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  • FIRST POST
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
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    foxgloves
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse
    • #1
    • 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse 27th Feb 18 at 4:06 PM
    I've decided to start a diary to show that it's possible to change from a terrible money waster into a a bit of a budgeting ninja. OK, I'm not perfect....we all have slip-ups now & again....but I am proud that by my budget efforts & our surprising willingness to change from big silly spenders (we really were a pair of narnas!) to really quite sensible people, we managed to become debt-free. We paid off around 35k & really, just learned how to live differently And you know what? We really enjoy it! Turned out that all that spending & having to have stuff immediately didn't really make us happy. Who'd have thought it?
    Pre-LBM, my principles for money management were:
    1) Buy pretty much whatever I wanted when I wanted. Overdraft was seen as another word for 'more of my money'.
    2) Open bank statements, look at the balance through semi-closed eyes, carefully fold & replace in envelope & put in drawer.
    3) Tell myself bank balance is fine because it's only 3 weeks till pay-day.
    4) Always withdraw useful wodge of cash the week before pay-day just in case that pesky bank was planning to show me up in the supermarket by stopping my debit card.
    5) Never budget - why waste time on this when my own system worked so well?
    6) Tell myself not to worry about savings. They would be nice, but I 'didn't earn enough'
    That was about it, really. I didn't budget at all & made no effort to spend within my means. I lived outside my means from the age of 19 & didn't become debt-free till my 40s!
    The LBM was huge. I had it first & my partner showed initial signs of resistance, but when he saw my debts disappearing, he soon wanted in on the act & is now like a different person with money.
    Two years ago, we borrowed a modest sum to help us buy a car, We always knew this would happen & we made sure we saved up a good deposit. It was always our intention to re-pay the loan early & we did manage a nice overpayment of £2000 last year. However, our 2nd overpayment was almost ready to pay in when we had a string of expenses which we didn't want to put on credit cards, so we used our loan overpayment money to pay those. Last year was difficult in many ways & although we didn't return to our previous naughty spendiness, I think I started to lose some of my focus. Before Christmas, our Loan Pay Down Fund (LPDF) was down to just £60. Now it is already up to £421, really just from little savings, selling a few bits & bobs here & there. One thing I'm going to be really BIG on this year is 'Shopping from home', as in doing that first, to see if a spend can be avoided. I've got off to a really good start with that, starting with my new year de-cluttering & have found all sorts of useful stuff that will save me money further down the line. I also intend to do a full kitchen cupboard audit. Although I'm a DFW 'Small things' regular, I've never done a DFW diary before, so I'm going to use it to focus my efforts & get that LPDF up to £1000, then the next £1000, etc, asap. If you are the sort of person who gets excited about the contents of other people's cupboards & the satisfaction of saving a few quid here & there, then do join me for sharing ideas, laughs & moans, & I promise to throw in a few tales from my Spendy Decades - I have kept a journal for a lot of my adult life & I absolutely wince now, reading some of those diary entries about my cavalier attitude to money. I suppose they show that if I can change, anyone can! Oh well, onwards! I loved being debt-free & just a small amount of effort will mean that I can soon be again.
    F x
    Last edited by foxgloves; 27-02-2018 at 4:13 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
Page 10
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 22nd Apr 18, 5:51 PM
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    foxgloves
    Ooooh, it's so nice to see some warmer weather, isn't it? OK, this last weekend has been unseasonably hot, really, but even if it drops back a bit to what's normal for April, it will be lovely finally to have got out of that cold snap & into Spring.
    And Spring means savings on energy bills, which can only be a Good Thing. Our heating has been off since the beginning of April, though we did light the fire on a couple of evenings early on when it did seem to drop very cold. Our house has problems with condensation, so we have two dehumiifyers which we run when needed, but certainly every day in the colder months. Now we don't need them, as it's warm enough to open the windows. I like to have the patio door open too when the sun's shining, to give the house a good airing for free. Other savings - I have hardly used the heated airer this month - I've pegged out the laundry wherever possible to dry in the fresh air for free. Is it just me, or are there fewer creases in clothes which have had a good blow dry on the line? I'm sure I'm not imagining it. And when the weather is warmer, I don't want my bath water to be as hot, so another little saving too, over the summer months. I really would like to accumulate a nice bit of surplus on our energy account to take forward into next winter, & if there was sufficient to claim back a small refund too, for adding to the Loan Pay Down Fund, that would be even better. We've managed this before, but I know gas & electricity prices have risen since then.
