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  • FIRST POST
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Feb 18, 3:06 PM
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    foxgloves
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse
    • #1
    • 27th Feb 18, 3:06 PM
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse 27th Feb 18 at 3:06 PM
    I've decided to start a diary to show that it's possible to change from a terrible money waster into a a bit of a budgeting ninja. OK, I'm not perfect....we all have slip-ups now & again....but I am proud that by my budget efforts & our surprising willingness to change from big silly spenders (we really were a pair of narnas!) to really quite sensible people, we managed to become debt-free. We paid off around 35k & really, just learned how to live differently And you know what? We really enjoy it! Turned out that all that spending & having to have stuff immediately didn't really make us happy. Who'd have thought it?
    Pre-LBM, my principles for money management were:
    1) Buy pretty much whatever I wanted when I wanted. Overdraft was seen as another word for 'more of my money'.
    2) Open bank statements, look at the balance through semi-closed eyes, carefully fold & replace in envelope & put in drawer.
    3) Tell myself bank balance is fine because it's only 3 weeks till pay-day.
    4) Always withdraw useful wodge of cash the week before pay-day just in case that pesky bank was planning to show me up in the supermarket by stopping my debit card.
    5) Never budget - why waste time on this when my own system worked so well?
    6) Tell myself not to worry about savings. They would be nice, but I 'didn't earn enough'
    That was about it, really. I didn't budget at all & made no effort to spend within my means. I lived outside my means from the age of 19 & didn't become debt-free till my 40s!
    The LBM was huge. I had it first & my partner showed initial signs of resistance, but when he saw my debts disappearing, he soon wanted in on the act & is now like a different person with money.
    Two years ago, we borrowed a modest sum to help us buy a car, We always knew this would happen & we made sure we saved up a good deposit. It was always our intention to re-pay the loan early & we did manage a nice overpayment of 2000 last year. However, our 2nd overpayment was almost ready to pay in when we had a string of expenses which we didn't want to put on credit cards, so we used our loan overpayment money to pay those. Last year was difficult in many ways & although we didn't return to our previous naughty spendiness, I think I started to lose some of my focus. Before Christmas, our Loan Pay Down Fund (LPDF) was down to just 60. Now it is already up to 421, really just from little savings, selling a few bits & bobs here & there. One thing I'm going to be really BIG on this year is 'Shopping from home', as in doing that first, to see if a spend can be avoided. I've got off to a really good start with that, starting with my new year de-cluttering & have found all sorts of useful stuff that will save me money further down the line. I also intend to do a full kitchen cupboard audit. Although I'm a DFW 'Small things' regular, I've never done a DFW diary before, so I'm going to use it to focus my efforts & get that LPDF up to 1000, then the next 1000, etc, asap. If you are the sort of person who gets excited about the contents of other people's cupboards & the satisfaction of saving a few quid here & there, then do join me for sharing ideas, laughs & moans, & I promise to throw in a few tales from my Spendy Decades - I have kept a journal for a lot of my adult life & I absolutely wince now, reading some of those diary entries about my cavalier attitude to money. I suppose they show that if I can change, anyone can! Oh well, onwards! I loved being debt-free & just a small amount of effort will mean that I can soon be again.
    F x
    Last edited by foxgloves; 27-02-2018 at 3:13 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
Page 50
    • joedenise
    • By joedenise 12th Apr 19, 10:47 AM
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    joedenise
    What a funny dream! But you're right about being set in frugal mode and not wanting to waste food, LOL!

    Denise
    • Blackcats
    • By Blackcats 14th Apr 19, 11:37 AM
    • 5 Posts
    • 39 Thanks
    Blackcats
    I'm another one who came to my financial senses at a late stage. I recognise myself in the stories and reflections here (not the tinned tomatoes dream though!,,,).
