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  • FIRST POST
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
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    foxgloves
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse
    • #1
    • 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse 27th Feb 18 at 4:06 PM
    I've decided to start a diary to show that it's possible to change from a terrible money waster into a a bit of a budgeting ninja. OK, I'm not perfect....we all have slip-ups now & again....but I am proud that by my budget efforts & our surprising willingness to change from big silly spenders (we really were a pair of narnas!) to really quite sensible people, we managed to become debt-free. We paid off around 35k & really, just learned how to live differently And you know what? We really enjoy it! Turned out that all that spending & having to have stuff immediately didn't really make us happy. Who'd have thought it?
    Pre-LBM, my principles for money management were:
    1) Buy pretty much whatever I wanted when I wanted. Overdraft was seen as another word for 'more of my money'.
    2) Open bank statements, look at the balance through semi-closed eyes, carefully fold & replace in envelope & put in drawer.
    3) Tell myself bank balance is fine because it's only 3 weeks till pay-day.
    4) Always withdraw useful wodge of cash the week before pay-day just in case that pesky bank was planning to show me up in the supermarket by stopping my debit card.
    5) Never budget - why waste time on this when my own system worked so well?
    6) Tell myself not to worry about savings. They would be nice, but I 'didn't earn enough'
    That was about it, really. I didn't budget at all & made no effort to spend within my means. I lived outside my means from the age of 19 & didn't become debt-free till my 40s!
    The LBM was huge. I had it first & my partner showed initial signs of resistance, but when he saw my debts disappearing, he soon wanted in on the act & is now like a different person with money.
    Two years ago, we borrowed a modest sum to help us buy a car, We always knew this would happen & we made sure we saved up a good deposit. It was always our intention to re-pay the loan early & we did manage a nice overpayment of £2000 last year. However, our 2nd overpayment was almost ready to pay in when we had a string of expenses which we didn't want to put on credit cards, so we used our loan overpayment money to pay those. Last year was difficult in many ways & although we didn't return to our previous naughty spendiness, I think I started to lose some of my focus. Before Christmas, our Loan Pay Down Fund (LPDF) was down to just £60. Now it is already up to £421, really just from little savings, selling a few bits & bobs here & there. One thing I'm going to be really BIG on this year is 'Shopping from home', as in doing that first, to see if a spend can be avoided. I've got off to a really good start with that, starting with my new year de-cluttering & have found all sorts of useful stuff that will save me money further down the line. I also intend to do a full kitchen cupboard audit. Although I'm a DFW 'Small things' regular, I've never done a DFW diary before, so I'm going to use it to focus my efforts & get that LPDF up to £1000, then the next £1000, etc, asap. If you are the sort of person who gets excited about the contents of other people's cupboards & the satisfaction of saving a few quid here & there, then do join me for sharing ideas, laughs & moans, & I promise to throw in a few tales from my Spendy Decades - I have kept a journal for a lot of my adult life & I absolutely wince now, reading some of those diary entries about my cavalier attitude to money. I suppose they show that if I can change, anyone can! Oh well, onwards! I loved being debt-free & just a small amount of effort will mean that I can soon be again.
    F x
    Last edited by foxgloves; 27-02-2018 at 4:13 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
Page 19
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 6th Aug 18, 8:39 PM
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    foxgloves
    Well, I thought I'd share the little 'Debtisode' of the pink & purple shoes I mentioned. This is a story from many years ago, back when I was first getting into debt......a way of life which was to last for pretty much the next 25 years.
