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  • FIRST POST
    • Kesteral
    • By Kesteral 2nd Mar 18, 12:05 AM
    • 11Posts
    • 0Thanks
    Kesteral
    Frozen condensation pipe, manual removal?
    • #1
    • 2nd Mar 18, 12:05 AM
    Frozen condensation pipe, manual removal? 2nd Mar 18 at 12:05 AM
    Hi.

    I have a frozen condensation pipe due the cold weather (I have a logic combi boiler)

    Unfortunately because the boiler is very high I can't get to the condensation pipe outside to thaw it. A neighbour told me they were advised by an engineer to pull out the condensation pipe from the boiler as a short term measure, then to restart the boiler.

    So I tried it and it worked. I reconnected the condensation pipe back into the boiler and it's been working since. Actually the engineers I rang said they would do something similar but actually cut the pipes.

    I just wanted to check whether what I've done is safe? There's no risk of gas leak is there? Otherwise it just seems like I've saved myself some money by doing it myself instead of getting an engineer to do the same thing
Page 1
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 2nd Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    • 37,305 Posts
    • 157,155 Thanks
    silvercar
    • #2
    • 2nd Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    • #2
    • 2nd Mar 18, 9:05 AM
    Sounds OK, though you should have used a bucket or something to catch the condensate as it came out of the boiler.

    If it now all works it suggests that the pipe has defrosted outside.
    • calleyw
    • By calleyw 2nd Mar 18, 9:54 AM
    • 8,756 Posts
    • 15,781 Thanks
    calleyw
    • #3
    • 2nd Mar 18, 9:54 AM
    • #3
    • 2nd Mar 18, 9:54 AM
    I have the same issue. But wont do it because I am too scared I would dislodge something and !!!!!! the whole thing.

    So sat here in the cold


    Yours

    Calley x
    Hope for everything and expect nothing!!!

    Good enough is almost always good enough -Prof Barry Schwartz

    If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try -Seth Godin
    • blackshirtuk
    • By blackshirtuk 2nd Mar 18, 11:38 PM
    • 518 Posts
    • 292 Thanks
    blackshirtuk
    • #4
    • 2nd Mar 18, 11:38 PM
    • #4
    • 2nd Mar 18, 11:38 PM
    You will have released the blockage in the boiler but if the condensate pipe is still frozen it will accumalate again and stop the boiler firing.

    I called a plumber and he just cut the condensate pipe outside about a foot down from where it came out of the wall. He said just leave like that for a days during the cold spell then when it warms up he will replace the 22mm pipe with a 32mm pipe with lagging so it won't happen again
    • Norman Castle
    • By Norman Castle 3rd Mar 18, 9:37 AM
    • 7,092 Posts
    • 5,852 Thanks
    Norman Castle
    • #5
    • 3rd Mar 18, 9:37 AM
    • #5
    • 3rd Mar 18, 9:37 AM
    How difficult would it be to fit an internal drain tap to the condensate pipe?
    Don't harass a hippie. You'll get bad karma.

    Never trust a newbie with a rtb tale.
    • malky39
    • By malky39 3rd Mar 18, 12:54 PM
    • 660 Posts
    • 164 Thanks
    malky39
    • #6
    • 3rd Mar 18, 12:54 PM
    • #6
    • 3rd Mar 18, 12:54 PM
    No risk of a gas leak, aslong as you only touch the condensate, Disconnect it at the boiler and stick a bucket underneath to catch the condensate then when the weather gets better reconnect it. You could also pour warm water down the disconnected condensate to ensure it is fully clear
    Last edited by malky39; 03-03-2018 at 12:57 PM. Reason: t
    • mchale
    • By mchale 3rd Mar 18, 1:14 PM
    • 1,718 Posts
    • 953 Thanks
    mchale
    • #7
    • 3rd Mar 18, 1:14 PM
    • #7
    • 3rd Mar 18, 1:14 PM
    I have the same issue. But wont do it because I am too scared I would dislodge something and !!!!!! the whole thing.

    So sat here in the cold


    Yours

    Calley x
    Originally posted by calleyw

    Can you get to pipe, if so a kettle of boiling water poured over it shud melt ice blockage.
    ANURADHA KOIRALA ??? go on throw it in google.
    • calleyw
    • By calleyw 3rd Mar 18, 1:49 PM
    • 8,756 Posts
    • 15,781 Thanks
    calleyw
    • #8
    • 3rd Mar 18, 1:49 PM
    • #8
    • 3rd Mar 18, 1:49 PM
    Can you get to pipe, if so a kettle of boiling water poured over it shud melt ice blockage.
    Originally posted by mchale
    I fixed it in the end thanks.

    But the majority of the pipe work is inside the front porch and most of it is lagged. And the inch or two outside that goes in to the down pipe is also lagged.

    So I poured some hot water over the lagged part that's outside and then put an electric heater in the porch. After an hour managed to restart the boiler and it has been fine ever since.

    And now the temp is rising as the snow has gone. When a new boiler is put in, in the next couple of years bigger pipe and more of an angle.

    Yours

    Calley x
    Hope for everything and expect nothing!!!