    Hope everyone's seen some sunshine this weekend. I'm starting to catch up a little in the veggie garden now. I keep thinking of all that lovely fresh food I will be picking in the not too distant future as well as all the calories I'm burning off by clearing, digging & raking, so there'll be plenty more gardening activity in the week ahead, also plenty of admin,as I get prepared for my Big Budget Day on Friday. Oh, & Ziffit paid me for that small consignment of books & CDs I traded with them the other week......only a small one, around £9, but 'better than a slap in the belly with a wet cod' as my old granny used to say.
    Best Wishes for a great debt-busting week ahead.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • 1LuckyLady
    • By 1LuckyLady 22nd Apr 18, 9:23 PM
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    1LuckyLady
    Foxgloves, I definitely agree that washing dried on the line means far less creases. I love being able to get the clothes washed, line dried and away in the wardrobes within the day before the kids get home - it makes me smile
    Sticking with the "Small things" thread to keep up us on the straight and narrow.
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 23rd Apr 18, 4:06 PM
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    foxgloves
    Hi all,
    Oh, bloomin' ebay! It's a mixed blessing, isn't it?! I've made some good sales in the past, just little mostly small value items, but it does sometimes feel like a hassle, to end up with £1.50 or £2.00 on those tiny items. I don't list anything for less than £1.50 now, absolute minimum, as I factor in all the fiddling about & will not give my time for less than that.
    I've got quite a few items listed at the moment. Most of them are the usual decluttering sort of items, which tend to be low value & usually require re-listing a few times to get them sold. It surprises me how items in which there has been absolutely zero interest, even to the point of no or very low numbers of viewers, suddenly sell. This has happened overnight, as 2 items I listed for the final time, but were defo destined for the charity shop next time, have sold. I also awoke to an email from a potential buyer who has made an offer for multiple items. This has been quite fiddly, finding a box, weighing everything with packaging/padding, etc, to see if I think it's an acceptable deal or not. I've decided it is ok. I lose 49p on each item, but there haven't been any other bids & I've re-listed 3 times, so I am 'up' on the deal in terms of having a lump sum which I wouldn't otherwise get, plus another box of stuff is decluttered. Just waiting to see if this interest progresses into a sale.
    The best things we've sold on ebay have without doubt been plus-size clothes. A few years ago, I lost 6 stones & my partner lost 4, so as you can imagine, we had a lot of 'too big' clothes. I took some stuff in at the seams for a while, but I sold our better things & waas amazed at the level of interest. One of my coats sold for £36, another for £20, another for £10 and even the smaller things like skirts, jeans, tops, etc, sold. I think just 2 T-shirts failed to sell & went off to the charity shop. I even sold 5 bras!! I wouldn't ever have thought of buying a 2nd hand bra until I realised just how little some of these had been worn....just 2 or 3 times in some cases, & everyone seemed pleased with their purchases.
    As my weight drops (working hard on this!) from the 16 - 18 I am currently, to the 14 - 16 I aspire to be, I will probably have more garments to list, but for now, it's those smaller decluttered items we all have - books,magazines, CDs, etc. Yes, many of them are for small amounts (that's why I often favour Ziffit) as it cuts down the faffing around, but one thing us debt-busters know it that every little helps. Why wouldn't we turn stuff lying around at home into a few extra quid to chuck at the debt? That's what I'm doing, anyway. And as soon as our Paypal account reaches £50 again, it will be whipped across to the Loan Pay Down Fund asap. Here's to more unexpected overnight sales!
    My bullet diary is packed with this week's task lists.....many of them money-saving. I'm hoping for a good week, & wish the same for all debt-busters on here.
    We can sooooooo do it!
    F x
    Last edited by foxgloves; 23-04-2018 at 4:10 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 23rd Apr 18, 4:08 PM
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    foxgloves
    1LuckyLady - I do too! I don't manage it all within a day, as I only ever iron once a week (one of my worst jobs), but I do love the reduction in the weekly ironing pile from clothes getting a good blow outside, & of course, most of all, the fact that I've dried them for free, my favourite 4-letter word!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 24th Apr 18, 1:48 PM
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    foxgloves
    Hi all,
    Well all that faffing around with ebay yesterday was worth it in the end, as the potential buyer became an actual buyer. It took me a while to get a load of my auctions taken down to replace them with one lot containing multiple items, & I've made a bit less on each item, but on the plus side, I've sold all of them, which I don't think I would have done as individuals, as there had been very little interest. Also, as soon as I can get to the post office, I will have decluttered another box of stuff from our spare room. That's aside from the money, which I've already received & which will be heading for the LPDF as soon as our Paypal hits £50 again. Hopefully not too long, as several little payments have been trickling in.
