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  • FIRST POST
    • riotlady
    • By riotlady 3rd Mar 18, 3:38 PM
    • 93Posts
    • 230Thanks
    riotlady
    Bidder asked me to cancel their bid but bid again?
    • #1
    • 3rd Mar 18, 3:38 PM
    Bidder asked me to cancel their bid but bid again? 3rd Mar 18 at 3:38 PM
    I'm selling an item on ebay which has a few bids on it- yesterday the high bidder messaged me and asked me to cancel their bid and I did, but today I can see that they've bid again and are now the high bidder again at a higher amount than they were previously! Should I be suspicious? Tempted to message them and inquire but maybe I should just leave it?
    Make 2018 in 2018 challenge-
    509/2018
Page 1
    • Ms Chocaholic
    • By Ms Chocaholic 3rd Mar 18, 3:40 PM
    • 9,320 Posts
    • 57,445 Thanks
    Ms Chocaholic
    • #2
    • 3rd Mar 18, 3:40 PM
    • #2
    • 3rd Mar 18, 3:40 PM
    I had this happen to me a few months ago but with a BIN. a buyer purchased and then messaged me to ask to cancel as he had purchased the wrong item. Happy to do that but a few days later he bought it again BIN and proceeded with purchase and there were no problems.
    Thrifty Till 50 Then Spend Till The End

    You can please some of the people some of the time, all of the people some of the time, some of the people all of the time but you can never please all of the people all of the time
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 3rd Mar 18, 4:30 PM
    • 1,610 Posts
    • 1,398 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    • #3
    • 3rd Mar 18, 4:30 PM
    • #3
    • 3rd Mar 18, 4:30 PM
    If someboy asked me to cancel their bid I would also block them from bidding again. Ok there might have been a genuine reason, but its not worth the hassle dealing with people like that.

    Nothing wrong with messaging them to ask.
    • theonlywayisup
    • By theonlywayisup 3rd Mar 18, 5:04 PM
    • 12,151 Posts
    • 8,225 Thanks
    theonlywayisup
    • #4
    • 3rd Mar 18, 5:04 PM
    • #4
    • 3rd Mar 18, 5:04 PM
    Agree with above, a bidder asking to cancel is a blocked bidder.

    If you have time, block them and remove their bid.
    • soolin
    • By soolin 3rd Mar 18, 5:10 PM
    • 60,303 Posts
    • 42,961 Thanks
    soolin
    • #5
    • 3rd Mar 18, 5:10 PM
    • #5
    • 3rd Mar 18, 5:10 PM
    Agree with above, a bidder asking to cancel is a blocked bidder.

    If you have time, block them and remove their bid.
    Originally posted by theonlywayisup
    Same her as well, sad but true, protecting my account must take precedence over anything else.
    I'm the Board Guide for the Ebay Board , Charities Board , Dosh & Disability , Up Your Income and the Local MoneySaving-England board which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. However, do remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
    New to Forum? Guide
    • riotlady
    • By riotlady 4th Mar 18, 8:40 PM
    • 93 Posts
    • 230 Thanks
    riotlady
    • #6
    • 4th Mar 18, 8:40 PM
    • #6
    • 4th Mar 18, 8:40 PM
    Thanks for the advice everyone, have removed their bid and blocked them from bidding again. Bidding has gone up past what they had bid now so I haven!!!8217;t lost out
    Make 2018 in 2018 challenge-
    509/2018
    • vacheron
    • By vacheron 5th Mar 18, 2:05 PM
    • 823 Posts
    • 760 Thanks
    vacheron
    • #7
    • 5th Mar 18, 2:05 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Mar 18, 2:05 PM
    It's sad to see so much suspicion when there is also a perfectly reasonable explanation: (all numbers below are made up, but you get the gist)


    Buyer places a bid with a max of say 100.

    Bidding is currently at 50 so he eBay automatically proxy bids him to 51.

    Bidder suddenly realises that 100 may be a bit rich for him and he can only really justify spending 70 maximum.