    Good enough is almost always good enough -Prof Barry Schwartz

    If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try -Seth Godin
    • bris
    • By bris 3rd Mar 18, 3:55 PM
    • 7,662 Posts
    • 6,671 Thanks
    bris
    • #9
    • 3rd Mar 18, 3:55 PM
    • #9
    • 3rd Mar 18, 3:55 PM
    How difficult would it be to fit an internal drain tap to the condensate pipe?
    Originally posted by Norman Castle
    No competent installer would fit the condensate outside unless it was absolutely necessary.


    It's frowned on to disconnect the condensate pipe from the boiler as carbon monoxide can travel down this path, that's why a gas safe registered engineer will never recommend this method.


    When going outside I always up the pipe to 40mm and fit flexible pipe inside that too so the flexi pipe takes the condensate and the 40mm pipe creates a barrier to it, so it needs extreme temps to freeze it.


    P.s never use boiling water, hot water is all you need, giving it a few taps along the way to dislodge the ice.
    Last edited by bris; 03-03-2018 at 3:57 PM.
    • telemarks
    • By telemarks 3rd Mar 18, 4:22 PM
    • 179 Posts
    • 128 Thanks
    telemarks
    Our combi condense pipe froze up. So I took the hacksaw to it inside, and popped a bucket underneath for now

    Looking at it, the pipe drops down from the boiler, then almost horizontally for 1/2 a metre inside, before going another 1/2 meter horizontally through the thick old outside wall. It then does a short horizontal right angle into a pipe above a drain.

    Thinking about it, would it be better to have a bit of a slope on this pipe? and then vent downwards? Obviously I'll insulate as much as I can when re-plumbing, but would more slope help prevent freezing? Can I use 15mm push fittings? so I can easily dismantle if it happens again? (current was solvent weld 15mm)

    As a PS, I did enjoy the One Show last night. My wife had issued dire warnings not to, so as soon as took out the hacksaw and applied to the pipe, but it was lovely to show her exactly the same hacksaw and trick been used on the One Show.
    • blackshirtuk
    • By blackshirtuk 5th Mar 18, 5:37 PM
    • 518 Posts
    • 292 Thanks
    blackshirtuk
    Can I use 15mm push fittings? so I can easily dismantle if it happens again? (current was solvent weld 15mm)
    Originally posted by telemarks
    Are you sure you don't mean 22mm. Most condensate discharge pipes used to be 21.5 mm solvent weld pipes. I believe the requirement for new installations is 32mm. The bigger the pipe the less likely to freeze solid.

    I am by no means an expert, but would think the bigger the fall the better, as you are trying to keep the condensate moving so that it doesn't freeze.
    • Mr.Generous
    • By Mr.Generous 5th Mar 18, 6:15 PM
    • 1,763 Posts
    • 2,658 Thanks
    Mr.Generous
    Ive seen quite a few done with 15mm copper, I remember loads froze up a few years ago and they started fitting bigger plastic pipes after that winter. A lot of boilers will have a pressure release valve copper pipe, often a small bend facing back to the brick coming out, that can get confused with the condensate pipe.
    • robin58
    • By robin58 5th Mar 18, 6:51 PM
    • 2,418 Posts
    • 2,759 Thanks
    robin58
    I heard a plumber (the good ones, you know salt of the earth, local, non-celebrity type) on the radio give the above posters advice to clear the boiler condensation pipes for an emergency fix.

    He also mentioned that there is now available a additional piece of kit they can now add which collects the condensation dribbling out of the pipe and dumps it out in one go once it's full enough. Don't know if that is outside or inside if in the correct area to be able to do it.
    The more I live, the more I learn.
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    How little I know.!!
    • telemarks
    • By telemarks 5th Mar 18, 8:27 PM
    • 179 Posts
    • 128 Thanks
    telemarks
    Are you sure you don't mean 22mm. Most condensate discharge pipes used to be 21.5 mm solvent weld pipes. I believe the requirement for new installations is 32mm. The bigger the pipe the less likely to freeze solid.

    I am by no means an expert, but would think the bigger the fall the better, as you are trying to keep the condensate moving so that it doesn't freeze.
    Originally posted by blackshirtuk
    Yes, you are right, when I came to replace I realised it was 21.5mm solvent weld, and replaced it with like, but with more gradient :
    If it stops raining tommorow, I'll insulate the outside 21.5mm pipe, and encase in a 40mm, hopefully that will fit it
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 6th Mar 18, 12:01 AM
    • 37,305 Posts
    • 157,155 Thanks
    silvercar
    I heard a plumber (the good ones, you know salt of the earth, local, non-celebrity type) on the radio give the above posters advice to clear the boiler condensation pipes for an emergency fix.

    He also mentioned that there is now available a additional piece of kit they can now add which collects the condensation dribbling out of the pipe and dumps it out in one go once it's full enough. Don't know if that is outside or inside if in the correct area to be able to do it.
    Originally posted by robin58
    There is. It also can be fitted around the hot pipe coming out of the boiler, providing some warmth to the condensate making it even less likely to freeze.

    https://www.worcester-bosch.co.uk/professional/products/accessories/condensesure
    • maisie cat
    • By maisie cat 19th Mar 18, 11:56 AM
    • 420 Posts
    • 503 Thanks
    maisie cat
    Our boiler is in the loft and about once a year we have to disconnect the condensate pipe and have the boiler drain into a container for a day or so. We were told that that is the best way to deal with our situation
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