    Are you sitting comfortably? I love shoes & boots, & back in my younger days, during the sales, I was more than capable of visiting pretty much every shoe shop in our local city centre. On one such sale rummage I found the most glorious shoes. I like purple & I like unusual things. These shoes were constructed from bright pink, bright purple & mauve leather, stitched together with sort of dark purple leather thonging. I'd never seen anything like them & I HAD to have them. There was only one problem. They were the only pair left & they were a size 4. In the absence of a pair in the correct size, I actually saw this as a positive thing. I'm a size 5, so that's very nearly a 4, isn't it? As in..... the shoes were 'almost' the right size for me, not a size 3 or a 7 or a 9.....you get my drift. So I tried them on & they were sooooo tight. Did it stop me? Nope! I convinced myself that the leather would soon stretch & they would become a size 5. So onto the unauthorised overdraft they went!
    And you know what? The Magic Shoe-Stretching Pixies never did visit. There was not even one iota of stretch going on because they were so damned uncomfortable, I couldn't wear them. I limped around town in them on about three occasions before giving them to a charity shop (it was a long time before selling on ebay was an option). And I can remember STILL thinking I was the victim here! The shoes had been sized as a particularly small '4', the shop should have ordered more 5's, etc. Of course the truth of it was that I'd been a very silly narna wasting her (& the bank's) money as usual. The LBM was still about 25 years away. Better late than not at all though!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 6th Aug 18, 10:38 PM
    • 1,089 Posts
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    Onebrokelady
    Omg,I have done the same thing,I did need some shoes for my daughters graduation so the need was there but I saw this pair and I had to have them,I have size 4 feet and these were a 3.5 now in fairness to myself I can sometimes get away with this size in one particular shop,but not this shop and not these shoes,I bought them and spent the day of the graduation in agony becasue they were just too tight,I used the logic that they would stretch but of course that didn't happen .........guess where they ended up
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = £17,630 Paid To Date = £1,519 Total Now Owed = £16,111
    Emergency Fund = £300 Xmas savings = £190
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 7th Aug 18, 8:20 AM
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    foxgloves
    Lol, glad it's not just me, then! Oh & that's reminded me......I bought an expensive pair of blue shoes for my graduation. I don't like blue (apart from denim) & they had such high heels that once I'd tottered across the stage to collect my degree, I barely wore them again. Can remember a fellow student (who was ridiculously sensible with money) asking me why anybody would buy shoes too uncomfortable to walk in & I just looked at her like she'd lost the plot. Another classic waste of money on my part though......& another win for the charity shop! I'm so different now, despite still loving boots, etc.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 7th Aug 18, 8:24 AM
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    • 23,997 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Soup-making planned for today. Aiming to use up various bits from the freezer too, to make room for a useful stash of 'free' soup, seeing as how I've either grown the veg or have the ingredients in stock already. Will report back later.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 7th Aug 18, 5:05 PM
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    foxgloves
    Oooh well that was a useful morning. I'd picked a whole basket of lovely big juicy tomatoes & a busy session in the kitchen today has turned them into 6 portions of Carluccio's pasta sauce & 7 portions of Cranks tomato soup (love that old book...mine has fallen apart). I also defrosted some home made ham stock from & got a batch of golden lentil soup going in the slow cooker. Enjoyed the cooking, but not so much the freezer tetris trying to get all my containers in there!
    Kept some tomato soup back for tonight's meal. Will use up last of the sourdough for cheese on toast to go with it.
    Plenty more produce to deal with, but that's it for today.
    Haven't been out, so haven't spent a single penny.
    Off to do the veg watering now & fetch the laundry in. Am truly ready for some proper rain now.....it's probably waiting till we go camping!
    Cheers,
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • Toni'sfriend
    • By Toni'sfriend 7th Aug 18, 5:29 PM
    • 1,707 Posts
    • 16,718 Thanks
    Toni'sfriend
    That sounds like my idea of heaven. I love making soup and sauce - all that chopping and stirring is so therapeutic. haven't heard of Cranks. I'm off to look that up.
    Sympathise with trying to get it all in the freezer though.
    • Sayschezza
    • By Sayschezza 7th Aug 18, 8:20 PM
    • 345 Posts
    • 2,956 Thanks
    Sayschezza
    At 74 you would think I had more sense than to dither over a coat in the JS sale that's only available in xs when I am a L but ......