    I'm not quite a natural at sensible money management yet though. This week I had reason to go to a large branch of a supermarket with a large honewares department. I was still entranced by the pretty cushions, colourful towels, candles that will apparently smell of wonderful, nonsensical things like moon dust and Unicorn breath. Artificial cactus, mugs with spring flowers on them. All of these things lured me towards them. I don't need more cushions, I've never needed an artificial cactus in a sparkly pot. I even bargained with myself - if I used my Nect*r points then these treasures wouldn't even cost me any money, despite having allocated the points for Christmas spends. If I just bought a packet of scented tea lights then they would fill my world with joy even though I've got a drawer full of tea lights. But I did walk away because I want to achieve my aspiration of retiring in 2 years more than I want more "stuff".
    I was also ridiculously chuffed to receive two interest payments on my savings this week. I darent even speculate how much interest I've paid over the years but to get even a small amount of interest from a financial institution was a great feeling.
    It's a slow process but I'm getting there and diaries like this with your inspiring money management ways and your contributors really help. I even stood in that supermarket last week and thought "what would Foxgloves do?" And I concluded that you wouldn't buy a plastic cactus no matter how sparkly the pot was!
    • joedenise
    • By joedenise 14th Apr 19, 12:49 PM
    • 6,113 Posts
    • 45,096 Thanks
    joedenise
    At least you argued yourself out of all those things Blackcats and didn't give into the whims.

    Definitely an achievement to remember that your points are for your Christmas spends rather than for stuff you don't need.

    Budgeting does get easier over time. It's taken me years to really feel in control of my money.

    Denise
    • Blackcats
    • By Blackcats 14th Apr 19, 1:47 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 39 Thanks
    Blackcats
    Thank you Denise. I do feel a bit pleased with myself and I can smile at my savings head arguing with my spending head. I've also just done a quick review of my savings pots and moved some money to an account with better interest. This is something I would never have done in the past - mostly because I didn't actually have much in savings but also because I didn't worry about interest rates. Just as well because some of my creditcard interest rates were probably astronomical. I used the snowball method to prioritise howto payoff my debts which really made me think about the impact of interest rates.
    I remember back in the 80's/90's when mortgage interest rates hit10% plus. Every letter from the building society meant a further interest rate increase. I always paid my mortgage but they were very tough times. Ironically now I have some savings interest rates are comparatively very low indeed.
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 14th Apr 19, 4:26 PM
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    foxgloves
    Lol, Blackcats, I know the home department of which you speak, & you are damn right I wouldn't have bought a plastic cactus in a sparkly pot!! I have only once owned plastic flowers. I was eight years old & inherited them from a great, great aunt's house when she died. They were hideous, but I liked them because they were in a plastic coach.... as in the old fashioned type pulled by horses. There were no horses included, just this bizarre arrangement of plastic blooms poking out from a black plastic coach. A completely pointless item, though I expect my elderly relative liked them. And you know what? Those flowers were binned once we no longer played with them but they will still be there, somewhere in landfill, never to biodegrade, because the sobering thing about plastic is that every piece of it ever made is still around. We can throw it away, but if it doesn't biodegrade, there Is no 'away'. So that plastic coach full of equally plastic flowers is still lurking somewhere & you can be sure that all those plastic cacti in sparkly pots will be destined to follow! A greener buy would maybe be a real little cacti potted into an unusual container you already own & topped with a layer of found pebbles.
    I do always look at that home section, though. There are some nice things, but also some that are clearly just passing trends. I'm sure landfill will be chocka with fake reindeer heads in years to come.... Future archaeologists will probably think it was something bizarre & ritualistic.
    Well done for resisting temptation.
    Oh, & like you, I remember the insane mortgage interest rate rises in the Thatcher years..... hard to explain to younger generations that interest rates actually hit 16%, but they did, & they were scary times.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 15th Apr 19, 5:26 PM
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    foxgloves
    More fab garden freebies today, as I did a mini plant swap with a friend. I gave her several of the pink primroses I divided up yesterday, plus half a dozen of a fancy variety of sunflower which I grew from a stash of out of date seed packets found at Mum's house. She brought me some sweet peas plus some zinnia, verbena & ipomea babies. Most gardeners end up with a surplus, so swapping is a lovely way of getting a bit more variety without being sucked into the dangers of Garden Centre Temptation. Oh.... & my friend had also been dividing up her snowdrops, so she gave me a bag of those too, which I shall plant at the hedge side of my new winter garden bed. I intend to swap a squash plant for those, but they've not germinated yet, as I don't sow them until the middle of April.
