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  • FIRST POST
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
    • 4,399Posts
    • 23,478Thanks
    foxgloves
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse
    • #1
    • 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse 27th Feb 18 at 4:06 PM
    I've decided to start a diary to show that it's possible to change from a terrible money waster into a a bit of a budgeting ninja. OK, I'm not perfect....we all have slip-ups now & again....but I am proud that by my budget efforts & our surprising willingness to change from big silly spenders (we really were a pair of narnas!) to really quite sensible people, we managed to become debt-free. We paid off around 35k & really, just learned how to live differently And you know what? We really enjoy it! Turned out that all that spending & having to have stuff immediately didn't really make us happy. Who'd have thought it?
    Pre-LBM, my principles for money management were:
    1) Buy pretty much whatever I wanted when I wanted. Overdraft was seen as another word for 'more of my money'.
    2) Open bank statements, look at the balance through semi-closed eyes, carefully fold & replace in envelope & put in drawer.
    3) Tell myself bank balance is fine because it's only 3 weeks till pay-day.
    4) Always withdraw useful wodge of cash the week before pay-day just in case that pesky bank was planning to show me up in the supermarket by stopping my debit card.
    5) Never budget - why waste time on this when my own system worked so well?
    6) Tell myself not to worry about savings. They would be nice, but I 'didn't earn enough'
    That was about it, really. I didn't budget at all & made no effort to spend within my means. I lived outside my means from the age of 19 & didn't become debt-free till my 40s!
    The LBM was huge. I had it first & my partner showed initial signs of resistance, but when he saw my debts disappearing, he soon wanted in on the act & is now like a different person with money.
    Two years ago, we borrowed a modest sum to help us buy a car, We always knew this would happen & we made sure we saved up a good deposit. It was always our intention to re-pay the loan early & we did manage a nice overpayment of £2000 last year. However, our 2nd overpayment was almost ready to pay in when we had a string of expenses which we didn't want to put on credit cards, so we used our loan overpayment money to pay those. Last year was difficult in many ways & although we didn't return to our previous naughty spendiness, I think I started to lose some of my focus. Before Christmas, our Loan Pay Down Fund (LPDF) was down to just £60. Now it is already up to £421, really just from little savings, selling a few bits & bobs here & there. One thing I'm going to be really BIG on this year is 'Shopping from home', as in doing that first, to see if a spend can be avoided. I've got off to a really good start with that, starting with my new year de-cluttering & have found all sorts of useful stuff that will save me money further down the line. I also intend to do a full kitchen cupboard audit. Although I'm a DFW 'Small things' regular, I've never done a DFW diary before, so I'm going to use it to focus my efforts & get that LPDF up to £1000, then the next £1000, etc, asap. If you are the sort of person who gets excited about the contents of other people's cupboards & the satisfaction of saving a few quid here & there, then do join me for sharing ideas, laughs & moans, & I promise to throw in a few tales from my Spendy Decades - I have kept a journal for a lot of my adult life & I absolutely wince now, reading some of those diary entries about my cavalier attitude to money. I suppose they show that if I can change, anyone can! Oh well, onwards! I loved being debt-free & just a small amount of effort will mean that I can soon be again.
    F x
    Last edited by foxgloves; 27-02-2018 at 4:13 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
Page 23
    • Kantankrus Mare
    • By Kantankrus Mare 11th Sep 18, 8:40 PM
    • 5,384 Posts
    • 13,844 Thanks
    Kantankrus Mare
    Enjoying Bake off here as well (my smiley faces dont seem to be working)

    So sorry re your Mum.........must be hard living so far away as well. Feels like being in Limbo.