    Buyer therefore asks for the seller to cancel his bid and re-bids with an 70 maximum. Meanwhile someone else has upped the bidding to 55 so eBay will automatically proxy bid him up to be the high bidder at 56 (higher than before).

    This would also apply if the buyer released he had bidded a max of 7000 when he meant to type 70.00 etc.
    Last edited by vacheron; 05-03-2018 at 2:07 PM.
    The rich buy assets.
    The poor only have expenses.
    The middle class buy liabilities they think are assets.
    Robert T. Kiyosaki
    • parking_question_chap
    • By parking_question_chap 5th Mar 18, 7:10 PM
    • 1,610 Posts
    • 1,398 Thanks
    parking_question_chap
    • #8
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:10 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:10 PM
    It's sad to see so much suspicion when there is also a perfectly reasonable explanation: (all numbers below are made up, but you get the gist)


    Buyer places a bid with a max of say 100.

    Bidding is currently at 50 so he eBay automatically proxy bids him to 51.

    Bidder suddenly realises that 100 may be a bit rich for him and he can only really justify spending 70 maximum.

    Buyer therefore asks for the seller to cancel his bid and re-bids with an 70 maximum. Meanwhile someone else has upped the bidding to 55 so eBay will automatically proxy bid him up to be the high bidder at 56 (higher than before).

    This would also apply if the buyer released he had bidded a max of 7000 when he meant to type 70.00 etc.
    Originally posted by vacheron
    Why is it "sad"?

    Its just protecing your sale from a potential non payer.

    Same person who decided that 100 was too much might then decide 70 is too much, but wait the auction is ended, so what do they do? They dont pay and ignore all messages. Been there done that, and its not worth dealing with people that give any indication that they are not certain on their commitment to buy.
    • riotlady
    • By riotlady 5th Mar 18, 7:11 PM
    • 93 Posts
    • 230 Thanks
    riotlady
    • #9
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:11 PM
    • #9
    • 5th Mar 18, 7:11 PM
    It's sad to see so much suspicion when there is also a perfectly reasonable explanation: (all numbers below are made up, but you get the gist)


    Buyer places a bid with a max of say 100.

    Bidding is currently at 50 so he eBay automatically proxy bids him to 51.

    Bidder suddenly realises that 100 may be a bit rich for him and he can only really justify spending 70 maximum.

    Buyer therefore asks for the seller to cancel his bid and re-bids with an 70 maximum. Meanwhile someone else has upped the bidding to 55 so eBay will automatically proxy bid him up to be the high bidder at 56 (higher than before).

    This would also apply if the buyer released he had bidded a max of 7000 when he meant to type 70.00 etc.
    Originally posted by vacheron
    Tbh the kind of person that does that sounds like the kind of person who'd be more likely to change their mind after winning too.
    Anyway, the bidder in question is now messaging me asking why their moneys not good enough so I feel like I'm better off shot of them!
    Make 2018 in 2018 challenge-
    509/2018
    • soolin
    • By soolin 6th Mar 18, 8:08 AM
    • 60,303 Posts
    • 42,961 Thanks
    soolin
    It's sad to see so much suspicion when there is also a perfectly reasonable explanation: (all numbers below are made up, but you get the gist)


    Buyer places a bid with a max of say 100.

    Bidding is currently at 50 so he eBay automatically proxy bids him to 51.

    Bidder suddenly realises that 100 may be a bit rich for him and he can only really justify spending 70 maximum.

    Buyer therefore asks for the seller to cancel his bid and re-bids with an 70 maximum. Meanwhile someone else has upped the bidding to 55 so eBay will automatically proxy bid him up to be the high bidder at 56 (higher than before).

