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  • FIRST POST
    • YoungBlueEyes
    • By YoungBlueEyes 4th Mar 18, 11:20 PM
    • 180Posts
    • 173Thanks
    YoungBlueEyes
    What would put you off a house...?
    • #1
    • 4th Mar 18, 11:20 PM
    What would put you off a house...? 4th Mar 18 at 11:20 PM
    I've just read the fake grass thread, and it got me thinking.
    What kind of things would be a deal breaker for you?
    I don't mean terrible area/apalling neighbours/massive cracks in the roof and water left to pour in for months etc.
    More like - is a bit of peeling wallpaper ok? Original period windows that could do with some love? Is double glazing a must? Carpets the colour of a Dairy Milk bar? No shower in the bathroom? An unloved garden?
    What do people expect to have to do when they buy a (not new built) house?
Page 3
    • Caraway90
    • By Caraway90 5th Mar 18, 6:40 PM
    • 30 Posts
    • 15 Thanks
    Caraway90
    Things that would be a no for me:
    - A north facing very shady garden
    - An extension on the back of a house which leaves an original room with no window. We looked around one where a room built on the back of the kitchen which just made the kitchen feel far too gloomy. It also had s north facing garden so was a define no!
    - A back garden backing onto a noisy road.
    FTB 2017
    • happyandcontented
    • By happyandcontented 5th Mar 18, 7:53 PM
    • 1,088 Posts
    • 2,128 Thanks
    happyandcontented
    My big no-no is being overlooked, I like complete privacy when sitting in the garden, so I would discount any house that didn't give me that.
    Other things would be:

    Miles from anywhere.
    Neighbours who didn't look after their properties.
    A Bungalow.
    Three storey houses.
    No downstairs loo
    Small kitchen
    Dark rooms.
    Tiny/no outside space
    No hallway.
    • Li0nhead
    • By Li0nhead 5th Mar 18, 7:57 PM
    • 14,622 Posts
    • 32,015 Thanks
    Li0nhead
    Houses that scream "I came with a free parking dispute!" As part of the sale, even in an area i am looking at, at a very attractive price.

    Note the message on the side of the house in the following:

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-52993233.html

    Screams parking dispute.
    Hi there! Weíve had to remove your signature. It was so good we removed it because we cannot think of one so good as you had and need to protect others from seeing such a great signature.
    • Kim kim
    • By Kim kim 5th Mar 18, 8:09 PM
    • 2,231 Posts
    • 3,347 Thanks
    Kim kim
    I would never choose to buy a house that you have to go through the living room to get to the kitchen.
    Nor would I want to find myself in one that had the stairs coming off the living room.

    As you can tell, I see the point of hallways lol
    Originally posted by remembermee
    I donít like houses without hallways.
    I also donít like downstairs bathrooms.
    • ancientofdays
    • By ancientofdays 6th Mar 18, 6:33 AM
    • 1,598 Posts
    • 18,953 Thanks
    ancientofdays
    There are lots of compromises that I'd put up with with a plan of making changes in the long run.

    The really off putting things for me would be

    Bathroom or a bedroom accessible only via another bedroom

    Total open plan

    But the biggest turnoff for me woukd be a bungalow
    I was jumping to conclusions and one of them jumped back
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 6th Mar 18, 6:42 AM
    • 30,585 Posts
    • 57,786 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    What's wrong with bungalows????
    • Catsacor
    • By Catsacor 6th Mar 18, 7:07 AM
    • 38 Posts
    • 38 Thanks
    Catsacor
    The things that would be a turn-off for me are:


    * Small windows - traditional olde worlde cottages have no appeal for me because of this !
    I like large windows that give bright, airy, rooms.


    * Period properties - their 'traditional features' just leave me cold.
    I like spacious, contemporary properties.


    * A single bathroom, in the property, that is located downstairs.


    * A north facing/shaded back garden.


    * Located near a school.


    * No driveway/designated parking for a car.


    The more i type, the more i think of .......
    It's the most expensive purchase you'll ever make so it has to be as near perfect as it can get.
    • ancientofdays
    • By ancientofdays 6th Mar 18, 7:22 AM
    • 1,598 Posts
    • 18,953 Thanks
    ancientofdays
    What's wrong with bungalows????
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    I know you have one and I'm sure it is lovely but I just don't like them. I think some of my dislike may stem from being brought up in an area close to the coast, where the serried ranks of identical bungalows looked so dismal.