    Been to the allotment on way from home and picked a fair few elderberries. They will go with my brambles in the freezer to make a batch of bramble and elderberry wine. What else do you do with your elderberries? Needless to say I havent picked them off stalks yet. They will keep till tomorrow night.
    Make £10 a day challenge 2018 Jan/£163.14/Feb £116.10/March £5,060.77/April £160.28/May £124.83/Jun £236.71/July £183.73/Aug £251.84/Sep £366.48/Oct £169.63/Nov £173.40
    Walk 2000 miles in 2017....1780.35 miles
    Walk 2018 miles in 2018...1646.73 miles
    Mortgage...£47,070£46,092£45,626.£44,182,£43,721
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 11th Sep 18, 9:33 PM
    • 4,126 Posts
    • 35,336 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    Boo hiss to the car failing it's MOT, but great news that you could cover it. It's so reassuring to know that things can be juggled and sorted without too much stress isn't it? I'm looking forward to getting back to those days for sure.
    The more I read about your jam and chutney making, the more I really want to do it. I picture myself all homely, in a cosy house, nice and warm with the lovely smell of chutneys through the house. It won't happen though, I will probably just make a massive mess and get stressed out and break something. But I promise I am still going to try.
    November in NY #20 NSD = 9 1 debt vs 100 days £328.51/£1685
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • savetosave
    • By savetosave 11th Sep 18, 11:28 PM
    • 116 Posts
    • 259 Thanks
    savetosave
    Please could I have the recipie for the Apple and ginger jam, it sounds lovely and I have apples to use up. ��
    • Chrystal
    • By Chrystal 12th Sep 18, 1:26 PM
    • 508 Posts
    • 3,340 Thanks
    Chrystal
    Please could I have the recipie for the Apple and ginger jam, it sounds lovely and I have apples to use up. ��
    Originally posted by savetosave
    Second this request as I also have apples to use up.... would it be alright using Braeburns as I have loads on the tree? AND does anyone know the cheapest place is to get jars from?

    So sorry about your Mum foxgloves. (((hugs))) XX
    I Believe.....
    That it isn't always enough, to be forgiven by others.
    Sometimes, you have to learn to forgive yourself.
    • joedenise
    • By joedenise 12th Sep 18, 2:02 PM
    • 5,598 Posts
    • 41,437 Thanks
    joedenise
    Chrystal - try your local freecycle or local facebay. Also worth putting a Wanted ad on them.

    Also ask around friends and neighbours.

    Denise
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 12th Sep 18, 4:05 PM
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    • 23,478 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Kantankrus - I've used elderberries successfully in hedgerow jelly. I just made jelly the standard way, but used a mixture of blackberries, elderberries, rosehips & haws. It was lovely with roast meats & made nice gifts.

    Cheap jars - Have never, ever bought jars. I save them all year round & sterilize them prior to use. Once people know you are a jam/chutney/marmalade maker, etc, they start offering you jars. There are times when I run short, but then as we eat our way through our stores, my jar stash starts building up again. We have a rule that when both my 'jar cupboard' & my emergency overflow jar box in the shed are both full, then I can only keep a 'new' empty jar if I get rid of one from my stash, so a 'One in-one out' policy, lol. Otherwise I think I might turn into a mad jar hoarder, lol.

    Oh, & hang fire a minute all those who want the apple & ginger jam recipe......I'm just finding it, oh, great, now cat is trying to slalom down back of armchair.......hang on.....
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 12th Sep 18, 4:18 PM
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    foxgloves
    OK, here is the apple & ginger jam recipe I use:

    6lbs cooking apples - peeled, cored & roughly chopped (the apples on our tree are Charles Ross, I think, which are good as cookers or 'eaters')
    2 pints water
    2 tsp ground ginger (taste as you go on, as I like a bit more)
    Finely grated zest & juice of 4 lemons
    4oz crystallized ginger, finely chopped (again, taste it till you are happy with the flavour balance)
    6lb ordinary white granulated sugar

    I'm assuming you can make jam, so no need for me to type out full detailed instructions, but you need to save a pile of the apple peels & cores & tie them up in a piece of muslin (or clean tea towel). Put the apples, lemon zest, lemon juice & water in your preserving pan & pop the muslin bag in too, tied to the pan handle. Bring to the boil & cook for 10 or 15 mins until the apples are soft. Squeeze all the liquid out of the bag back into the pan & discard the bag - this is just because there is useful pectin in the peels & cores, which will help the jam to set.
    Add both types of ginger & sugar. Stir well to dissolve sugar, then jam it as normal.
    This recipe makes about 9lbs of jam & it's lovely & autumnal on toast, buttered crumpets, porridge, etc.
    I used to make marrow & ginger jam before I had a big old apple tree, but I always make this one now.
    Enjoy!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 12th Sep 18, 4:46 PM
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    • 23,478 Thanks
    foxgloves
    And now for today's update.....
    I happened to mention to mr f that our grocery budget stands at £46.50 a week for the rest of this month & said 'I hope we can stick to that'. He said 'With everything you've been shoving in that freezer, we should get CHANGE from £46.50'. Decided to do a new freezer list before starting next week's meal plans. Oh my days! Talk about 'Shop from home first'. Ignore the rest of this post if you find the contents of people's freezers stultifying, but this is what we found (quantities given in portions):

