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  • FIRST POST
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
    • 4,096Posts
    • 21,206Thanks
    foxgloves
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse
    • #1
    • 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse 27th Feb 18 at 4:06 PM
    I've decided to start a diary to show that it's possible to change from a terrible money waster into a a bit of a budgeting ninja. OK, I'm not perfect....we all have slip-ups now & again....but I am proud that by my budget efforts & our surprising willingness to change from big silly spenders (we really were a pair of narnas!) to really quite sensible people, we managed to become debt-free. We paid off around 35k & really, just learned how to live differently And you know what? We really enjoy it! Turned out that all that spending & having to have stuff immediately didn't really make us happy. Who'd have thought it?
    Pre-LBM, my principles for money management were:
    1) Buy pretty much whatever I wanted when I wanted. Overdraft was seen as another word for 'more of my money'.
    2) Open bank statements, look at the balance through semi-closed eyes, carefully fold & replace in envelope & put in drawer.
    3) Tell myself bank balance is fine because it's only 3 weeks till pay-day.
    4) Always withdraw useful wodge of cash the week before pay-day just in case that pesky bank was planning to show me up in the supermarket by stopping my debit card.
    5) Never budget - why waste time on this when my own system worked so well?
    6) Tell myself not to worry about savings. They would be nice, but I 'didn't earn enough'
    That was about it, really. I didn't budget at all & made no effort to spend within my means. I lived outside my means from the age of 19 & didn't become debt-free till my 40s!
    The LBM was huge. I had it first & my partner showed initial signs of resistance, but when he saw my debts disappearing, he soon wanted in on the act & is now like a different person with money.
    Two years ago, we borrowed a modest sum to help us buy a car, We always knew this would happen & we made sure we saved up a good deposit. It was always our intention to re-pay the loan early & we did manage a nice overpayment of £2000 last year. However, our 2nd overpayment was almost ready to pay in when we had a string of expenses which we didn't want to put on credit cards, so we used our loan overpayment money to pay those. Last year was difficult in many ways & although we didn't return to our previous naughty spendiness, I think I started to lose some of my focus. Before Christmas, our Loan Pay Down Fund (LPDF) was down to just £60. Now it is already up to £421, really just from little savings, selling a few bits & bobs here & there. One thing I'm going to be really BIG on this year is 'Shopping from home', as in doing that first, to see if a spend can be avoided. I've got off to a really good start with that, starting with my new year de-cluttering & have found all sorts of useful stuff that will save me money further down the line. I also intend to do a full kitchen cupboard audit. Although I'm a DFW 'Small things' regular, I've never done a DFW diary before, so I'm going to use it to focus my efforts & get that LPDF up to £1000, then the next £1000, etc, asap. If you are the sort of person who gets excited about the contents of other people's cupboards & the satisfaction of saving a few quid here & there, then do join me for sharing ideas, laughs & moans, & I promise to throw in a few tales from my Spendy Decades - I have kept a journal for a lot of my adult life & I absolutely wince now, reading some of those diary entries about my cavalier attitude to money. I suppose they show that if I can change, anyone can! Oh well, onwards! I loved being debt-free & just a small amount of effort will mean that I can soon be again.
    F x
    Last edited by foxgloves; 27-02-2018 at 4:13 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
Page 3
    • redofromstart
    • By redofromstart 2nd Mar 18, 1:57 PM
    • 1,774 Posts
    • 10,729 Thanks
    redofromstart
    foxgloves, onebrokelady I'm in the midlands too but moved here many years ago. Where I come from we have nice floury baps (quit sniggering) and a cob is what they call a mardy in these parts as in 'I had a right cob on the first time I asked for nice floury baps in the sandwich shop and the staff just stood and laughed'.

    I used to have cash in an envelope in the days of student poverty and it worked really well. If the envelope was empty I did without as I couldn't get anything out of the bank, the cash was my pub job wages. It was a good discipline to get into, its just to easy to spend on cards now. Who else remembers when you couldn't pay by card in shops and you had to write a cheque? That was useful sometimes the day before pay day.

