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  • FIRST POST
    • YoungBlueEyes
    • By YoungBlueEyes 4th Mar 18, 11:20 PM
    • 174Posts
    • 169Thanks
    YoungBlueEyes
    What would put you off a house...?
    • #1
    • 4th Mar 18, 11:20 PM
    What would put you off a house...? 4th Mar 18 at 11:20 PM
    I've just read the fake grass thread, and it got me thinking.
    What kind of things would be a deal breaker for you?
    I don't mean terrible area/apalling neighbours/massive cracks in the roof and water left to pour in for months etc.
    More like - is a bit of peeling wallpaper ok? Original period windows that could do with some love? Is double glazing a must? Carpets the colour of a Dairy Milk bar? No shower in the bathroom? An unloved garden?
    What do people expect to have to do when they buy a (not new built) house?
Page 5
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 6th Mar 18, 6:47 PM
    • 25,016 Posts
    • 92,520 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Conservatories, I just don't get putting a glass room that is cold and unusable for half the year unless you spend a fortune heating it at the back of your house. .
    Originally posted by kylej64
    There are conservatories and conservatories.

    Ours is better built than most, so today it was heating the house.

    Even last week, when it was -6c outside and blowing a gale, we were working in the conservatory, kept at a reasonable 19c by the wood burner in the living room. Admittedly our fuel for that's mostly free, but we were slightly amazed by the ease in which we were able to use the conservatory in such inclement conditions.

    Christmas dinner was in there too, so I'm not sure when these unusable months are? Maybe in the evenings of winter, because we wouldn't heat then, when there are other warm rooms.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • Tootling
    • By Tootling 6th Mar 18, 7:46 PM
    • 34 Posts
    • 26 Thanks
    Tootling
    I can't think of many things on the actual house that would put me off, most things can be changed. For me it would all be location and outside related. Busy road, shared access, commercial neighbours & not enough plot to buffer if next door decide to build to the boundary.
    My last house had a lovely hallway but narrow rooms as a result, this house has a lobby and wider room space and frankly we have not missed a hallway, in fact it seems a bit of a waste of expensive square metres.
    I would also be put of by a newly refurbished or new kitchen & bathroom because I know from experience that it is likely to be a cheap to sell job. This house had a new bathroom that had to be taken out because it leaked.
    Originally posted by maisie cat
    Assuming it's not a medical restriction, that one's easy to address.
    Originally posted by AdrianC
    Yeah, I would like to learn but I'm rather anxious about cars (Car/horse accident when younger) so even if i do learn i am not wholly confident how much of a driver I'll be!
    • boliston
    • By boliston 6th Mar 18, 7:57 PM
    • 2,610 Posts
    • 2,160 Thanks
    boliston
    1) cul-de-sac location - i do not want to feel like i'm on a set for brookside or neighbours
    2) on an estate
    3) too far from a station (10 minute walk max)
    4) too far from shops (5 minute walk max)
    • KittenChops
    • By KittenChops 7th Mar 18, 10:41 AM
    • 105 Posts
    • 64 Thanks
    KittenChops
    Our next purchase MUST have / be...

    An upstairs bathroom - I wouldn't even view a house with a downstairs bathroom unless there was room to move it upstairs and still have 3+ bedrooms.

    A downstairs shower room (or space to put one in) as my mother, sister and mother in law are disabled.

    A separate downstairs reception room to be used as an occasional bedroom for the above.

    A very good sized garden - I've lost count of the number of houses I've looked at online which were advertised as having a 'generous garden' but really didn't. Not too bothered about orientation, because if it's a decent enough size it'll get full sun somewhere, but it mustn't be massively overlooked. I could even get over it being paved if it was with the right house.


    Nowhere near a busy road or railway as we have two cats, one of which is getting on a bit and her eyesight and hearing aren't good.

    A hallway - the front door can't open directly into a reception room, and ideally I'd like a porch too - to have an airlock for the cats.

    A master bedroom able to fit a large king size bed in it as my husband is fed up with me taking up the whole of our double bed every night!

    Space around it - ideally rural but not isolated. I'd like there to be somewhere I can buy milk etc within walking distance and I don't want to be hearing my neighbours sorting their recycling at 11pm or parking at 4am like I can now.

    We wouldn't buy a house on more than two floors as there's only the two of us and the master bedroom is normally on the second floor meaning the first floor won't be used except when we have guests, plus the extra set of stairs puts me off.

