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    • travelhoppers
    • By travelhoppers 4th Mar 18, 7:05 PM
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    travelhoppers
    First Time Buyer House - Refurbishment Help!
    • #1
    • 4th Mar 18, 7:05 PM
    First Time Buyer House - Refurbishment Help! 4th Mar 18 at 7:05 PM
    Hello All,
    Me and my husband have recently bought a new house and we would just like some advice.

    The house was built in 2000, so the walls are plastered and painted but there a few cracks and dents on a few wall so we are thinking of thin re-skim in some room? How much would this roughly cost per room?

    We want to get rid of the skirting board to and put new ones in. The coving is fine. Would you re-skim first and then put the skirting board or put those in first then skim the wall? How much would this cost?

    The house has lovely oak doors which for some reason the old tenants have painted one side white and left the other side. Is there a way of getting rid of this paint?

    What do you call a person, who can plaster, fit skirting boards, and decorate? Or do I need a separate person for each job?

    Thank you!
    Last edited by travelhoppers; 04-03-2018 at 7:09 PM.
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 4th Mar 18, 7:28 PM
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    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 4th Mar 18, 7:28 PM
    • #2
    • 4th Mar 18, 7:28 PM
    I doubt you need to reskim the walls. I would employ a decorator to come and fill the cracks and dinks.

    Employ a carpenter to change your skirting, then employ the decorator. Plastering makes an almighty mess and Indoubt is necessary in such a new house.

    The doors might be veneered rather than solid oak which would make it problematic to remove the paint without also affecting the veneer if there is beading or detail to the door.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • travelhoppers
    • By travelhoppers 4th Mar 18, 8:13 PM
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    travelhoppers
    • #3
    • 4th Mar 18, 8:13 PM
    • #3
    • 4th Mar 18, 8:13 PM
    I find the walls uneven in some places hence why I thought a good skim would neaten it up.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Mar 18, 7:47 AM
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    Doozergirl
    • #4
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:47 AM
    • #4
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:47 AM
    Okay, well, you need to strip the skirting off.

    In all honesty, some people do skim up to coving and architraves, but I never would. It sounds like you want the walls perfect. To me, that means stripping off all everything around it, skimming and replacing. Not a fan of coving in a newish build house unless it's a really well designed feature, so I'd lose that altogether.

    I still think that a good decorator will do the best job with the least mess. Decorating is just as much, if not more, about preparing walls. Sanding back, filling, removing imperfections. Still needs doing to a freshly skimmed wall!
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 5th Mar 18, 8:24 AM
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    Furts
    • #5
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:24 AM
    • #5
    • 5th Mar 18, 8:24 AM
    I am puzzled by the logic in the proposals. A year 2000 home will have a good finish to the walls, which means a bit of filling here and there, and for perfection a couple of coats of contractors emulsion with a rub down between coats. Talk of scimming is crazy. But if scimming is demanded, then much as the good Doozergirl says. The skirting and coving need removing. However the work, damage, and expense are considerable, A knock on is the coving is "glued"to the ceiling so this will be damaged.

    But even skirting removal is crazy. This stands a good chance of being glued to the walls, and is caulked at the top. Damage will be done removing it, then there is the insulation and (possible) membrane damage to be considered. Basically the skirting is there for the life of the house and in accordance with sustainability, being eco and the three R's one leaves it well alone.

    Of course skirting can be replaced but the question is why do this? Far better to concentrate on something with a visual impact be this bold decorating, wall paper, new doors, carpets or whatever.
    • martinsurrey
    • By martinsurrey 5th Mar 18, 11:23 AM
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    martinsurrey
    • #6
    • 5th Mar 18, 11:23 AM
    • #6
    • 5th Mar 18, 11:23 AM
    I am puzzled by the logic in the proposals. A year 2000 home will have a good finish to the walls, which means a bit of filling here and there, and for perfection a couple of coats of contractors emulsion with a rub down between coats. Talk of scimming is crazy. But if scimming is demanded, then much as the good Doozergirl says. The skirting and coving need removing. However the work, damage, and expense are considerable, A knock on is the coving is "glued"to the ceiling so this will be damaged.

    But even skirting removal is crazy. This stands a good chance of being glued to the walls, and is caulked at the top. Damage will be done removing it, then there is the insulation and (possible) membrane damage to be considered. Basically the skirting is there for the life of the house and in accordance with sustainability, being eco and the three R's one leaves it well alone.

    Of course skirting can be replaced but the question is why do this? Far better to concentrate on something with a visual impact be this bold decorating, wall paper, new doors, carpets or whatever.
    Originally posted by Furts
    Yup, getting skirting off a dot and dabbed boarded wall will cause havoc to the boarding, it'll be most likely glued on, and pulling it off will pull the board off the wall, meaning a lot of repair (I know as I've done it when removing walls in a room, and replacing the rest of the now larger room).

    unless its beyond salvage, get a good decorator in, not much cant be fixed, and it'll cost less than replacing.
    • DaftyDuck
    • By DaftyDuck 5th Mar 18, 1:15 PM
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    DaftyDuck
    • #7
    • 5th Mar 18, 1:15 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Mar 18, 1:15 PM
    Agree with all the others. I suspect a good decorator should be able to get the finish you desire... If that finish is possible.