    ETA oh I so get the birthday spends from the bad old days. OH still does it actually, I still have Christmas and birthday money to spend but I am better at not rushing out to do it now.
    Last edited by redofromstart; 02-03-2018 at 1:59 PM.
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 2nd Mar 18, 2:12 PM
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    foxgloves
    Yes, redofromstart, I can remember a student friend here suggesting we just get a 'cob' for our lunch one day when we were out & about & I thought 'Eh? What on earth are we going to do with that?' cos if you went in a bakers shop where I grew up & asked for a cob, you'd be given a round crusty loaf. I love all the regional dialect variations.

    And yes, I totally remember standing in a shop & writing a cheque. I also remember my Mum telling me 'You can't spend what you haven't got' & I gave her a withering look & said I could because I'd 'got cheques left'. I didn't actually have a credit card till much, much later. My bank kept up a relentless pressure on me to have one (I guess they could see from my bad money habits what a nice little earner this would be for them from all the interest!) & I am the sort of person who reaches the point that the more I am pressurized to do something, the more I resist it. I think if I'd taken them up on the offer when my spendyness was at its peak, my overall debt would have been quite a lot more than it was.
    I am so different now with Christmas & birthday money. For instance, Mum gave me some money for Christmas & I spent it on a lovely new hairbrush (my old one was in bits), a gorgeous make-up bag & some new make-up items. I enjoyed choosing absolutely every item & still smile when I see that pretty bag sitting on my dressing table. I love useful presents now. (And.......I spent the money only ONCE as have learned my lesson!)
    Last edited by foxgloves; 02-03-2018 at 2:15 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
    • 1LuckyLady
    • By 1LuckyLady 2nd Mar 18, 2:30 PM
    • 834 Posts
    • 7,710 Thanks
    1LuckyLady
    Foxgloves, Dh is planning what to spend his bonus on and he's spent it at least 3 times in his head already and its not going to come through until the April payday!! He's good as gold though to be fair, he likes "looking" and seeing what is available but often when it comes to it he doesn't actually buy it! (thankfully!) With his last bonus it was going to be a new iPhone even though his current one was only a year old (mine had started not holding its charge very long and I'd told him which was a big mistake!) so he thought he'd have a new one and as I "needed" a new one I could have his old one. Well many months have passed and my old phone is still not holding charge but it holds it for as long as I need it to and the money is still in the bank

    On the rolls/cobs/baps conversation, I was brought up with bread cakes, when I started work they thought I'd gone mad ( I worked in a different county) as they called them teacakes (now a teacake to me was one with fruit in but to them that was a fruit teacake!) Now living in S. Wales they're rolls. The look on my eldest's face when I asked him to get a bread cake out just now was a picture!
    Sticking with the "Small things" thread to keep up us on the straight and narrow.
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 3rd Mar 18, 10:41 AM
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    foxgloves
    1luckylady - I did laugh at 'breadcake'. I imagined my smallest nephew thinking he was going to get a cake, & then being given a bread roll!

    Morning everybody else. A lot of busy 'Shopping from home' going on here today. Talk to you later x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
    • Baileys Babe
    • By Baileys Babe 3rd Mar 18, 12:01 PM
    • 2,253 Posts
    • 10,971 Thanks
    Baileys Babe
    I'm subscribing too Foxgloves, I love the way you write & I love reading about your spendy old ways
    Originally posted by 1LuckyLady
    I'm subscribing as well. 1LuckyLady is right you write so well.
    • DawnW
    • By DawnW 3rd Mar 18, 2:41 PM
    • 5,054 Posts
    • 39,899 Thanks
    DawnW
    I'm subscribing as well. 1LuckyLady is right you write so well.
    Originally posted by Baileys Babe
    And me, far too nosy to be left out
    NSDs for June 9 / 10
    Groceries / cleaning / toiletries / pet food etc £162.73 / £250
    Fuel 99.95 / £100