    I haven't ordered it.
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 7th Aug 18, 8:29 PM
    • 4,249 Posts
    • 36,423 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    Once I bought size 5 DMs because I wanted blue but they didnít have them in a 6. They were fairly quickly handed down to my smaller sister...
    December in the Tardis #16 nsd = 8 New life = new debt
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 8th Aug 18, 11:18 AM
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    foxgloves
    Oh it sounds like lots of us have been at it! Buying shoes in the wrong size, I mean. I'd never do it again, that's for sure!
    Sayschezza - well done for not ordering that coat in the wrong size. I bought a new winter coat 2 years ago (planned & budgeted for). I bought the correct size then - a 16 - but my weight has crept up to an 18 during those 2 years & I have only worn that lovely coat twice because it's too tight. This year, my goal is to be able to wear it....comfortably.buttoned up.....by the time the cold weather arrives. It's a waste of money if it spends another winter languishing away in my wardrobe.

    Toni'sFriend - I love the Cranks book. I bought it in the 1980s when it first came out in paperback. I've never been a vegetarian but I do eat lots of meat-free meals. There are recipes in there I've been cooking for years. Cranks used to have a few London restaurants. I once visited the one in Covent Garden......it was wholesome tasty filling stuff & nice cakes!
    I could do with replacing my pbk copy as it is in several pieces & falls apart when I pick it up.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • angela110660
    • By angela110660 9th Aug 18, 6:42 AM
    • 780 Posts
    • 2,012 Thanks
    angela110660
    Thumbs up here also for Cranks paperback but mine is a bit of a wreck too these days! But still very useable. Sadly never got to one of their restaurants though.
    Free films - 2009: saw 7 films. 2010 saw 7 films. 2011 saw 7 films. 2012 saw 5 films;2013 saw 7 films; 2014 and 2015 saw 1 in each. Nothing since!
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 9th Aug 18, 7:24 PM
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    foxgloves
    It's got some recipes in I've used for decades, Angela: the chickpea croquettes, which arw falafel in all but name, the lovely tomato soup, spiced bread pudding (my Dad's absolute favourute right up to when he died last year), the cheesy lentil wedges, country biscuits, macro-rice, lemon cake, date slices, etc. My copy is in bits, the cover is off & it's scribbled all over with my notes.
    F
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 9th Aug 18, 7:36 PM
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    • 23,997 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Had a little bit of a price conundrum today. Here's what happened. I went in a little local independent shop & bought an item on my shopping list for £12, even though I knew I could buy it at our local W**trose for £10. This goes against the grain with me these days, but I was happy to do it. The little indie shop has on two occasions ordered products especially for me when I've been unable to purchase them elsewhere, & has a good range of ingredients (including more unusual stuff) in stock in different sizes with minimal packaging. The owner is very knowledgeable about his stock too - something which isn't as obvious in a supermarket. So I spent that extra couple of quid with good grace because I would miss this small business if it closed.
    I kind of made the money back through not having to pay for parking, as mr f was working in our local town today & he also donated his coffee loyalty card points so I could have a free coffee & biscotti!
    Off for a soak in the bath now.....over 12,000 steps today & my daily target is only 7,000. My feet feel like plates of mince!
    Cheers all,
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 10th Aug 18, 1:46 PM
    • 4,249 Posts
    • 36,423 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    I definitely feel your pain with the step count Foxgloves
    December in the Tardis #16 nsd = 8 New life = new debt
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 10th Aug 18, 3:10 PM
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    • 23,997 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Lol..I've spent all my life being an exercise dodger, CCL, but when I watched a programme a few years ago (I think it was 'Horizon') about the importance of NEATS in weight loss, it really motivated me to think 'Move' rather than 'Exercise'. I remember 3 couples calorie expenditure being monitored over a morning & the couple who walked around town just doing their shopping before cleaning their house, burned more calories than the couole who did an intensive workout at the gym but then sat down for the rest of the morning. So I don't do nearly as much sitting as I used to. Every single item of exercise paraphernalia I've ever bought has just been a waste of money as I never used any of it after the initial couple of days of novelty. At least with my bike I can use it as a means of transport!
