Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • atrixblue.-MFR-.
    • By atrixblue.-MFR-. 3rd Mar 18, 12:58 PM
    • 6,555Posts
    • 4,544Thanks
    atrixblue.-MFR-.
    • #1
    • 3rd Mar 18, 12:58 PM
    3rd Mar 18 at 12:58 PM
    found my answer
    Last edited by atrixblue.-MFR-.; 03-03-2018 at 1:13 PM.
    "We only have one world, But we live in different worlds"- Mark Knopfler Brothers in arms, Miss you gramps.
Page 2
    • anamenottaken
    • By anamenottaken 4th Mar 18, 3:39 PM
    • 4,146 Posts
    • 3,632 Thanks
    anamenottaken
    injury was done on the way when she was requested to come in.




    https://www.nelsonslaw.co.uk/uk-weather-law-say-employee-rights-ice-snow/


    considering the employer over staffed her service house, cancelled wifes days off, and failed to ask the driver that drives the 4x4 to collect her, I would say was undue pressure. There plenty of sites out there where it states an employee could sue in this event.
    Originally posted by atrixblue.-MFR-.
    I followed the link you provided. Regarding injury it says,
    Is my employer liable if I slip on snow or ice at work?
    Employers are required to maintain safe working conditions for employees so they may be liable if there is an accident at work which could have been avoided.
    So that is about an accident at work, not on the public highway when travelling to normal place of work.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 4th Mar 18, 3:44 PM
    • 2,592 Posts
    • 4,300 Thanks
    Tabbytabitha
    injury was done on the way when she was requested to come in.




    https://www.nelsonslaw.co.uk/uk-weather-law-say-employee-rights-ice-snow/


    considering the employer over staffed her service house, cancelled wifes days off, and failed to ask the driver that drives the 4x4 to collect her, I would say was undue pressure. There plenty of sites out there where it states an employee could sue in this event.
    Originally posted by atrixblue.-MFR-.
    Your link says,

    "Is my employer liable if I slip on snow or ice at work?
    Employers are required to maintain safe working conditions for employees so they may be liable if there is an accident at work which could have been avoided."
    Nothing about injuring yourself on the way to work.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 4th Mar 18, 4:04 PM
    • 38,613 Posts
    • 35,337 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    considering the employer over staffed her service house, cancelled wifes days off, and failed to ask the driver that drives the 4x4 to collect her, I would say was undue pressure.
    Originally posted by atrixblue.-MFR-.
    Yes, but ...

    I can understand an employer attempting to overstaff in a situation where staff are needed 24/7, rather than be left short, given that, for example, your wife or another colleague might have got 100 yards down the road and turned back after realising it was actually not possible to walk in.

    Also while work may not have asked the 4x4 driver to collect her, your wife equally did not ask for that, nor ask for transport to be sorted for the end of her shift.

    Pressure CAN be resisted.

    I'm not clear when she sustained the injury, and that might also be relevant.

    There plenty of sites out there where it states an employee could sue in this event.
    Originally posted by atrixblue.-MFR-.
    Possibly, but how long has she been in this job, and how badly does she want to keep it if the answer is under two years? Also, and sorry to bang on about this, but is she in a union, and what do they say?
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • agrinnall
    • By agrinnall 4th Mar 18, 7:07 PM
    • 20,321 Posts
    • 16,080 Thanks
    agrinnall
    iThere plenty of sites out there where it states an employee could sue in this event.
    Originally posted by atrixblue.-MFR-.
    And are these sites for lawyers who would make money out of taking such action?
    • p00hsticks
    • By p00hsticks 5th Mar 18, 12:55 AM
    • 6,250 Posts
    • 6,707 Thanks
    p00hsticks
    There plenty of sites out there where it states an employee could sue in this event.
    Originally posted by atrixblue.-MFR-.
    Well, any one can sue pretty much any one for any reason.

    What you need to look at is whether they are likely to win.
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 5th Mar 18, 1:59 AM
    • 5,611 Posts
    • 4,943 Thanks
    mgdavid
    To be honest, I was more on about driving and the road system girding to a halt.

    There is a whole generation of drivers out there who have very rarely, if ever, experienced conditions such as these and won't have a clue how to handle them and even some of the "older" drivers can't cope because it's such a rare occurrence......
    Originally posted by RichardD1970
    may one ask where on earth you live?
    Here in the sheltered Thames Valley I walk and drive on a few inches of snow about every 5 years on average over the last 5 decades.