    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 3rd Mar 18, 4:56 PM
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    foxgloves
    Aww, thanks Baileys babe & DawnW. I will try not to disappoint. Re the bad old spendy years, I will try to remember to include the trip to London which coincided with a day the bank decided to put a stop on my bank card. (Shudders at the memory) Should have been a wake-up call, but wasn't.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 3rd Mar 18, 5:17 PM
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    • 21,206 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Hi diary readers,
    Well today's contribution to getting shot of that blimmin' loan has been doing lots of 'shopping from home'.
    We visit my Mum fortnightly now she's on her own & we take it in turns to buy lunch. Because of the snow, I was pretty sure we wouldn't be able to make it so hadn't put any money aside for this. Not that we go anywhere swanky. Mum likes paninis, coffee & cake at a garden centre as much as anything, but that can add up over the weeks. So....I've shopped from home & made lunch to take with us - fish & leek crumble. I remembered I'd got a box of trimmings in the freezer from when I divvied up our last big fresh fish order so that was perfect.....plus the lonely billy-no-mates leek in the veggie basket. Even managed to use up some out of date butter in the crumble topping. So a 'free' lunch tomorrow.
    I usually take Mum a small gift so made a few cheese scones too.
    Then it occurred to me that I shan't see her again before Mothering Sunday so I mixed up a quick apple & cinnamon loaf cake which I will foil & pop in her freezer tomorrow so she can enjoy that next weekend. The other 2 little gifts I wrapped using tissue paper & a pretty gift bag from my recycled wrappings stash, & a home made gift tag. It's amazing the resources that are knocking around at home. So I've probably saved a wodge of cash today. The less I dip into the monthly 'cushion' I leave in our bank account when I set the budget each month, the more cash can potentially be transferred across to the Loan Pay Down Fund.
    Have been in kitchen nearly all day, but dinner is cooking itself in the slow cooker. All I need to do is lift the meat out & pull it, thicken the sauce & mix it back in. And there will be tasty leftovers.
    Have a peaceful Saturday night all.....unless you are going out on the razz.....if so, enjoy.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
    • Honeybug
    • By Honeybug 3rd Mar 18, 6:11 PM
    • 20 Posts
    • 184 Thanks
    Honeybug
    Love the shopping from home idea. The snow has made me realise how much you can actually do without, because you just cant get to the shops. I am also a big bullet journal fan and have now started a new page on just this topic
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 3rd Mar 18, 6:41 PM
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    foxgloves
    Hi Honeybug,
    It's my first go at a bullet diary. So far, so good, although I found ruling up all the pages a bit tedious. For each month, I have a calendar, then daily sections for 'to do' lists, then also monthly grocery budget tracker page, monthly meal planner, a page to log my daily steps & calorie burn & a page for notes.
    After all the monthly sections, I have general pages: birthdays, holiday planner, Christmas presents, Christmas baking plan, appointments/meetings for 2019 & my reading list. I do like being very organised & it does save money, as it's the popping out to buy things for stuff we've forgotten about that can really add up. Leaving no time to shop around can also mean spending more than intended.
    Re shopping from home.....I'm intending to go through my craft stuff soon & see what I've got which could viably be turned into Christmas or birthday presents.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
    • Honeybug
    • By Honeybug 3rd Mar 18, 7:43 PM
    • 20 Posts
    • 184 Thanks
    Honeybug
    Thanks foxgloves,