    Re-fried beans (2), Hake (2), Plaice (4), Haddock (3), Pork steaks (1), Roasted aubergine curry (4), Carluccio's recipe for tomato pasta sauce (6), Curried mince & peas (2), Meatballs in chunky veg sauce (8), Pesto (6), Tomato & lentil soup (6), Golden lentil soup (4), tomato soup (4), courgette & watercress soup (3), Sorrel soup (1) & ratatouille (4). Also a tamale pie base & 100g lamb mince.
    Also 3 'tins' worth' of zizzed up fresh tomatoes, 450g rhubarb, 3 bags of french beans, 1.2kg fresh tomatoes to use for soups, sauces, etc., 2 sliced green peppers, 2 bags of blackberries, 7 pots of greengage compote, 5 bags of chillies, 1 pot of grapes, 6 tortilla wraps, 2 garlic flat breads, 1 large rhubarb crumble base, some leftover chorizo, 1 pot BBQ sauce, 2 pots of apple sauce & 3 containers of fresh stock (ham, chicken & lamb)..

    Hmmmm. "I hope we can manage on £46.50 & not overspend" was how this major freezer investigation began this morning. So, having written a decidedly 'Shop from home' meal plan for next week, (i.e EVERY NIGHT'S MEAL will come from the freezer), I started a shopping list, which is looking nicely small, We do need a few householdy things & a bit of fresh stuff, yoghurt, milk, eggs, that kind of thing, & cat food of course, but I think our freezer has now reached critical mass & we can save money by eating our supplies down. That's one of the great things about batch cooking, although our own home grown fruit & veg have been good to us this year (except for lettuce, spring onions & radishes, which sulked or succumbed to flea beetle!) I haven't put any little treats on the shopping list either. We have plenty of apples & pears and I will make mini-muffins (calorie counted, as is everything atm) for when we fancy something sweet.......hopefully I can fit a box of them in the freezer once all next week's meals start coming out.
    OK, so having already taken out 2 garlic flat breads & a pot of mixed chopped peppers to use in tonight's home made pizzas, I shall away down to the greenhouse for some fresh basil & a handful of cherry tomatoes.
    Cheers all - Oh, & thanks for the kind wishes for my very poorly Mum. It is much appreciated. No change & still desperately stressful, but we have to carry on, don't we, & keeping very busy with banal but useful tasks like freezer lists & meal plans does help keep a semblance of normality. I've blitzed my wardrobe too, but had better save that saga for another day.
    F xx
    Last edited by foxgloves; 12-09-2018 at 4:50 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 12th Sep 18, 9:57 PM
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    crazy_cat_lady
    I have a freezer in the kitchen and a small chest freezer in our outhouse. It's amazing, but always full. I am determined to eat my way through and minimise my grocery budget over the next couple of months. The kids are more fussy so I'll need to buy for them, but I should be happy for ages on this.
    Your enthusiasm for jam and chutney's is really rubbing off. I think it'll be a couple of weekends yet before I find the time, but I'm feeling quite enthusiastic about trying it. Chutney first.
    November in NY #20 NSD = 9 1 debt vs 100 days £328.51/£1685
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 13th Sep 18, 1:55 PM
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    foxgloves
    You should save loads if you eat your way down your freezer stores, CCL. I'd love a 2nd freezer for storing bags of homegrown & foraged fruit & veg, but our shed, though brick & a decent size is a long way from the house & we don't have any electrics laid on outside.
    Not much time today, as hospital visiting later, which involves travelling, but I did maintain my frugal habits in town. Parked on the outskirts for free & walked in. I needed to pay some money into the bank & buy cat food where I know it is cheapest. I enjoyed a quick browse of the local flea/vintage market, but didn't spend a single penny more than intended. Back in the Spendiferous Era, a mozy around town or city centre used to result in such shocking frittering. I so enjoy being in control of myself now - today I enjoyed the walking & sunshine as much as anything.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 14th Sep 18, 6:15 PM
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    • 23,478 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Remember that failed MOT? Well, the car is still sufficiently new to be under warranty, so we knew we didn't have to pay for the repair to the cable on which it failed, but we HAD been told we'd be charged £54 for the brake fluid change. I've got money saved in our Car Piggy for just such occasions, so this wouldn't have been a problem, but it turned out when mr f collected the car, that he had been wrongly informed & the brake fluid change is included in our service plan. That felt like a bit of potential car expenditure going in the right direction for once! Car Piggy cash untouched. I'm pleased about that, as I think there is unlikely to be enough in our service plan to cover the next big service, so I will be ahead on that at least.
    Our garden is still helping with debt-busting behaviour by producing food. Despite all the jamming & chutney, I don't feel I'm making much of an inroad into our apple crop yet, & the pears, while a much smaller crop than last year, are still going to provide us with fresh fruit for a good while. Four more courgettes picked today, plus a patty-pan squash and lots of cherry tomatoes & french beans. Chillies continue to ripen. I've got several strings of them hanging up to dry in the greenhouse eaves, some in the freezer & I shall soon need to string some more, before the plants give up for winter. I have managed to over-winter a chilli plant or two in the past, but our house is pretty cold & this isn't the easiest task, so I think I will just compost them this year, as they've worked very hard producing hundreds of fruits. It will soon be time to start properly clearing the garden & getting some autumn containers planted. I have some free plants & ivy waiting, which I divided up in Spring, so will just need to buy a few fresh bulbs. This will be a task to look forward to once our current schedule of hospital visiting reaches its inevitable sad conclusion. Despite the stress, I am planning properly & not resorting to old spendy behaviour patterns.
    Anyway, I've just another little annoying job to do.....sorting out 'my' bookcase so I can fit a pile of gifted magazines onto it & free up a bit of space elsewhere, & then I'm going to settle down for an evening of TV & reading my library book.
    Wishing everyone a peaceful evening,
    F x
    Last edited by foxgloves; 14-09-2018 at 6:18 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 15th Sep 18, 4:18 PM
    • 4,126 Posts
    • 35,336 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    Great news about the car Foxgloves - I bet you're pleased about that
    November in NY #20 NSD = 9 1 debt vs 100 days £328.51/£1685
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 17th Sep 18, 12:50 PM
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    • 23,478 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Too right, CCL, I was well pleased with it! That service plans has been a bit of a mixed blessing & we've both said we're not sure that we'd have another one, but at least this time there was no bill & that felt good.

