before eventually being removed.

    No off-street parking isn't a problem as long as there is ample on-street close by.

    Couldn't care less about the cosmetics as long as the price is right, and many 'structural' issues are a great buying opportunity.
    Originally posted by DairyQueen
    ^^^All of this ^^:. Could've been written by me!
    • TamsinC
    • By TamsinC 11th Mar 18, 1:52 PM
    • 218 Posts
    • 189 Thanks
    TamsinC
    Having spent years and years living in MOD properties - my big no-no's are

    an MOD property
    bland and no character
    overlooked
    no parking
    crowded area/ rundown area

    Must haves are
    decent sized kitchen can be linked to a dining area not important though
    a separate sitting room
    upstairs and downstairs WC
    utility space (doesn't have to be a separate room can be around a corner)
    space and light
    decent garden as many of the ones we have had have been postage stamps and we never get the benefit of doing anything to them
    Last edited by TamsinC; 11-03-2018 at 2:03 PM.
    • YoungBlueEyes
    • By YoungBlueEyes 11th Mar 18, 9:26 PM
    • 188 Posts
    • 177 Thanks
    YoungBlueEyes
    I've spent years in MOD houses too, and once I got used to them they were ok.
    I'd live in one again cos the ones we lived in were all decent layouts and solidly built. We were offered the chance to buy our first one - they were being sold off after the camp closed. It was a lovely big 3 bed corner plot, proper sized rooms, huge garden with a fab shed, on the outskirts of town. It could have been ours for £25k but we were silly young newly-weds about to be posted to the other end of the country so we said no At the height of the market before it all crashed they were selling for 10+ times that.

    There ought to be a website that just does ex MOD properties...
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 12th Mar 18, 2:42 PM
    • 31,709 Posts
    • 19,995 Thanks
    DCFC79
    What are peoples thoughts on this house with the kitchen at the front and living room at the rear ? I'm more used to a house where its the other way round ?
    Can people stop loaning money/being a guarator to family/friends, it rarely ends well and you lose out as your money is gone or you get shafted with being a guarantor.
    • dunroving
    • By dunroving 12th Mar 18, 2:54 PM
    • 1,175 Posts
    • 824 Thanks
    dunroving
    What are peoples thoughts on this house with the kitchen at the front and living room at the rear ? I'm more used to a house where its the other way round ?
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    Looking at the floor plan, it makes sense, otherwise you'd have a tiny living room. I think there is a lot to be said for having a living room at the back - quieter, not overlooked by nosy people on the street, etc.

    Always think resale, though. I think some people would be very put off by a front door opening onto a kitchen - even if it does make sense, as above.
    (Nearly) dunroving
    • TamsinC
    • By TamsinC 12th Mar 18, 3:48 PM
    • 218 Posts
    • 189 Thanks
    TamsinC
    I've spent years in MOD houses too, and once I got used to them they were ok.
    I'd live in one again cos the ones we lived in were all decent layouts and solidly built. We were offered the chance to buy our first one - they were being sold off after the camp closed. It was a lovely big 3 bed corner plot, proper sized rooms, huge garden with a fab shed, on the outskirts of town. It could have been ours for £25k but we were silly young newly-weds about to be posted to the other end of the country so we said no At the height of the market before it all crashed they were selling for 10+ times that.