    Anyway, a very pleasant afternoon catching up over coffee & warm home-baked scones with blackberry jam. Simple things, but it did us all good. Sometimes simple things are just what we need.
    Take care all,
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 22nd Apr 19, 7:11 AM
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    foxgloves
    Morning Campers,
    Well, the washing machine is churning, I've got everything out ready to make bread, then it's set to be a big gardening day for both of us. This will defo NOT involve a garden centre visit, as with a bit of imagination, all our planned projects today can be carried out with stuff we already own or can improvise.
    Really aiming for a productive day out in the sunshine.
    Enjoy the BH, everyone. I shall aim to pop back & share what we've achieved today.
    Spring Blessings to all,
    F xx
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 22nd Apr 19, 4:19 PM
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    foxgloves
    What a happy & productive day in the garden & I'm pleased to say that we stuck to our plans of using what we'd got, rather than making any sneaky little trippettes to the garden centre.
    I've planted out some hellebores I brought back with me from Mum's garden, & Mr f used some of the rustic poles he saved when cutting down the thicket at the back of the shed to make a wigwam for the extra sweet-peas I was given last week. I've also potted up some seedlings from Mum's stash of out of date seeds, while Mr f emptied the remaining compost bins & re-sited them.
    On the food front, I planted the aubergines & cukes into their final position, planted out the first lot of lettuces & potted the next lot into modules, & motivated by the success of the sweet-pea wigwam, we used more of the 'recycled rustic pole stash' to rebuild the climbing beans structure.
    Another free win.... Our garden hose isn't long enough. Mum had a longer one, but still not long enough. Today Mr f found an old connector joint in the shed & managed to join them together. Pleased with that as it's saved on buying more plastic as well as cash.
    More veggie garden jobs lined up for tomorrow. Ready for a scrub now & for the kettle to go on.
    Cheers,
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 22nd Apr 19, 9:55 PM
    • 1,666 Posts
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    Onebrokelady
    Hellebores are one of my most favourite flowers,I bought three for my 50th birthday from The Lost Gardens Of Heligan,two white ones and an almost black purple one,I can't remember the varieties but they have been in my front garden for 6 years in June and flower like little troopers every year,I don't do anything to them,I just let them do their thing, they are beautiful

    Well done on the hose repurposing, I have a really lovely long hose that reaches my whole back garden but for some reason the outside tap has stopped working,I'm going to ask my brother in law to have a look at it when he has time,when I move the chickens I will need the hose to be working to hose down their run

    I have spent a very enjoyable day in the garden as well today,after losing my enthusiasm I seem to have got it back all of a sudden,I've been reading a blog called Down To Earth and I think it's that that has inspired me,it's Australian so you have to take that into account but I just love her lifestyle,it's so how I would like to live and I'm now feeling as if I could actually do it despite working
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = 17,630 Paid To Date = 1,835 Total Now Owed = 15,795
    Emergency Fund = 1,330 Xmas savings = 350
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 23rd Apr 19, 5:10 PM
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    foxgloves
    Glad you've rediscovered your gardening mojo, OBL. I have always loved growing things, but I must say I'm finding that being outside tending our garden is tremendous therapy after the two years I've just had. You'll probably remember I lost my Mum last Autumn... well, the year before that, I lost my Dad & also a dear friend who I'd known since my first week at university aged 18. It's been a proper sad old time & although there have been nice things too, all the stuff that's needed doing following both parents dying so close together has seemed neverending - though the end should be in sight soon as I accepted full asking price on their house last week. Fingers crossed it all goes through. So... my time spent out in the garden this year, sowing & planting, clearing & planning, and just pottering around & enjoying the flowers & wildlife, it's all doing me lots of good.