    Well, I've just done my usual mid-month budget check-in. How can it be that time again already? I guess I know why, really....because the last month has passed in a haze of hospital visiting, long drives, stressing about poor Mum, all of which is still ongoing. I did feel I needed to touch base with the budget this morning, though, because I think it's important during difficult times to stay in control of those things where one still has some influence. So that's what I've been doing this morning. Findings?
    We're solvent. Grocery budget is on track. Mr f volunteered to get the grocery shopping yesterday (we were at the hospital all day on Saturday) & as we'd done that meal plan concentrating greatly on eating through our freezer contents, he came in nicely under budget by £10, even though he needed an extra bag of coffee (for work) & I had a couple of preserving oddments. Half of the remaining September grocery budget is in the petty cash purse, so I shall withdraw the rest of it & have a cash shop next time. Have you spotted the potential spendy pitfall I'm avoiding by doing that? £25 of the budget in cash form, £30 of it in bank........what has happened a few times is that the shopping will come to more than the £25 so it will go on visa debit for the full amount (rather than faffing about at the till) leaving that nice little £25 cash sum sitting in the petty cash purse calling 'Spend me, spend me, you know you want to, I could be a lovely pizza or a pair of pretty cappucinos & panninis, etc, etc'. This doesn't always happen.....sometimes as it's so near the end of the month, I simply take the cash out, pop it on my desk ready to use towards the next month's Savings Piggies payments. Anyway, temptation averted this time. The rest of the grocery budget will simply be withdrawn as cash & added to it. Sounds like something of nothing, really, but I do find it can be better to cut temptation off at the pass! If I've spent it on groceries, it can't then be wasted on something not in the budget (or on the diet!)
    Was pleased to see that everything was on course, anyway. In fact, I was only 43p out! I shall consider that a result!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • maryb
    • By maryb 18th Sep 18, 10:10 AM
    • 3,931 Posts
    • 48,873 Thanks
    maryb
    Good morning Foxgloves

    I usually hang out on the Old Style threads and Iím not sure how I came across your diary- must have been through following some links. Anyway I love your writing style and have read the whole diary. I admire all your growing and preserving - how did you ever find time when you were working.