    This would also apply if the buyer released he had bidded a max of 7000 when he meant to type 70.00 etc.
    Originally posted by vacheron
    Since buyers can remove or cancel their own bids the above scenario seems unlikely. It either means they don't want to remove their bid, perhaps they have a habit of doing this and are on an eBay warning, or else they can't be bothered to do so. Either way as a seller I would feel the need to,protect myself against such a buyer.
    I'm the Board Guide for the Ebay Board , Charities Board , Dosh & Disability , Up Your Income and the Local MoneySaving-England board which means I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. However, do remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with this). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
    New to Forum? Guide
    • November2
    • By November2 6th Mar 18, 9:10 AM
    • 759 Posts
    • 211 Thanks
    November2
    Wish someone would explain to me how the 'code' thing works, can never work out what the real name is!
    • vacheron
    • By vacheron 6th Mar 18, 9:13 AM
    • 823 Posts
    • 760 Thanks
    vacheron
    I suppose I'm playing devils advocate by assuming it's an honest bidder.

    If they had zero feedback then alarm bells would ring for me. If they had a decent prior feedback record then I would be far less concerned and would have given them the benefit of the doubt.

    I've been a private seller on eBay since 2001 with probably 600-700 sales in total. In this time I can think of 1 or maybe 2 instances when someone with decent feedback profile has failed to pay. but have lost count of the number of times zero feedback bidders have messed me about (2 alone this month!)

    The worst case scenario would be that they win and don't pay. I'd file a NPB in 48 hours, stick a mark on their record, block them then put the item back up for sale in a few days time, or send a second chance offer to the next highest bidder.

    I was the buyer and had made a genuine mistake (maybe didn't release I could cancel my own bid) and kept the seller informed it would leave me feeling a bit miffed too if I'd found out I had been subsequently banned and I might also consider asking them why, but it appears that would be interpreted negatively too.

    I guess we'll never know.
    The rich buy assets.
    The poor only have expenses.
    The middle class buy liabilities they think are assets.
    Robert T. Kiyosaki
    • riotlady
    • By riotlady 6th Mar 18, 10:26 AM
    • 93 Posts
    • 230 Thanks
    riotlady
    I suppose I'm playing devils advocate by assuming it's an honest bidder.

    If they had zero feedback then alarm bells would ring for me. If they had a decent prior feedback record then I would be far less concerned and would have given them the benefit of the doubt.

    I've been a private seller on eBay since 2001 with probably 600-700 sales in total. In this time I can think of 1 or maybe 2 instances when someone with decent feedback profile has failed to pay. but have lost count of the number of times zero feedback bidders have messed me about (2 alone this month!)

    The worst case scenario would be that they win and don't pay. I'd file a NPB in 48 hours, stick a mark on their record, block them then put the item back up for sale in a few days time, or send a second chance offer to the next highest bidder.

    I was the buyer and had made a genuine mistake (maybe didn't release I could cancel my own bid) and kept the seller informed it would leave me feeling a bit miffed too if I'd found out I had been subsequently banned and I might also consider asking them why, but it appears that would be interpreted negatively too.

    I guess we'll never know.
    Originally posted by vacheron
    I'm only interpreting it negatively because of the phrasing- there's a big difference between "I'd like to bid on your item, can I ask why I'm blocked" and "what, my moneys not good enough for you?"
    Make 2018 in 2018 challenge-
    509/2018
    • vacheron
    • By vacheron 6th Mar 18, 10:41 AM
    • 823 Posts
    • 760 Thanks
    vacheron
    I'm only interpreting it negatively because of the phrasing- there's a big difference between "I'd like to bid on your item, can I ask why I'm blocked" and "what, my moneys not good enough for you?"
    Originally posted by riotlady
    Ah, I thought you might have been paraphrasing. That does cast them in a somewhat different light!

    What was his previous feedback like out of curiosity?
    The rich buy assets.
    The poor only have expenses.
    The middle class buy liabilities they think are assets.
    Robert T. Kiyosaki
    • riotlady
    • By riotlady 6th Mar 18, 12:42 PM
    • 93 Posts
    • 230 Thanks
    riotlady
    Ah, I thought you might have been paraphrasing. That does cast them in a somewhat different light!

    What was his previous feedback like out of curiosity?
    Originally posted by vacheron
    Not a lot of history but what was there was all good.
    Make 2018 in 2018 challenge-
    509/2018
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