    Great morning in the veggie garden, planting my lettuces out. There are 27 in total, from this first sowing, but I'm counting it as a dozen, as I shall probably lose 2 or 3 to slugs....though the worst 'pest' here by far is sparrows! I love that they live & nest around our house, as I know their numbers have declined such a lot since the 1970s, but oh my days, the damage they do to unguarded lettuces & beans with those naughty beaks!! Lettuces all netted & fastened down with old bricks. We eat a lot of salad all year round, so keeping a crop of lettuces going for as long as possible is a good money saver. I am going to sow just a pinch of seed every couple of weeks, then pot them up into modules & then I'll do my usual method, which is as soon as I cut one to eat, I plant out another baby one in its place. Red & white spring onions also sown last weekend, plus radishes, & I already have some lambs' lettuce left from my autumn sowing. Watercress sown too, so just a trough of rocket to do, & that should be a really good contribution to greenery for our salads this summer. There's basil in the greenhouse nearly ready to pot up, but it's a bit small as yet, so will leave it a few more days.
    Well, it's pouring with rain now, so no more garden jobs today. Next on the list is turning out the fridge. We have a zero food waste policy in our house & I know there are some things in there which require eating in tomorrow's packed lunch or freezing, so I had better get cracking. Then I'm going to mix up a sourdough loaf to bake tomorrow morning. As for spending? I may order my bicycle today. But that's not a 'spendy spend', as it is a gift. I have done lots of research & have hopefully chosen one which will last 20 years. Last time I chose a bike was at the beginning of the Spendy Decades. I chose it based on its colour & its pretty flowery design. From a practical point of view, it was the wrong size & style of bike for me - it looked lovely but I was very wobbly on it, despite regularly using it around the city centre - & when it was eventually sold, it was at a considerable loss, considering the price paid & its great condition.. Have learned from that & am being Mrs Sensible of Common Sense Non-Spendy Land with buying this new one!
    Hope all readers of my ramblings are ok, & not getting bogged down with life.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • joedenise
    • By joedenise 24th Apr 18, 2:53 PM
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    joedenise
    You've made me feel tired with all that gardening! I only grow a few herbs and that's enough for me. I'd rather sit in the garden with a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, reading a book, lol!

    Denise
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Apr 18, 5:33 PM
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    • 20,699 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Hi Debt-busters,
    Well, I've had 'Budgetitis' today. mr f is on leave & we did our grocery shopping this morning & enjoyed a (free!) coffee together in our favourite indie coffee shop, then it was home for my Big Budget Day. I'd been raring to go this month. Do you find that as the month progresses, you are just waiting for pay-day to juggle with your different funds to see what can be paid off? Well, that was me all morning, then when I got home & tried to sign on, our online banking was down. Aaaaaagh!! (not TSB, another bank!) Tried again about 5 times, same message, so I did all the peripheral admin jobs until finally it was back online & I could get going.
    I knew this month would be quite challenging. We had a £100 plumber bill to pay (or rather, to pay back the Holiday Piggy, which is where I borrowed the cash from), plus a one-off annual bill & together with a few smaller additional payments, I soon saw that I would have to jiggle things around & prioritise.
    Yes, I know my old pre-LBM solution would be to make minimum payments on credit cards, but I am no longer that person.....we really only use cards for planned purchases to maximise points for vouchers....so I did my usual thing now of getting an A4 sheet of paper & writing balance after bills at the top, then a list of all the other payments where there is wriggle room....either things that can be cut altogether or reduced. Having a budget in place doesn't mean there's no flexibility. If there's no room to be a little bit flexible, I think that could actually be a door back into low-level debt. After trying a few options through, I found I could do a perfectly workable budget by slightly altering when we start June's grocery budget (it just means making May's last for 1 extra day!), by cancelling our fresh fish box this month (a shame, but I don't like the safety-cushion in our bank account to dip too low - I think of it as our budget 'armbands!) & by not paying into 2 of our Savings Piggies. I've prioritised the 4 which I would be least happy to leave 'unpaid'. Just these few tweaks leave sufficient to pay our other CC in full when the bill arrives, my usual monthly level of 'safety cushion, re-pay back the plumber money to our Holiday Piggy, all bills as normal & to leave our grocery budget & personal spends untouched.