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • Onebrokelady
    • By Onebrokelady 12th Aug 18, 8:57 PM
    • 1,089 Posts
    • 5,948 Thanks
    Onebrokelady
    Well done for supporting a local business,I know the prices are normally slightly higher but so long as it's something you need and they aren't charging ridiculous amounts I think it's a fair trade off, last year I needed a deck scrubber for cleaning the chicken run, I had seen a fancy wooden one in my local Wilkos so went to buy it but they had sold out so I went to the local hardware store and they had the same one but it was actually cheaper, I always check there if Im buying any hardware
    Just keep swimming
    Original Debt Owed Jan 18 = £17,630 Paid To Date = £1,519 Total Now Owed = £16,111
    Emergency Fund = £300 Xmas savings = £190
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 14th Aug 18, 7:49 PM
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    foxgloves
    Agree re local indie businesses, OBL. I read somewhere that for every £1 spent in a local independent shop, around 80p of it stays in the local community. When we spend in big chains, esp those with HQs abroad, most of that money goes straight out of the country.....& of course tax affairs are often 'organised' to avoid paying a fair share in the UK, aren't they? I'm happy to pay a little more to support a local small business....as long as the price differential isn't a p*sstake.
    F
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • enthusiasticsaver
    • By enthusiasticsaver 14th Aug 18, 7:55 PM
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    • 16,340 Thanks
    enthusiasticsaver
    I have to say that providing you can afford it and have the time then supporting local businesses is well worth it. We have an independent bookshop which I know the owner has given 2 years to see if it can sustain given competition with kindles, online amazon sales of books or supermarkets. I have resolved only to buy from here as long as I can afford it and the books get lent out or given to charity shops afterwards. Same with our local bakers, butchers and greengrocers. We used to have loads of these shops and now we just have one of each in our town.

    I can see our town being full of hairdressers, estate agents, charity shops and cafes in a few years time if people don't start using the local shops. Fine for those of us who can drive or use the internet but many elderly people cant. It might be a little more expensive but saves on fuel.
    Debt free and mortgage free and early retiree. Living the dream

    I'm a Board Guide on the Debt-Free Wannabe, Mortgages and Endowments, Banking and Budgeting boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Any views are mine and not the official line of moneysavingexpert.com. Pease remember, board guides don't read every post. If you spot an illegal or inappropriate post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 14th Aug 18, 8:06 PM
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    foxgloves
    Hi all,
    I was just patting myself on the back for having budgeted so well in advance for our imminent camping trip but before that, we now have to fit in a week in London. It's to deal with an ongoing family crisis & I haven't budgeted for this additional week away at all. Had a chat to mr f about it today & we think we'll be ok if we do low-key free stuff - we'll be hospital visiting for quite a lot of the time - & keep reminding ourselves that any additional expenditure will have to come from a pot of money destined for something else. Our resolve is now pretty strong. Hope I will be reporting back sensible frugal behaviour in a week or two!
    One worry about this extra trip has been picking our lovely supplies of hone grown fruit & veg so that it can be dealt with before we go & not wasted. Yesterday I picked the greengages & turned them into lots of little pots of compote for the freezer. Today I've made & frozen 4 portions of aubergine curry, 7 portions of Cranks tomato & lentil soup (we love this one) & 6 portions of pesto. More freezer tetris. Loads more courgettes to use but we will need to eat while we're away so I might pack a modest veg box to take with us. Anyway.....it's good to see all these meals stacking up in the freezer. They'll come in useful throughout Autumn, that's for sure & help keep grocery budget spends on track.