    I did have to go to the garden centre today. I went to get my packet of sweetcorn seed out to check the sowing time & couldn't find it. Most unusual, as I sort everything I intend to sow over the coming year into my seed box which is arranged month by month. Checked my main stock box of seeds - not in there either. It wouldn't be anywhere else, so I obviously hadn't bought any after all. I now have a pack ready to go. Things I didn't buy while there: Coffee & scone in the cafe, bedding plants (they looked gorgeous, but honestly, why was I even looking?? My greenhouse is rammed with homegrown plants), large ceramic pot. I shall need one soon to pot up a very big conservatory plant, but I didn't want to spend the money today.
    And I'm eeking out bagged compost like mad by mixing it with our own home made stuff. I've looked at those root-trainer modules in the past for sowing beans, but have never succumbed as I like to re-use big yoghurt pots/takeaway coffee cups, as I've been doing today.
    Must get up & walk around in a minute as I can stiffen up after a day's gardening when it's still early in the season - the joys of being a woman of a certain age, lol!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 24th Apr 19, 2:01 PM
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    foxgloves
    Well, here I am again, at my big WW1 era desk, which my lovely old Grandad rescued from somewhere or other back in the 1980s & refurbed for me to use. It's up in the little front bedroom which serves as 'Foxgloves HQ'. I share it with our cat, who has his nice snuggly bed in here right next to the radiator......a snuggly bed, I might add, that he has spurned for the last fortnight, having decided that my chair in the lounge is more to his liking!
    I've been clearing a few routine financial tasks this morning, ready to tackle my next Big Budget Day, which is this Friday. I've made no secret on here of the fact that I've come to financial common sense later in life than many, & one thing about this whole budgeting lark is that once you get going with it, you keep finding all sorts of little 'tweaks' which make the job easier or more effective, or hopefully, both. Something I've been dong for the past couple of months is that as Budget Day approaches (it's always on pay-day or as soon after pay-day as I can manage), I take a sheet of A4 paper (from my recycled stash of course!), head it 'Things to remember for Budget Day' (the clue's in the name) & then I weigh it down with a cat paperweight a friend bought me years ago. He's a big heavy smooth pebble painted to look like a snoozy grey & white cat & he's perfect for the job. Anyway, there's no mystery to this sheet of paper.........I use it to jot down things I need to factor into the coming month's new budget. Not the usual routine things like 'Allocate grocery money' or 'Pay our Personal Spends', but those extra things which are easy to forget when your head's full of minutiae like 'How many shopping Saturdays in May' or 'Is this the month that X is due?', etc. So far, my piece of paper has enscribed upon it the not exactly riveting fact that mr f 'only requires 10 travel budget this time', that I have 'already paid & accounted for the campsite fees', how much I need to put aside for his Lordship's cattery stay & a flag-upin big letters that I need to decide how best to budget for festival day tickets. There's also a little note reminding me that I need to pay an additional 10 to our 'Just for points' credit card to cover tickets for seeing Ben Elton, as I'd written down the price of this as 10 less than it actually was......probably wishful thinking on my part! While this might seem like micro-management, I do find it's proving very useful, because I have had a few occasions where i've worked hard on the new month's budget, written it all perfectly in my Money Book, then realised half an hour later that I've missed something & will now have to change the figures or pay something from a different pot, etc. Much better to have my new 'Piece of recycled paper' system on which I can jot these things as I think of them........Oh, look, here's another one........a modest birthday meal at the weekend.....which budget shall I use for that? How much will I need to allow? Oh, & another.........can I buy that big ceramic pot for a triffid-like conservatory plant in May, or would it be better for the budget to wait until June?
    Such trifling details in many ways, but if they keep our finances on the straight & narrow after so many years of being such twits, I really don't care how many notes I make!
    It must be time for a coffee now, do you reckon?