    We would consider a dormer bungalow where only the master bedroom is on the first floor, as long as there's a bathroom up there too.


    So... looking at the above... I think this might be a very long house search!


    On another note, seeing as our house is pebble dashed, I'm really interested to hear why some people might rule it out based on that - aesthetics or worried about what might be behind it? It didn't put me off from buying it, but then it's a two bed semi in an area where 99% of other two bed houses are narrow Victorian terraces.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 7th Mar 18, 10:48 AM
    • 15,589 Posts
    • 43,305 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Maybe there's an element of what one is used to coming into play here? - ie re pebbledashing.

    My expectations (south of England person) are that a house will have brick walls basically. But I am personally also used to pebbledashing - so it probably wouldnt bother me too much. It is pretty normal in some parts - and I'm betting you're in Cornwall or just across the border....in which case other people will be used to it.

    Given choice - I'll avoid rendered houses - mainly because I'm not used to them and they need re-painting at intervals. I do wonder whether the rendering might need attention/money at some point. I've had to buy a rendered house where I've moved to now - as so many of them are and there wasn't much choice available (ie by the time I've got price restrictions on what I can afford). I'd be willing to bet that people from this area don't think twice about the house being rendered.

    Where I would dig my heels in pointblank and refuse to buy at all would be if the house was just bare concrete blocks (whether painted or otherwise). That's so different to my norm that it wouldn't even be considered. Fugly....

    EDIT; Just read a Daily Mail article from 2014 on pebbledashed houses. In that - the EA advised a Pembrokeshire household that had pebbledashing - duly grey and austere-looking version of it - to paint their house white. It had spent ages on the market - and then sold pretty quickly thereafter.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 07-03-2018 at 10:56 AM.
    It's ok, I didn't believe in reincarnation the last time, either.
    • KittenChops
    • By KittenChops 7th Mar 18, 11:25 AM
    • 105 Posts
    • 64 Thanks
    KittenChops
    Maybe there's an element of what one is used to coming into play here? - ie re pebbledashing.

    My expectations (south of England person) are that a house will have brick walls basically. But I am personally also used to pebbledashing - so it probably wouldnt bother me too much. It is pretty normal in some parts - and I'm betting you're in Cornwall or just across the border....in which case other people will be used to it.

    Given choice - I'll avoid rendered houses - mainly because I'm not used to them and they need re-painting at intervals. I do wonder whether the rendering might need attention/money at some point. I've had to buy a rendered house where I've moved to now - as so many of them are and there wasn't much choice available (ie by the time I've got price restrictions on what I can afford). I'd be willing to bet that people from this area don't think twice about the house being rendered.

    Where I would dig my heels in pointblank and refuse to buy at all would be if the house was just bare concrete blocks (whether painted or otherwise). That's so different to my norm that it wouldn't even be considered. Fugly....

    EDIT; Just read a Daily Mail article from 2014 on pebbledashed houses. In that - the EA advised a Pembrokeshire household that had pebbledashing - duly grey and austere-looking version of it - to paint their house white. It had spent ages on the market - and then sold pretty quickly thereafter.
    Originally posted by moneyistooshorttomention

    Nope, we're in the south east! We have considered having the house painted but we'll see what happens first. We have a couple of viewings today and another couple lined up for the weekend...
    • swindiff
    • By swindiff 7th Mar 18, 12:27 PM
    • 305 Posts
    • 128 Thanks
    swindiff
    Maintenance charges would put me off which seems to be the in thing for new builds these days.
    Not enough private parking spaces, minimum of 2, ideally 3 or more.
    No Garage
    No En-Suite for the master bedroom (I have to get up to pee at night at my age lol)
    Separate dining room, in my experience we hardly ever used one, would much prefer a large kitchen diner.
    Rendered external walls. Current house is rendered with K-Rend (which you are not supposed to paint) and just ages far too quickly, much prefer brick or stone.
    • LadyL2013
    • By LadyL2013 7th Mar 18, 1:06 PM
    • 157 Posts
    • 120 Thanks
    LadyL2013
    Out of interest why do stairs in the living room put people off so much?
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 7th Mar 18, 1:18 PM
    • 2,715 Posts
    • 3,875 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    Out of interest why do stairs in the living room put people off so much?
    Originally posted by LadyL2013
    A friend with stairs off the living room and 2 children tells me they are a nightmare (I think she was just referring to the stairs!) as the children sit on the landing and watch tv instead of going to sleep.
    Last edited by Silvertabby; 07-03-2018 at 1:39 PM.
    • VintageHistorian
    • By VintageHistorian 7th Mar 18, 1:29 PM
    • 335 Posts
    • 2,151 Thanks
    VintageHistorian
    We were once really put off a house by the vendor! Two bed semi with a very odd interior layout, I think it used to be a two-up two-down, but had been reorganised a little bit when an indoor bathroom was finally installed. The vendor's family had lived there for decades, she and her partner had owned the attached house and had already sold it, her Mum had lived in the one we were viewing. There was also a third house built across the gardens of the two attached houses, which the vendor was going to keep and rent out.