    Ok, time to enjoy a bit of a sprawl on the sofa with my book.
    Cheers all,
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 14th Aug 18, 8:15 PM
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    foxgloves
    Agree, Enthusiastic Saver......especially re butchers. Have had some great bargains (& service). Our local village butcher usually rounds the price down to the nearest £ & will cut a big joint down to make it the amount of money I'm looking to pay. Also a great source of those cheap tasty things like ham hocks, bacon bits, oxtail, ox cheek, etc. The other week, I asked for a lb of pork ribs & as it was nearing the end of the day, he gave me what was left on the tray for the same price. I've also had free beef bones in the past for making good stock, french onion soup, etc. As with all these small shops, if we don't use them, we lose them.....& we lose so much knowledge with them.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 15th Aug 18, 12:47 PM
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    • 23,997 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Afternoon Money Saving Pixies,
    Well, I got off to a right start this morning & I was only trying to be money saving!!! Bah!!! Here's what happened:
    I've got a sore ankle at the moment - it's achillles tendonitis. I've had it before & it rights itself in the end, but it does benefit from at least occasionally adopting the NHS advice of resting, icing, etc, etc. I no longer have a wheatie bag for putting in the freezer for these occasions. It developed a distinctly odd whiff, so I binned it. I have a bag of frozen sweetcorn but that's food & I didn't want to waste it. Ice packs are useless as they are hard, rectangular & won't 'sit' comfortably around the back of an ankle. I've used ice cubes wrapped in a tea towel, but they melt too quickly & drip all over the sofa. So I've been casting around for a non-spend, resourceful idea & first thing this morning, a great 'shopping from home' idea occurred to me!
    Some months ago, our beady door curtain in the conservatory broke. It had been mended loads of times, so I took it to bits & washed & dried all the thousands upon thousands of tiny glass beads. I couldn't think of anything to do with them, as I no longer make jewellery, etc, but they were glass & good quality so I poured them into a Qu*lity Street tin & stored them with my craft gear, in case I came across anyone who might use them.
    Fast forward to this morning when it occurred to me (& I hadn't even had any caffiene yet!) that if I poured the beads into a cotton pillowcase, tied it tightly & put it in the freezer, I'd have the perfect cold compress for my sore tendon. Leapt out of bed to pursue this stunner of an idea. Picked up the tin & headed onto the landing to fetch a clean pillow case from the linen cupboard.........& that's when the lid flew off, I dropped the tin & oh my days, you would not think beads could travel so far!! Well, mr f stood there offering really helpful advice like 'Why didn't you put the lid on' & 'We're going to be finding those for years' & I just lost it. I hurled the pillow case at him, kicked the beads even further & stood & swore like a docker until he decided it was probably best not to offer any more advice but to go downstairs & make me some toast & coffee. I'm one of those people who is placid & laid back up to a point, with oodles of patience, but when I 'blow', it's generally pretty spectacular. So after some caffiene, I tackled the beady deluge & recovered enough to go ahead with my 'free shopping from home' ice pack, which is currently in the freezer waiting to be tested out. I hoovered up the rest of the beads as I never want to see them again. I had to hoover 2 bedrooms, my little HQ room, the landing, stairs & linen cupboard. I think we truly will be finding the bloody things for months! Oh well, it was a good idea & I am looking forward to trying it out on my swollen tendon. If it works, then the hassle will have been worth it, if not....well, it was free, wasn't it? (Apart from the electricity used for all that damned hoovering......)
    Have subsequently calmed down & successfully done my mid-month budget check-in. No nasty surprises, though a need to be careful while we are away. I think we can do this as mr f is definitely on board with it & it's so much easier, isn't it, with all things budget-related, when both people are singing from the same hymn sheet?
    Hope everyone else got of to a better start than me - oh, & I should add that the entire tantrum was conducted while I was still stark naked! I'm surprised mr f didn't just fall about laughing!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £403
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