    I started bullet journaling january 2017, so on my second one now, before this I used numerous notepads, rough books and lists, so the bullet journal really works for me. I only have monthly pages, daily lists and musings, and different lists and challenges. I do a cash saving challenge for xmas where i rule up a box a week which i cross off when i deposit £3 in a sealed moneybox. It paid for those inevitable christmas works do's etc last year and as it was quite a small amount each week felt achievable. I could quite happily wax lyrical about bullet journals all day, so will leave it there. But really glad you are finding yours useful. I agree that ruling up those monthly pages can be tedius though
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 3rd Mar 18, 8:17 PM
    • 369 Posts
    • 991 Thanks
    Onebrokelady
    Onebrokelady - I can see you understood instantly what I meant the other day when I mentioned the bad old days when I'd take a load of cash for grocery shopping, then when it came to more, use my cards & fritter the cash on other things. No, it definitely wasn't just you, as we did that frequently, & you really find you are wasting some serious money, don't you, when you do it. That's something I'm glad to say we nipped right in the bud when we started serious debt-busting. I bloody LOVED being debt-free (apart from mortgage, of course) & that's why I am determined to get shot of this loan.
    During my Spendy Decades, a good example of this cash/card thing was every year when I received birthday money. I can't remember exact sums now, but I'd usually get around £100 in total, & I'd go straight off to the city centre to spend it because I loved shopping - (I still do, but honestly get more fun these days looking, researching stuff, trying on & choosing maybe ONE thing, as I don't have all the money problems afterwards). So I'd have this birthday cash burning a hole in my purse & I'd think 'Right I need a jacket & a top'. So I'd have a great time looking & trying on & I'd come out with a dress, jacket & shoes! That would usually come to a good bit more than the £100 cash, so I would pay using my debit card. Of course I'd still have that luvverly wodge of cashola & that was my REAL birthday money, right? What I should have done, is go to the bank & pay it into my account to offset the clothes spend, but no, it's my birthday money & spending on the card didn't feel like birthday money even though it was, so I'd continue to treat myself. The sort of thing I liked to buy were things for my house, books, CDs, DVDs, skincare (particularly a well-known brand with its own counter & the 'bonus-time' offers......), accessories, craft stuff, magazines & vintage stuff. So by the time I'd finished in town, I'd spent that £100 birthday money at least twice. But was that the end of it? No, I actually used to manage a triple spend! I'd get home & a few days later, I'd see something else I wanted & I'd tell myself that because the jacket I bought was an 'essential purchase', it shouldn't really have come from my birthday money, so say the jacket cost £70, I'd mentally 'credit' myself another £70 of birthday money to go & buy something extra! Because I managed to convince myself I'd diddled myself out of £70 by buying something useful!! Oh my days, what a baddie....& so silly too, as when my salary landed in my account each month, I was usually in credit for less than two weeks before living in fear of the bank cancelling my cards & not being able to fill my car up with petrol to get to work! Oh I was such a twit! I just could not go back to that cavalier attitude to money. I think it would actually make me ill now!
    This is Foxgloves signing out of her confessional!
    x
    Originally posted by foxgloves
    You are actually ex money wasting twin,I would do exactly the same with birthday and Xmas money and because I work hard I would justify it every time what an pair of plonkers, at the moment Iíve gone so far the other way I donít want to spend anything anywhere ever again but Iím sure this wonít last
    My money was wasted on magazines ,craft stuff, books and the odd item of clothing,Iíve not bought a magazine since my LBM when I worked out how much they were costing me per month,Iíve told myself Iím not allowed to buy any more craft supplies until I have completed every craft project I have got waiting to be done and ive been through my clothes and worked out what I have and what I might need,Ive recently lost weight so some of my summer clothes might not fit now ,I had to replace all my jeans as I had gone down a size and thatís basically all I wear but I wonít need any now for ages,I bought three pairs the same working on the one to wear one for the wash and one for spare rule so I might need a couple of tops but thatís all as some stuff that was too small now fits me
    I was paid last week and actually have money left this month that isnít allocated to anything,itís going in my new savings account when I open it,it annoys me now when I think I must have had money spare most months but just spent beyond my means and now Iím in debt and having to pay it back via a DMP,I do feel more in control of my finances than I ever have now though which makes me happy
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = £17,630 Paid To Date = £770.00 Total Now Owed = £16,860
    Emergency Fund = £400.00 Xmas savings = £250.00
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 3rd Mar 18, 8:23 PM
    • 369 Posts
    • 991 Thanks
    Onebrokelady
    I forgot to say re the magazines,I have a serious addiction to them and have had to go cold turkey,I had so many piled up at one point I just didnt have time to read them and when I did read them it felt like a chore, now Ive stopped buying them I havent missed them once, my dear mum treats me to a couple of monthly mags which I still have and Im enjoying reading them now because they are the only ones I have,I then pass them back to her to read and she then gives them to my niece
    Ive also started to use my library again as I read constantly so buying books was costing a lot
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = £17,630 Paid To Date = £770.00 Total Now Owed = £16,860
    Emergency Fund = £400.00 Xmas savings = £250.00
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 3rd Mar 18, 8:40 PM
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    • 21,206 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Onebrokelady - I can completely identify with what you say. I have to try not to think about how much more financially secure I would be if I'd saved regularly instead of frittering my salary away for so many years. I had a serious magazine habit too. I must have bought easily 12 - 15 each month.....all the big glossy ones.....homes & interiors, gardening, vintage stuff, cookery, knitting, craft & more general ones too. I buy very few now. I like 'Feel good you' as find it so positive but that's only 4 times a year. My Mum & sister give me some of their cast-offs & I sometimes visit the magazine stall on our market. He sells non-current issues 3 for £2 or £2.50, depending on what they are, so that is a good way of getting a few 'new' craft or food mags to read too x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
    • redofromstart
    • By redofromstart 3rd Mar 18, 8:48 PM
    • 1,774 Posts
    • 10,729 Thanks
    redofromstart
    I have the app from the library that lets me download current magazines for free, worth checking what your local one does.