    She was very nice but it was clear that she was still hugely attached to the house. Complained that a building company had come round and started talking about the changes they could make inside the house, so she refused to sell to them. Because she still owned the third house we quickly realised that anything we wanted to do to the place would be subject to extensive scrutiny, and probably complaints if we decided to do anything that required planning permission (such as add an extension).

    Ultimately we were persuaded by both sets of parents to buy somewhere with off-street parking, but doubts had already been sown by the vendor so the parking was just the icing on the cake.
    "You won't bloom until you're planted" - Graffiti spotted in Newcastle.

    Always try to be nice, but never fail to be kind - Doctor Who

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    • boliston
    • By boliston 7th Mar 18, 1:43 PM
    • 2,610 Posts
    • 2,160 Thanks
    boliston
    Out of interest why do stairs in the living room put people off so much?
    Originally posted by LadyL2013
    it could make the room drafty and you are heating an area that would only need minimal heat
    • kittie
    • By kittie 7th Mar 18, 1:56 PM
    • 11,952 Posts
    • 74,716 Thanks
    kittie
    no small stream , even if seasonal, not anwhere close and that ruled out the two houses I have seen on RM, both with capped wells and been on there for quite a while and another had a tiny stream running downhill, down the side of the garden
    • Judi
    • By Judi 7th Mar 18, 2:06 PM
    • 16,095 Posts
    • 69,917 Thanks
    Judi
    A large garden would put me off a house. A postage stamp sized garden front and back would suit me fine.
    'Holy crap on a cracker!'
    • Bvv
    • By Bvv 7th Mar 18, 2:18 PM
    • 24 Posts
    • 4 Thanks
    Bvv
    My husband and I recently bought a flat. We know this is not a forever home, just a home for the next few years, so didn't want anything that required too much work. The main turn offs were:

    No gas central heating. Don't mind having an old boiler that needs replacing, but did not want to pay to have an entire heating system installed.

    Weird lay-outs (e.g. having to go through the main bedroom to access second bedroom).

    Basement flats. There's lots of these around where we live, and they were tempting as they tend to be more affordable, but I don't think I could deal with the constant darkness inside (let alone potential damp).

    No space to park our bicycles. We have a car as well, but use our bikes far more often, so that was a more important consideration!

    Noise potential, e.g. looked at one ground floor flat where the bedroom was right next to the front entrance to the building.

    As others have said: front door that opens straight into the living room.

    Overpowering smoke smell (or other nasty smells).
    • StumpyPumpy
    • By StumpyPumpy 7th Mar 18, 3:10 PM
    • 1,249 Posts
    • 3,359 Thanks
    StumpyPumpy
    Out of interest why do stairs in the living room put people off so much?
    Originally posted by LadyL2013
    I grew up in a house like that. Up the stairs was a small landing with bedrooms, loo and bathroom off.

    It meant that as a child when you went to bed you had to get to sleep with the sound of the TV or conversation coming through the bedroom door and it meant that you had to heat the stairs and landing if the living room was cold. When I got a bit older it meant I couldn't stagger up the stairs after an under-age trip to the pub without having to negotiate them in full view of parents and sneaking a girlfriend in was totally impossible! But perhaps worst of all was that whilst sitting in the living room you can hear, in seemingly amplified stereo anyone using the separate toilet at the top of the stairs.

    I'd never buy a house with that layout (although my parents still live there, so opinions can differ).

    SP
    Come on people, it's not difficult: lose means to be unable to find, loose means not being fixed in place. So if you have a hole in your pocket you might lose your loose change.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 7th Mar 18, 3:21 PM
    • 30,562 Posts
    • 57,703 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    There are conservatories and conservatories.