    ETA I have lived in a bungalow, my parents bought a new build bungalow when I was a child. It had the nicest garden, gorgeous as my dad was a very keen gardener but I never liked the actual building.
    Last edited by ancientofdays; 06-03-2018 at 7:25 AM.
    I was jumping to conclusions and one of them jumped back
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 6th Mar 18, 7:29 AM
    • 1,895 Posts
    • 2,752 Thanks
    shortcrust
    A garden that is in the shade all the time would be a no go for me.
    Originally posted by vicki2221
    Me too. A place to sit in the sun and grow and few things was top of my list when house hunting. I almost didn't view the house I'm in now because on google earth it still showed old tree in the neighbour's garden that used to block all the sun for most of the day.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 6th Mar 18, 7:55 AM
    • 25,043 Posts
    • 92,568 Thanks
    Davesnave

    But the biggest turnoff for me would be a bungalow
    Originally posted by ancientofdays
    We bought our bungalow because a massive turn-off feature, a flat roofed extension at the front was just one of the weirdness factors which made it highly affordable.

    Realising that our council's planning dept must be a soft touch, we then obtained PP to add another floor, but looking at the plans critically, it was a large outlay for a small area of usable floor space, so we extended elsewhere. Now, I never give the bungalow situation a second thought; it's our normal.

    I can understand people who don't want a long term home ruling places out over relatively trivial things. Not everyone wants the fuss and bother of remedial work, or knows how to go about it. However, if it's a long term home, being more flexible can pay dividends, especially with ugly ducklings in a good situation.

    We have no flat roofs now.

    EDIT: This great example of what we haven't ended-up with just happened to pop into my in-box......It might be roughly what you mean too, being coastal.

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-53240802.html

    Yuk!
    Last edited by Davesnave; 06-03-2018 at 8:05 AM.
    'It's a terrible thing to wait until you're readyÖ..Generally speaking, now is as good a time as any.' Hugh Lawrie.
    • lookstraightahead
    • By lookstraightahead 6th Mar 18, 7:59 AM
    • 159 Posts
    • 166 Thanks
    lookstraightahead
    Anywhere with the risk of a huge new housing estate being built nearby. Anywhere near a main road. Anywhere where the neighbours (properties) look unkempt.
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 6th Mar 18, 8:26 AM
    • 30,585 Posts
    • 57,786 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    I know you have one and I'm sure it is lovely but I just don't like them. I think some of my dislike may stem from being brought up in an area close to the coast, where the serried ranks of identical bungalows looked so dismal.


    ETA I have lived in a bungalow, my parents bought a new build bungalow when I was a child. It had the nicest garden, gorgeous as my dad was a very keen gardener but I never liked the actual building.
    Originally posted by ancientofdays
    I agree with you about most bungalows. Ours, however is very pretty and doesn't look like a home for old people. There are only our pair of semis like it in the street, the half-dozen or so other bungalows are not as nice and the rest of the properties are houses.
    • ancientofdays
    • By ancientofdays 6th Mar 18, 8:45 AM
    • 1,598 Posts
    • 18,953 Thanks
    ancientofdays
    We bought our bungalow because a massive turn-off feature, a flat roofed extension at the front was just one of the weirdness factors which made it highly affordable.

    Realising that our council's planning dept must be a soft touch, we then obtained PP to add another floor, but looking at the plans critically, it was a large outlay for a small area of usable floor space, so we extended elsewhere. Now, I never give the bungalow situation a second thought; it's our normal.

    I can understand people who don't want a long term home ruling places out over relatively trivial things. Not everyone wants the fuss and bother of remedial work, or knows how to go about it. However, if it's a long term home, being more flexible can pay dividends, especially with ugly ducklings in a good situation.

    We have no flat roofs now.

    EDIT: This great example of what we haven't ended-up with just happened to pop into my in-box......It might be roughly what you mean too, being coastal.

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-53240802.html

    Yuk!
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Yes, that would not be to my taste but our house search seems to have ground to a halt. My criteria are few compared to my OH's restrictions. He doesn't like the idea of being on a main road, whereas I need public transport. He has got a thing against corner plots, for no sensible reason that can be discerned. He has another thing about stairs going up from a sitting room. The list goes on. Most things I show him are Too Small but he wants to buy in an expensive area.

    I bet we end up buying an open plan bungalow and I'll just have to mime going upstairs at bedtime. I suppose that really, what I would like best is a large vegetable patch with a bit of edwardian ir victotian house attached. If we could afford it, I'd really like an annexe, the tidiness of which would be nothing to do with me. And a potting shed, I do like my own batcave
    I was jumping to conclusions and one of them jumped back
    • seven-day-weekend
    • By seven-day-weekend 6th Mar 18, 9:01 AM
    • 30,585 Posts
    • 57,786 Thanks
    seven-day-weekend
    I agree with you about most bungalows. Ours, however is very pretty and doesn't look like a home for old people. There are only our pair of semis like it in the street, the half-dozen or so other bungalows are not as nice and the rest of the properties are houses.
    Originally posted by seven-day-weekend
    Ours is a bit like this, but two-bed (i.e without the loft conversion) and a semi:

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-63691834.html
    Last edited by seven-day-weekend; 06-03-2018 at 9:05 AM.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 6th Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    • 5,195 Posts
    • 23,996 Thanks
    Slinky
    EDIT: This great example of what we haven't ended-up with just happened to pop into my in-box......It might be roughly what you mean too, being coastal.