    There ought to be a website that just does ex MOD properties...
    Originally posted by YoungBlueEyes
    There is a site that sells just MOD properties - Annigton Homes - remember though since the sell off 20 odd years ago where Annigton bought all the properties and the MOD rent them back, Carrillion Amey have been the people keeping the houses 'working', they have had no preventative measures taken on them, no maintenance, only firefighting issues - for example over a year ago I noticed rot at the bottom of some boxing in the downstairs WC, I guessed the soil pipe was behind the boxing. I called them out and they decided before they even went to the house I was mistaken and was talking about the upstairs bathroom and mould. SO they sent a workman with the wrong info, tools and skills. He put in a call for a surveyor to look at it as he was flummoxed. 3 months later she turned up and told me the rot at the bottom of the boxing was to do with a guttering problem from the chimney stack (completely different part of the house). SO she signed the job in the WC off and went away. After another 2 months we called the job in again. A man came out took one look inside the boxing and said 'It's asbestos, I'm not touching that' - anther 6 weeks of arguing with CA as they said it wasn't asbestos even though it was on the asbestos register for the house. Eventually nearly a year after the initial report they sent an asbestos firm to check and funny old thing - it is asbestos - at this point the rot has extended quite a way. Another 6 weeks and the asbestos team turn up to take away the boxing revealing a cracking cast iron soil pipe and some rather disgusting muck at the bottom rotting the wood and cracking the concrete, Another 3 week and they send a man to replace the soil pipe and box it in again. 3 weeks later again and we are still waiting for the being to be finished (a bag of plaster sits in our WC now) and the redecoration to be done - the removal of the asbestos pulled off wallpaper, plaster and skirting - and I won't be charged on March Out for it. The houses are now crumbling to the core now - when they get handed back in about 3 years time it is estimated that each house will need a minimum of 40K spent on it to get it up to liveable standards. Some will need considerably more, if not be demolished for being uneconomical to repair. When they are sold they go on the open market at market prices and MOD personnel get a 5% maximum discount (dependant on how many years service you have done).
    Last edited by TamsinC; 12-03-2018 at 3:52 PM.
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 12th Mar 18, 4:48 PM
    • 31,709 Posts
    • 19,995 Thanks
    DCFC79
    Looking at the floor plan, it makes sense, otherwise you'd have a tiny living room. I think there is a lot to be said for having a living room at the back - quieter, not overlooked by nosy people on the street, etc.

    Always think resale, though. I think some people would be very put off by a front door opening onto a kitchen - even if it does make sense, as above.
    Originally posted by dunroving
    Yes Ill have to keep that in mind.

    Thanks.
    Can people stop loaning money/being a guarator to family/friends, it rarely ends well and you lose out as your money is gone or you get shafted with being a guarantor.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 12th Mar 18, 6:37 PM
    • 15,634 Posts
    • 43,376 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    What are peoples thoughts on this house with the kitchen at the front and living room at the rear ? I'm more used to a house where its the other way round ?
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    1. Partly depends which was is best/worst for sun coming into the house.

    2. Per se - I'd probably prefer it. Mainly in order that my sitting room was that bit more private and I could be in it (even with tv or music on) and no-one could tell from the front of the house that I was in.

    Also I would be better able to spot any visitors I was expecting by keeping an eye out the kitchen window for them.

    So - yeah...all else being equal on a choice between two houses and one had the sitting room at the back and the other had it at the front = the deciding factor for me would be that I'd choose the one with the sitting room at the back.
    WAY TO GO IRELAND! - WELCOME TO THE 21ST CENTURY

    • Waterlily24
    • By Waterlily24 12th Mar 18, 6:42 PM
    • 917 Posts
    • 493 Thanks
    Waterlily24
    What are peoples thoughts on this house with the kitchen at the front and living room at the rear ? I'm more used to a house where its the other way round ?
    Originally posted by DCFC79

    We had a house with the kitchen at the front and I must say I loved it. It was in cul de sac so not very busy.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 12th Mar 18, 7:17 PM
    • 25,072 Posts
    • 92,633 Thanks
    Davesnave
    What are peoples thoughts on this house with the kitchen at the front and living room at the rear ? I'm more used to a house where its the other way round ?
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    Our kitchen/diner's at the front, but it has a better aspect than that house, where the kitchen faces west, meaning too much afternoon/evening sun. Ours faces north, so it's relatively cool, even in summer time; a good thing when many appliances create heat.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • steph2901
    • By steph2901 12th Mar 18, 7:36 PM
    • 302 Posts
    • 188 Thanks
    steph2901
    What are peoples thoughts on this house with the kitchen at the front and living room at the rear ? I'm more used to a house where its the other way round ?
    Originally posted by DCFC79
    I've never lived in a house with the kitchen at the front, but the house I'm buying does have the kitchen at the front. The back garden is south facing though, which is what I want.
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