    I think it's easier to see solutions when you actually have a budget in place. You can't make changes & tweaks unless there's something tangible to alter, but seeing it all written down somehow helps you to see what adjustments can be done when necessary to make things work within the funds available. Because that's the key, isn't it. OUR money is what comes in every month. There isn't any more. Any extra, unless its from savings, is straying into use of someone else's money, & those 'someones' are going to need paying back. Such a simple thing which I wish I'd cared to grasp decades ago!!
    Anyway, another month's budget done......I don't want to sound as though I'm moaning about the plumber - he did a job which really needed doing, as it was causing damage elsewhere, & I didn't need to dip into our emergency fund this time, which was a bonus. After all the tweaking, I was surprised to see I was still able to make a little payment to the Loan Pay Down Fund - Just £40, plus a little extra from selling some of my home made preserves, but ANYTHING which goes into that fund brings the day closer when that last bit of loan has gone.
    Anyone out there who is at or nearing pay-day....good luck with the number-crunching. We can do it!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • wishingthemortgaheaway
    • By wishingthemortgaheaway 27th Apr 18, 5:53 PM
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    wishingthemortgaheaway
    Sounds like a good plan foxgloves. I absolutely believe that once you have something on paper it's much easier to juggle. So do something first, then iron out the wrinkles.

    I also love budget day.
    The 100 payment countdown (each payment = £400) 2018 Starts at 13/100 o/s £34,750.
    Jan 18 14/100 Feb 15/100 March 18/100 April 19/100
    Term Mortgage free date: October 2029 Current mortgage free date: April 2025 March 2024 Jan 2024
    MFW 2018 Challenge Member #162 £1600ish/£2,500
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Apr 18, 9:11 PM
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    foxgloves
    Dead right, Wish.
    My budgeting system is now well & truly established. It took a couple of tries to get something sustainable that I could work with, but now, the way I do it works. I think that's one of the reasons I now like budget day. It"s proof I can do it & when it's all done & set up for the month ahead, I feel in control.
    F
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 29th Apr 18, 9:00 PM
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    foxgloves
    Well now, I think I can feel a good money saving week coming on. I'd like it to be an awesome one. Task list already under construction. Come on debt-slayers, let's see what we can achieve!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 3rd May 18, 1:00 PM
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    • 29,989 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    Found you!

    Just spent the past hour or so reading through your diary and nodding at the familiarity of the spendy days. I just wish that I had even a tenth of your motivation for meal planning and batch cooking. I wish I didn't hate cooking as much as I do, and I wish my kids weren't as fussy as they are.

    I have subscribed, and you're not getting rid of me.
    DFD 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 3rd May 18, 5:55 PM
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    foxgloves
    Lol, CCL. Yes, I used to be a silly spendy girl! It does help that I love cooking, baking & growing stuff to eat. Of course I have more time for all that since my redundancy, but we still cooked from scratch most nights when we both worked full time with a 40 & 52 mile round trip commute. Shame we didn't also have a budget, meal plans or a sensible shopping list back then too, as we might have been a whole lot better off! Slow cookers are great on long busy days. Might be worth a try x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 7th May 18, 5:13 PM
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    foxgloves
    Hello Bank Holiday Money Savers,
    And you know what? I have saved money today because we haven't been out. We always used to have a long day trip somewhere nice on Bank Holidays, but in later years, well, there's the spendiness it usually entailed, as well as increasingly, a lot of sitting in the car in non-moving traffic. I've kind of come to the conclusion that if I want to sit in a hot car, going nowhere, dying for a wee, I might as well just park on my own drive for 3 hours!
    Back in the Spendy Decades, I did used to get through a fair bit of cashola on Bank Holidays.....you know.....stopping off for a coffee & snack, lunch out, sometimes where we were going would involve entry fees/parking, etc, then buying things, as I love gift shops....though less so these days when I am much more able to stand back & consider how much of this not-very-competitively-priced-loveliness I would actually use. While we would often take a picnic, it would tend to involve lots of tasty little wot-nots from the deli, rather than going more the home-made route. Then, after getting back home, having usually met with the inevitable traffic on the way, what would we do 'just to round off the weekend?' Yes, you've guessed it! Phone out for a takeaway, & add another £25 or so to our day's outgoings. Well, we still like to go out & we still like a treat, but we've decided to have our day trip next weekend, to take a really nice picnic we've made ourselves plus a big flask of coffee.