    As regards freezer Tetris - have you ever considered bottling? Or canning as it increasingly seems to be called. You donít need a pressure canner if you are doing acid fruits and tomatoes Just check the ph with a testing strip for tomatoes as they are lower in acid with modern varieties and add some lemon juice if needed. Any jar lid with a dimple will do so you can check if it has sealed. This is good for jars of spaghetti sauce and is much lower in salt and sugar than bought pasta sauces.

    Wishing you strength and comfort for what you are facing with your mum
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 18th Sep 18, 11:49 AM
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    foxgloves
    Hello Maryb,
    Glad you enjoyed reading my diary - yes, I did do lots of baking, preserving, etc, when I was working full time. I used to stay up a lot later then, so I would sometimes get in, eat dinner, watch TV or whatever, then around 9pm, I'd have a burst of energy so would often decamp to the kitchen to bake, paint a cupboard door or stick some blackberries on to cook for jam.
    I haven't tried bottling, except for sun dried cherry tomatoes in oil & they were one big mouldy mess! I do have bottling instructions in several books, so maybe I will give it a go sometime. A Labour Party comrade was desperate to teach me a few years back, but I stuck to my jam & chutney making. I make sauces too, which last quite well in jars, & have made cordials & elderberry vinegar plus pickles. Pickled courgettes go down very well in our house. I adapted an old recipe for 'bread & butter pickles'. This week"s meal plans are hugely based on using freezer stores. I've taken 2 containers of roasted aubergine curry out for tonight & that's freed up a whole corner of a drawer!
    When I first discovered the MSE forums, I did post on the Old-style threads but I moved to DFW daily small things thread because I love a daily task list! I started my dfw diary more recently to show people just beginning their debt-busting, that it is truly possible to change even very longstanding bad money habits.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • maryb
    • By maryb 18th Sep 18, 12:11 PM
    • 3,931 Posts
    • 48,873 Thanks
    maryb
    Good luck if you do try bottling. I have got into it to the extent I have a proper pressure canner bought when the dollar exchange rate was a LOT more favourable, which means I can do meat as well. Mainly use it for chicken stock, chilli con carne and curry base but it has saved me so often when I would otherwise think it would take too long to defrost something
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 19th Sep 18, 6:46 AM
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    • 23,478 Thanks
    foxgloves
    That's really interesting, maryb. I know bottling (or 'canning') has always been big in America. I love that scene in Garrison Keillor's novel 'Lake Woebegon days' when everyone is doing so much bottling, they are sneaking out at night & leaving bottled fruit & veg on people's doorsteps just to get rid of it! I never get anything that good left on my doorstep!
    F
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 19th Sep 18, 10:39 AM
    • 4,399 Posts
    • 23,478 Thanks
    foxgloves
    A moment's true satisfaction earlier when I removed another container from the freezer for tomorrow's meal. The space didn't last long. I popped down to the greenhouse to see how my strings of chillies are drying & decided to cut the rest of this year's basil plants. So now I'm just having a coffee and a pear (which fell off the tree as I went past with the basil!) & then I shall make pesto. And yes, it will be going in the freezer. We are nowhere near being able to defrost it yet!
    I love pesto making. The smell is so redolent of summertime.....a taste of summer to enjoy during the colder months. When I sold my previous house, the person who bought it was the one who came for a viewing when I was halfway through making some pesto. I wondered afterwards if he was influenced by that hit of summer fragrance.......he certainly didn't seem too overly bothered by the damp kitchen & two rotting skirting boards, so maybe so!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 19th Sep 18, 9:26 PM
    • 4,126 Posts
    • 35,336 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    I LOVE pesto. Bet home made is amazing.
    November in NY #20 NSD = 9 1 debt vs 100 days £328.51/£1685
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 20th Sep 18, 7:39 AM
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    • 23,478 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Me too, CCL. And it's easy peasy! Basil leaves, olive oil, garlic, little bit of salt, pine nuts (I sometimes like to use walnuts or almonds) - blitz up in a blender, then stir in the cheese. That's it!
    I save little plastic pots with lids for freezing it.
    You need a lot of basil to provide sufficient leaves, but it did well this summer because if the heat.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
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