    Have a good Wednesday all,
    F xx
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 24th Apr 19, 3:37 PM
    • 1,666 Posts
    • 10,337 Thanks
    Onebrokelady
    Glad you've rediscovered your gardening mojo, OBL. I have always loved growing things, but I must say I'm finding that being outside tending our garden is tremendous therapy after the two years I've just had. You'll probably remember I lost my Mum last Autumn... well, the year before that, I lost my Dad & also a dear friend who I'd known since my first week at university aged 18. It's been a proper sad old time & although there have been nice things too, all the stuff that's needed doing following both parents dying so close together has seemed neverending - though the end should be in sight soon as I accepted full asking price on their house last week. Fingers crossed it all goes through. So... my time spent out in the garden this year, sowing & planting, clearing & planning, and just pottering around & enjoying the flowers & wildlife, it's all doing me lots of good.
    I did have to go to the garden centre today. I went to get my packet of sweetcorn seed out to check the sowing time & couldn't find it. Most unusual, as I sort everything I intend to sow over the coming year into my seed box which is arranged month by month. Checked my main stock box of seeds - not in there either. It wouldn't be anywhere else, so I obviously hadn't bought any after all. I now have a pack ready to go. Things I didn't buy while there: Coffee & scone in the cafe, bedding plants (they looked gorgeous, but honestly, why was I even looking?? My greenhouse is rammed with homegrown plants), large ceramic pot. I shall need one soon to pot up a very big conservatory plant, but I didn't want to spend the money today.
    And I'm eeking out bagged compost like mad by mixing it with our own home made stuff. I've looked at those root-trainer modules in the past for sowing beans, but have never succumbed as I like to re-use big yoghurt pots/takeaway coffee cups, as I've been doing today.
    Must get up & walk around in a minute as I can stiffen up after a day's gardening when it's still early in the season - the joys of being a woman of a certain age, lol!
    F x
    Originally posted by foxgloves
    You certainly have had a tough couple of years I do find it quite therapeutic to be out in the garden,I couldn't do anything out there yesterday or today and I felt quite down this morning, was also raining and quite dark so a big change from the weekend so that didn't help
    On the bright side I noticed the rain that spills out of the gutter in my front garden lands in the square pallet I'm using to grow stuff,i think I need to rig something up the catch some of the water or it will be water logged but at the moment I'm looking at it as a free water supply right by my growing area
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = 17,630 Paid To Date = 1,835 Total Now Owed = 15,795
    Emergency Fund = 1,330 Xmas savings = 350
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 24th Apr 19, 3:38 PM
    • 1,666 Posts
    • 10,337 Thanks
    Onebrokelady
    Oops meant also to say well done on dodging the scone and coffee,you are a stronger willed woman than me and good luck with the house sale
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = 17,630 Paid To Date = 1,835 Total Now Owed = 15,795
    Emergency Fund = 1,330 Xmas savings = 350
    • Blackcats
    • By Blackcats 24th Apr 19, 6:04 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 39 Thanks
    Blackcats
    Dear Foxgloves, you have mentioned that you hope that your diary helps others so I wanted to share some recent wins for me based on your wise words. Firstly I had a family "do" at the weekend and in my head decided I had nothing to wear. However, a look through my summer clothes revealed a maxi skirt that I had bought a couple of years ago. I bought it on the basis that I was going to an evening party where there might be midges in the garden and so I obviously needed a new maxi skirt to protect me from midges. I had another maxi skirt but during spendy years that was an irrelevance. Anyway I had worn this skirt just once to the party. So I washed and ironed the skirt and teamed it with a favourite top and voila - a fresh outfit. Oh yes - even better - I'd also bought a pair of sandals and handbag to match the skirt - spendy years were full on spendy!
    And tomorrow I have a friend popping round for elevenses. Normally I would go to the shops and buy numerous cakes, biscuits etc. Tomorrow I am making a loaf of bread and getting some yummy sausages from the freezer for sausage sandwiches and I've got biscuits left over from Easter. So a nice (but not necessarily nutritious) lunch concocted by shopping from stores already at home.
    Thanks Foxgloves and contributors!