    Ours is better built than most, so today it was heating the house.

    Even last week, when it was -6c outside and blowing a gale, we were working in the conservatory, kept at a reasonable 19c by the wood burner in the living room. Admittedly our fuel for that's mostly free, but we were slightly amazed by the ease in which we were able to use the conservatory in such inclement conditions.

    Christmas dinner was in there too, so I'm not sure when these unusable months are? Maybe in the evenings of winter, because we wouldn't heat then, when there are other warm rooms.
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    We use our conservatory all year round too. It has some sort of special glass which keeps heat in in the winter and out in the summer. We heat it with a wall-mounted convector heater which has a thermostat and keeps it at a constant 15 degrees, obviously we can have it warmer if we wish. The heater is off a lot of the time because it doesn't often get lower than 15 degrees.

    My husband was working in there in the gales too

    We have a large garden so no problem there and it gives us more usable living space.
    Last edited by seven-day-weekend; 07-03-2018 at 3:26 PM.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 7th Mar 18, 3:22 PM
    • 5,188 Posts
    • 23,967 Thanks
    Slinky
    I grew up in a house like that. Up the stairs was a small landing with bedrooms, loo and bathroom off.

    It meant that as a child when you went to bed you had to get to sleep with the sound of the TV or conversation coming through the bedroom door and it meant that you had to heat the stairs and landing if the living room was cold. When I got a bit older it meant I couldn't stagger up the stairs after an under-age trip to the pub without having to negotiate them in full view of parents and sneaking a girlfriend in was totally impossible! But perhaps worst of all was that whilst sitting in the living room you can hear, in seemingly amplified stereo anyone using the separate toilet at the top of the stairs.

    I'd never buy a house with that layout (although my parents still live there, so opinions can differ).

    SP
    Originally posted by StumpyPumpy
    That's interesting, our new house has stairs out of the dining room, we haven't lived there yet apart from a couple of weeks when we were decorating for tenants, it appears we're lucky the stairs are in the dining room rather than the sitting room. I can't see me having problems sneaking somebody back in, since the only person that would be would be my OH.

    We pulled out of a house purchase where the vendor was also the neighbour and showed signs of being a control freak.
    • NeilCr
    • By NeilCr 7th Mar 18, 3:38 PM
    • 1,707 Posts
    • 2,282 Thanks
    NeilCr
    As I get older and creakier

    Things that would put me off in a house

    No downstairs loo. A godsend that I don't have to go up and down the stairs too often.

    Size. I live alone and don't want a big house to clean and maintain. I am quite happy with what I have re kitchen/living room being together. I don't have visitors round for dinner so it's only my cooking smells and me. I can watch TV while I'm cooking and quick and easy to get to the kettle

    Condition. As above I don't want to have to do up/repair anything. For that reason I prefer modern houses too. Well insulated

    A big garden with grass. Got a Courtyard now with decking

    No off street parking. Agree with previous posters. Very important while I stilll have a car

    Location

    Not in a town. I want to be near shops without having to drive

    Poor public transport. I am on a regular bus route here that goes to the station, hospital etc

    On a main road. I used to live on a busy main road and loved it. Not any more!
    Last edited by NeilCr; 07-03-2018 at 5:16 PM.
    • Tammykitty
    • By Tammykitty 7th Mar 18, 5:00 PM
    • 573 Posts
    • 1,196 Thanks
    Tammykitty
    What would put me off


    1 - open plan - I detest it, its cold, and I want to be able to close the door on my kitchen!


    2 - Main Road


    3 - Not a forever home - no room for children (If we are very lucky enough) or to convert downstairs rooms to bedrooms as we get older!
    Weight Loss Challenge
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    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 7th Mar 18, 5:05 PM
    • 25,016 Posts
    • 92,520 Thanks
    Davesnave
    We use our conservatory all year round too. It has some sort of special glass which keeps heat in in the winter and out in the summer.

    We have a large garden so no problem there and it gives us more usable living space.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    It's Celsius glass, I expect, which we have, and the rest of our conservatory's built to building regs, so even the floor's insulated.

    Many conservatories are badly built though, which is why they get the reputation they have, especially when installed by a cowboy firm. Those are numerous in an essentially unregulated industry.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're ready…..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
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