    I try to look forwards rather than backwards or it can all get a bit overwhelming.
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 3rd Mar 18, 8:51 PM
    • 369 Posts
    • 991 Thanks
    Onebrokelady
    foxgloves, onebrokelady I'm in the midlands too but moved here many years ago. Where I come from we have nice floury baps (quit sniggering) and a cob is what they call a mardy in these parts as in 'I had a right cob on the first time I asked for nice floury baps in the sandwich shop and the staff just stood and laughed'.

    I used to have cash in an envelope in the days of student poverty and it worked really well. If the envelope was empty I did without as I couldn't get anything out of the bank, the cash was my pub job wages. It was a good discipline to get into, its just to easy to spend on cards now. Who else remembers when you couldn't pay by card in shops and you had to write a cheque? That was useful sometimes the day before pay day.

    ETA oh I so get the birthday spends from the bad old days. OH still does it actually, I still have Christmas and birthday money to spend but I am better at not rushing out to do it now.
    Originally posted by redofromstart
    Iím doing the cash in envelopes thing now,my food money is being divided up into weekly envelopes and at the moment my savings are in envelopes ( the savings are going into the bank though as I donít want lump sums of cash hanging around my house,just in case I get burgled or more likely spend it )
    Where I am now in the Southwest bread is called all sorts,so there are rolls and baps depending on how artisanal the bakers are
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = £17,630 Paid To Date = £770.00 Total Now Owed = £16,860
    Emergency Fund = £400.00 Xmas savings = £250.00
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 3rd Mar 18, 8:58 PM
    • 369 Posts
    • 991 Thanks
    Onebrokelady
    Onebrokelady - I can completely identify with what you say. I have to try not to think about how much more financially secure I would be if I'd saved regularly instead of frittering my salary away for so many years. I had a serious magazine habit too. I must have bought easily 12 - 15 each month.....all the big glossy ones.....homes & interiors, gardening, vintage stuff, cookery, knitting, craft & more general ones too. I buy very few now. I like 'Feel good you' as find it so positive but that's only 4 times a year. My Mum & sister give me some of their cast-offs & I sometimes visit the magazine stall on our market. He sells non-current issues 3 for £2 or £2.50, depending on what they are, so that is a good way of getting a few 'new' craft or food mags to read too x
    Originally posted by foxgloves
    Mine were the glossy ones too,I love home interiors mags and would buy 7 each month what a waste of money, my mum buys me Woman and Home each month and they usually do a pack where you get Ideal Home included so I get my interiors fix that way
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = £17,630 Paid To Date = £770.00 Total Now Owed = £16,860
    Emergency Fund = £400.00 Xmas savings = £250.00
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 3rd Mar 18, 10:17 PM
    • 4,096 Posts
    • 21,206 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Redofromstart - agree about looking forward & not back, but I'm only human. At least I've learned from my idiocy (partner too, as he's been as bad in the past).