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 24th Apr 19, 6:55 PM
    • 4,667 Posts
    • 40,612 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    I have a massive recycled notebook at work (unused worksheets cut in half and held together with a bulldog clip) and I write down literally everything I need to do. Some days this is big stuff like 'write Y10 reports' and others it's 'get your stuff from the printer'. It really helps me get through the day in a productive way. I keep attempting it with the finances but have not been successful so far. Must keep trying, and do something a bit different.
    NST April #11 nsd = 12 1 debt vs 100 days #5 553/553 Pay all your debt by Xmas '19 #56: 997.60/5750
    • joedenise
    • By joedenise 24th Apr 19, 7:15 PM
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    joedenise
    I too am going to have to take a leaf out of your book foxgloves as out for dinner on Friday and again Saturday next week. Two meals out and definitely can't afford 2 new outfits! I'm sure I must be able to concoct a couple of outfits from what's in the wardrobe!

    Denise
    • Honeysucklelou2
    • By Honeysucklelou2 24th Apr 19, 7:29 PM
    • 1,558 Posts
    • 7,798 Thanks
    Honeysucklelou2
    I have a finance notebook, a work notebook and home notebook. It sounds onerous but it doesn't feel that way, but helps ,e to keep each area of life managed and in the same way factor in spends as they are coming up.
    paydbx2019 #93 572.38/10,100 .
    School trips 1016/1269..
    EF 210
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 25th Apr 19, 10:36 AM
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    foxgloves
    Ooooh, yes get that water saved, OBL, especially if you're on a water metre. mind you, I had a similar idea here a while back. When our neighbours had their extension built, we started getting a water spout effect off the corner of their roof every time we had big rain.....I'm talking really big rain here, as in those stormy deluges......I ran outside to put a large container right where the water cascade wass landing & the power of it knocked it over all over my feet, so I haven't pursued that idea since!
    Everywhere is so dry in our garden atm. Was looking forward to rain yesterday but we had a couple of showers for no more than a few minutes & the borders are still as dry as anything. Hopefully well get more of a downpour today. Hope so.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 25th Apr 19, 10:48 AM
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    foxgloves
    Blackcats - Great thinking on the outfit. It takes ages to get out of that spendy mindset of 'I'm having a night out, therefore I automatically have nothing whatsoever to wear, my wardrobe is an empty husk & I must hie me away to the city centre at speed to buy a new outfit or I will look like a tramp"........
    I would also like a new maxi-skirt, but thankfully can't find anything I like. I have a nice maxi-dress as one of my coming birthday presents from mr f, so I don't really need a skirt too. I'm still intending to dye an old one dark purple, as there isn't really anything wrong with it that a change of colour wouldn't fix. Must remember to add machine dye to my Saturday list for town & get this project progressed.When I did my wardrobe overhaul a few weeks back - I think I did pop on here & bore everyone about that - I identified the garments that would be most useful for my wardrobe & they were a dress (I know I have two for my birthday this weekend as I chose them & supplied the discount code, lol!), a denim skirt, as mine is much worn & starting to look not-in-a-cool-way-tatty, and a black tunic top which will go with all my jeans/trousers plus a multi-colour jacket which its difficult to pair things with. Note that 'new maxi-skirt' did not appear anywhere on this list, so I am determined not to buy one unless an item of such utterly bargainaceous loveliness hoves into view that to leave it in the shop would be an act of foolishness beyond compare!
    Go me! I'm so over the Spendy Decades these days!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 25th Apr 19, 10:52 AM
    • 4,779 Posts
    • 26,638 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Joedenise - Yes, time to look at that wardrobe creatively & see what new outfits you can come up with. I've recently discovered how nice a black dress I swapped with my sister looks with some vividly patterned green leggings. It's quite a short dress & the leggings are footless, so it makes a nice outfit with black sandals, whether flat ones or my high heeled pair of wedges, which I had forgotten about until I did my big wardrobe overhaul. Sometimes things you don't think will work at all turn out to look quite good.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = 320 2016 = 210 2017 = 304 2018 = 418 2019 = 60
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