    There would be an immense increase in costs if you reskim, as you might need new skirting and architrave, and the end finish might disappoint you anyway.
    • travelhoppers
    • By travelhoppers 5th Mar 18, 1:15 PM
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    travelhoppers
    • #8
    • 5th Mar 18, 1:15 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Mar 18, 1:15 PM
    Hello All

    Yes I think maybe sanding down the imperfections is what we actually need to do.
    There is a built in TV cabinet/stand which might take away some plaster when we remove it hence why we thought we could just skim everything.

    Skirting boards - there is a piece that has fallen off and they havenít been placed on properly. There is actually a gap between the skirting board and the wall. Also they were wooden, and they are been painted but we can still see the wood in some places and paint strokes so we rather just replace them.
    • Furts
    • By Furts 5th Mar 18, 1:54 PM
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    Furts
    • #9
    • 5th Mar 18, 1:54 PM
    • #9
    • 5th Mar 18, 1:54 PM
    Hello All

    Yes I think maybe sanding down the imperfections is what we actually need to do.
    There is a built in TV cabinet/stand which might take away some plaster when we remove it hence why we thought we could just skim everything.

    Skirting boards - there is a piece that has fallen off and they havenít been placed on properly. There is actually a gap between the skirting board and the wall. Also they were wooden, and they are been painted but we can still see the wood in some places and paint strokes so we rather just replace them.
    Originally posted by travelhoppers
    What you are saying is somebody has decorated the skirting in a half hearted manner. They have been scimpy with acrylic caulk along the top, and perhaps a little fast and furious with their painting. But to you that justifies ripping off all the skirting?

    A tube of acrylic caulk is around £1.20 at Toolstation. Running this round all your skirting could be done in an hour or so. You then paint over the skirting and hey presto a lovely job utilising the existing skirting.

    I accept it is your choice what you do, but your logic and reasoning are crazy.
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 5th Mar 18, 2:29 PM
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    Doozergirl
    I'm repeating myself but with the extra info you've added, all of this is really is stuff for a decorator!

    Decorating is not about slapping paint around, it is all about sanding back, filling and preparing the walls. If you get a proper decorator, they will sort it all out for you.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • travelhoppers
    • By travelhoppers 5th Mar 18, 2:33 PM
    • 10 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    travelhoppers
    What you are saying is somebody has decorated the skirting in a half hearted manner. They have been scimpy with acrylic caulk along the top, and perhaps a little fast and furious with their painting. But to you that justifies ripping off all the skirting?

    A tube of acrylic caulk is around £1.20 at Toolstation. Running this round all your skirting could be done in an hour or so. You then paint over the skirting and hey presto a lovely job utilising the existing skirting.

    I accept it is your choice what you do, but your logic and reasoning are crazy.
    Originally posted by Furts

    Well they are done in a bad way and there is one piece that is fallen off. We thought new pre-finished skirting boards might give a nicer finish without having paint over existing ones.
    There is a gap between the laminate and skirting too, so I thought new thicker skirting will look better than beading.

    But thank you for your advice! We will look in to that. We donít want to spend unnecessary money but do want a nicely finished house. This is the first time we have ever decorated so we are still learning.
    Last edited by travelhoppers; 05-03-2018 at 2:46 PM.
    • travelhoppers
    • By travelhoppers 5th Mar 18, 2:35 PM
    • 10 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    travelhoppers
    I'm repeating myself but with the extra info you've added, all of this is really is stuff for a decorator!

    Decorating is not about slapping paint around, it is all about sanding back, filling and preparing the walls. If you get a proper decorator, they will sort it all out for you.
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    Yes we are going to get a proper decorator. I am grateful for your advice as we would have got the walls skimmed as thatís what we assumed we had to do!
    • Furts
    • By Furts 5th Mar 18, 2:51 PM
    • 4,286 Posts
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    Furts
    Well they are done in a bad way and there is one piece that is fallen off. We thought new pre-finished skirting boards might give a nicer finish without having paint over existing ones.
    There is a gap between the laminate and skirting too, so I thought new thicker skirting will look better than beading.

    But thank you for your advice! We will look in to that. We donít want to spend unnecessary money but do want a nicely finished house. This is the first time we have ever decorated so we are still learning.
    Originally posted by travelhoppers
    Off the shelf, or standard skirting, is all the same thickness. Only the height and the pattern change. If you want it thicker either you have to get this machined to your requirements or you set standard skirting away from the walls by fixing "grounds". Again a lot of work and expense.

    Pre finished skirting might be white primed mdf. If so, this is meant to be decorated, all the more so if it is being fixed by nails or screws. This is because the screws or nails will have filler over them and this is hidden by the decorating.
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