    Onebrokelady - Mum gives me her 'Woman & home' mag so it's nice to read that. I used to spend loads on stuff for my house......not expensive brands or gadgetry, as my style is more shabby chic/bohemian but all those hippy chic & vintage things added up & I absolutely could not resist antique/vintage fairs. I used to fit one in most weekends, whether I could afford it or not (invariably not!)
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 4th Mar 18, 5:59 PM
    • 4,096 Posts
    • 21,206 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Hi Diary readers,
    Back home by the fireside after our visit to Mum's. Saw some awesome snowdrifts on route!
    Today's loan-busting efforts have really just been both of us using our good money habits. Not frittering, not wasting food, that kind of thing...plus being grateful for a nice treat as Mum insisted on paying for coffee & cakes as we'd driven a long way in the fog to see her.
    The fish & leek crumble I made to take with us (to avoid a lunch spend) went down well, but when I assembled it, I'd made too much cheesy crumble, so I blagged a freezer bag from Mum & brought it home! I shall use it to top some of the leftover pulled pork & make another meal.
    Then a very unusual thing happened. Mr f decided he'd GOT TOO MUCH LUNCH!!! The lovely mr f is built like a brick privy & loves his food, so this is indeed a rare event! But like a good 'un, he carefully transferred it to a freezer box & has brought it home to eat another day.
    I have spent only £5 today, & some of that was a Mothering Sunday card so I could save on a stamp. And as I had my halo on, this was from my personal spends allowance, so no effect on our budget at all.
    Mum had been having a clear out & gave me a few craft magazines to try selling on ebay. I'll give them a go. I've sold many mags on there in the past, but it can be a bit random. All ebay bits & bobs of money go straight into our Loan Pay Down Fund, so I'll defo list them when I next do a batch of items.
    Hope everyone has had a productive pleasant day. Try & get a bit of relaxation tonight before Monday morning swings in again all too soon.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 5th Mar 18, 12:13 PM
    • 4,096 Posts
    • 21,206 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Morning readers,
    Well, my lergy really does seem to have gone on its way today, as has the snow, so I'm feeling ready to tackle the Spring......both all my gardening jobs (I grow a lot of food) & continued de-cluttering & thinking of ways to hasten that last bit of loan away.
    Today on my 'Things I need' list, I'd got 'Vegetable seeds' & 'Easter cards'. Now I've got lots of seeds left over from last year, so I sat down with my planting list & my seed box to double-check what I already have in stock. Classic 'Shop from home first'. That confirmed the need to buy only 8 packets of seed instead of 16, so I went ahead & ordered those & qualified for a free packet plus a 25p packet of tomato seeds. I already have tomato seeds, but will use these extra ones just in case I have any that fail to germinate, as I like to grow 12 tomato plants per year.
    The other item on my 'To buy' list was Easter cards. I like to send just a few each year to people who I know will appreciate receiving one. I'm trying to look at everything from a 'Shop from home first' viewpoint & a riffle through some unused craft supplies has uncovered a pile of yellow card, unused envelopes & some pretty craft papers. I know I have some odds & ends of ribbons in my recycled wrappings stash, & even though I'm not usually a card-maker, I'm reasonably crafty, so surely I can knock out 5 or 6 Easter cards for free? I shall attempt a simple design this afternoon. It just seems so silly to have resources sitting at home doing sweet bu*ger all, while I'm spending cash on something I can probably make myself. My current decluttering splurge is unearthing all sorts of useful stuff.

    2 more Prolific Academic surveys done this morning, taking my total to just under £35. When I cash out, I intend to transfer the money straight into our Loan Pay Down Fund. Still haven't had my Toluna money, but I do usually find them to be the slowest payers of the surveys sites I use, so I'm sure it will turn up.
    OK, am off to make some lunch (yes it has come out of the freezer, & no, I haven't popped out to buy anything to make it more interesting!)
    Hope everyone's getting off to a great start to the week. Remember, even really entrenched spenders/fritterers can change It was like a revelation to me that all those bags of stuff I used to come home with in the bad old days, simply could not make me as happy as being in control of my finances now does.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £800-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £259
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