    Maybe you mean there's a whole generation out there who don't have an ounce of common sense.
    The questions that get the best answers are the questions that give most detail....
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 5th Mar 18, 12:11 PM
    • 38,613 Posts
    • 35,337 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    may one ask where on earth you live?
    Here in the sheltered Thames Valley I walk and drive on a few inches of snow about every 5 years on average over the last 5 decades.

    Maybe you mean there's a whole generation out there who don't have an ounce of common sense.
    Originally posted by mgdavid
    I have quite a few colleagues with plenty of common sense, but they don't have enough experience of driving on snow to give them any confidence to do so. It just doesn't happen that often, and usually when it does there is still public transport.

    Maybe I should suggest a skid pan as our next team building exercise?

    But more seriously, what we've had this year in this area is unusual: we've lived her for nearly 20 years and I've never known it bring the buses and the trains completely to a halt for so long. We have some open areas within the city, and on the (main) roads across them we had drifts over a foot deep. I've tried walking through it, and it's been darned hard work. Even though I could see that the roads outside my house were passable after the first day, I left them to those who needed to use them.

    I did get some experience of driving on snow, in a Ford Anglia which tells you how long ago it was, but I don't recall it being as bad as it's been here this year. And we've not had the worst of it.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • RichardD1970
    • By RichardD1970 5th Mar 18, 12:37 PM
    • 2,940 Posts
    • 4,343 Thanks
    RichardD1970
    may one ask where on earth you live?
    Here in the sheltered Thames Valley I walk and drive on a few inches of snow about every 5 years on average over the last 5 decades.

    Maybe you mean there's a whole generation out there who don't have an ounce of common sense.
    Originally posted by mgdavid
    West Midlands.

    Apart from this winter I can't really think of anything in the last 10-15 years where, locally, we have had snowfall significant enough to cause disruption.

    Even going by your experience, if someone has been driving for 15 years that only gives then 3 instances of having to cope with these sort of conditions and as a lot of people just won't try then they have even less experience.

    A bit different from the countries originally mentioned where they have prolonged snowy periods every year.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 5th Mar 18, 3:32 PM
    • 10,725 Posts
    • 8,982 Thanks
    lincroft1710

    I did get some experience of driving on snow, in a Ford Anglia which tells you how long ago it was,
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    Is your surname Weasley?
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 5th Mar 18, 4:06 PM
    • 3,168 Posts
    • 6,289 Thanks
    Smodlet
    Maybe you mean there's a whole generation out there who don't have an ounce of common sense.
    Originally posted by mgdavid

    Have you read the House Buying, Renting and Selling Thread? I think there are at least two such generations otherwise how did some of the present 20-somethings come to be so lacking in initiative? Surely their parents must be equally so?

    I know this does not apply to everyone of either generation; there are also plenty of posts from FTBs with as much or more nous as those of any previous generation but it seems increasingly to be the case that the blame someone else/sue culture is becoming the norm.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 5th Mar 18, 6:30 PM
    • 38,613 Posts
    • 35,337 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    Is your surname Weasley?
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    No, if it was then it wouldn't be a problem, I'd just fly over the snow, wouldn't I?

    I had forgotten that a whole new generation had now been introduced to the Ford Anglia. It is a very long time since I saw one on the road.

    Actually, the thing I learned in my Anglia, is that if you're following someone in a Mini, you can't take the corners at the same speed as the mini. That's a good lesson to learn in your early days of driving.
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 5th Mar 18, 7:19 PM
    • 10,725 Posts
    • 8,982 Thanks
    lincroft1710
    No, if it was then it wouldn't be a problem, I'd just fly over the snow, wouldn't I?

    I had forgotten that a whole new generation had now been introduced to the Ford Anglia. It is a very long time since I saw one on the road.

    Actually, the thing I learned in my Anglia, is that if you're following someone in a Mini, you can't take the corners at the same speed as the mini. That's a good lesson to learn in your early days of driving.
    Originally posted by Savvy_Sue
    First car I learned to drive in was an Anglia, which after a few lessons and getting used to the car, my instructor decided to swap for a Mk 1 Cortina.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,141Posts Today

8,211Users online

Martin's Twitter