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-53240802.html

    Yuk!
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    Now that has one of my no-no's a sloping plot. We looked at a bungalow that came on a massive plot, the vendor admitted it was a trial to mow the front garden which had banking down to a public path, which looked like you'd have to haul a mower up and down on a rope.

    We'll be extending our house when we move to it, we're considering getting away with the remaining lawn in the back garden as there won't be much of it left, and with no direct access from front to back, the garden waste has to be got out through the garage. There's a stupid yard wide strip of grass out the front that will go as well.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 6th Mar 18, 9:33 AM
    • 15,602 Posts
    • 43,334 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention

    EDIT: This great example of what we haven't ended-up with just happened to pop into my in-box......It might be roughly what you mean too, being coastal.

    http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-53240802.html

    Yuk!
    Originally posted by Davesnave
    First impressions - not good.

    The rest of it isn't bad though. So the yellow paint on wall could soon enough be replaced with a soft white/cream. I guess there are attractive garage doors around? - so one could replace that with something nicer-looking (important - with it being so prominent).

    The rest of the front garden is a challenge two ways over - the slope and being so ungarden-like and I do know "ungarden-like" is a challenge to turn into "proper garden" - as I've got that problem myself and am gradually turning it "normal".
    Like Frankie said - I did it my way.
    It's MY life......
    • wantonnoodle
    • By wantonnoodle 6th Mar 18, 11:03 AM
    • 248 Posts
    • 171 Thanks
    wantonnoodle
    Personal no-nos when we were house hunting 18 months - 2 years ago now:

    - Small north facing garden (too small to get any sun)
    - Small kitchen / galley kitchen (a lot of houses in our area have long very narrow kitchens)
    - Trees overshadowing the (south facing) garden
    - Small windows (I love natural light)
    - No offstreet parking (or opportunity to park offstreet - where we bought does have offstreet access, but the location of a shed makes it very tight indeed - not ideal but long term options)
    - Small rooms in general

    We bought a corner plot with south west facing rear garden. The side faces north west so doesn't get a great deal of sun (except the strip next to the fence by the road). Front faces north-east and we have a weeping birch in our front garden in the corner by our boundary with the road and next door, so doesn't get a great deal of sun. I like to grow things and sit out in the sun. Our living space is in the back (dining room at front) and we have double french doors out onto a decked area. Main back and side garden is gravel, though longer term we may get rid of it and turf or fill it with plants. Kitchen had originally been long and narrow, but had been extended to make a good sized square kitchen which ticked that box.
    • Silvertabby
    • By Silvertabby 6th Mar 18, 11:22 AM
    • 2,733 Posts
    • 3,908 Thanks
    Silvertabby
    When we were house hunting a few years ago we made lists of:

    1. What we had to have.

    Reasonable sized but managable garden
    Decent sized kitchen with separate utility room (cat litter tray for the use of!)
    Downstairs cloakroom

    2. What we would like.

    En-suite
    4 beds rather than 3

    3. Absolute no-no

    Downstairs cloakroom right next to the front door
    Shared access of any description.

    I expect that most people will have other priorities.
    • shortcrust
    • By shortcrust 6th Mar 18, 11:23 AM
    • 1,895 Posts
    • 2,752 Thanks
    shortcrust
    It's a bit heartbreaking to see how many people wouldn't touch my lovely house with a bargepole!
    • LadyL2013
    • By LadyL2013 6th Mar 18, 11:39 AM
    • 157 Posts
    • 120 Thanks
    LadyL2013
    Front door that opens straight into the living room. - Feels less safe somehow and don't like having to walk through lounge to get to everywhere.


    Open plan kitchen and living room. Don't like cooking smells in the lounge.


    Downstairs bathroom only. Pain having to go downstairs in the middle of the night and traipse downstairs and back up to have a shower.


    On street parking if the street is always busy for obvious reasons.


    On a main road. Death trap for the cat.


    No garden.


    My garden is actually North facing but is a right little suntrap in the summer, which is unusual for North facing gardens. It's also on 3 levels, which isn't ideal but didn't have the budget to be too fussy. But actually I've grown to quite like it. The bottom level is the shed level, the middle level is the nice lawned pretty bit and the top level is the BBQ/social/sunbathing area.
    Last edited by LadyL2013; 06-03-2018 at 11:48 AM.
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