    Today, we've been polishing our money saving halos. mr f took some of my home baked cobs out of the freezer last night & made bacon cobs for breakfast with a big cafetiere of coffee. We then cleaned all the conservatory glass, inside & out, & he cleared its gutters & washed the roof, while I cleaned all the furniture. We worked so hard that I hit my daily fitbit target without even going for a walk, so free fitness too! Then we divided labours.....mr f to cutting back naughty pyracantha which was trying to come indoors & me upstairs with the laptop to see if I could sell any more of our decluttered CDs/books to Ziffit......with their bank holiday 15% code, I soon had a small box full which will be another almost £9 to the Loan Pay Down Fund.
    Felt like a little snackette - started thinking about ice creams.....but then remembered we'd taken a few of my little mini-muffins out of the freezer in case temptation struck, so that was the corner shop dodged again.
    Finally......the Great Bank Holiday-Take-away-Temptation (you would not believe how much curry mr f can eat......). Nope! Dodged it. Have put Spanish Beef in the slow cooker this morning, while resolve was still strong. It's starting to smell very nice - think it's the chorizo & smoked paprika. There will be no take-away purchased here this evening. Only slight wobble is that I don't think there's any beer in, but he might well decide to forgo it, as beer that isn't bought as part of grocery shopping ( no more than a couple of bottles a week max) has to come out of his Personal Spends cash......(as mine would, if I fancied a nice bottle of Bombay Sapphire!) so I think it's going to be a total NSD.
    Hope everyone's enjoying the sunshine.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • 1LuckyLady
    • By 1LuckyLady 7th May 18, 8:53 PM
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    1LuckyLady
    Sounds like a great day Foxgloves and I'm sure you'll have a lovely day out next week too.
    Sticking with the "Small things" thread to keep up us on the straight and narrow.
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 7th May 18, 9:56 PM
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    crazy_cat_lady
    Fantastic day - although I don't think that I'd ever be tempted to do that level of cleaning.
    DFD 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 8th May 18, 7:35 AM
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    foxgloves
    Well? I'd be the first to admit I'm not a lover of cleaning, but it's once a year for the conservatory at that level, so feels worth the effort. It looks lovely this morning with the sun streaming in the clean glass. Just got to put up replacement fairy lights as our ancient set we were given 2nd hand finally carked it. We've bought an inexpensive solar set, so as to cut down electricity use, not that I imagine they use much. I think sometimes that a good declutter is nearly as good as a thorough cleaning session & it certainly makes cleaning easier not having bits of stuff everywhere.
    Anyway.....am off to peg out my cheap overnight laundry to make the most of this free line-drying weather x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 8th May 18, 3:40 PM
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    foxgloves
    Afternoon Debt-busters,
    Decided to wear my new jeans for the first time today. Really pleased with them. They kind of only cost me £4. Well, only because £35 of the total cost was money I received for my birthday & £10 was a money-off voucher emailed to me by the store, so I just kicked in £4 from the Clothing Piggy & that was it.....job done. New jeans, & a size smaller than I expected to be able to heft myself into as well.
    I'll try not to make this turn into another 'debtisode', but this made me think back to how much money I used to waste on clothes back in the Spendy Decades. This certainly wasn't because I liked designer brands - to be honest, I've always thought people who spend £100s & £100s on a single garment because of the name on the label must have more money than sense. No, a lot of the money I wasted on clothes was on stuff bought from that shocking drainer of bank balances - the 'sale rail'. Don't get me wrong, I know there are occasionally some fab bargains to be had by rummaging through, as well as some deeply annoying moments, when you see the dress you paid full price for is now half price, so I do often still look. What I no longer do, however, is convince myself something is such a totally ace bargain that I just have to buy it. Basically, if I don't like whatever it is enough for it to have caught my eye at full price, then it's probably not going to be a particularly good buy. I suppose it comes back to that old truism about 'a bargain only being a bargain if you needed it in the first place'.
    Back in the Spendy Decades, I was drawn to those sale rails as if there were magnets in my feet. "Bargains!!!!" - the word would sound in my head & I'd be rummaging through everything, trying stuff on, & would generally end up buying something primarily because a) it was £20 off and b) it fitted. I can remember only too well how so many of these 'bargains', all considered amazing at the time, turned out to be rather un-special once I'd had them a few weeks. They were usually not quite right, or I'd been so swayed by the price reduction, I hadn't considered if I actually had anything at home that would go with them. I would also let the sale price tempt me into buying things in colours I wasn't all that fussed about - I can remember the most utterly hideous mint green dress - it was only when it finally dawned on me I wouldn't even willingly buy a tablecloth in that colour that it went off to the charity shop! Years after that, I was still doing it......a nice thick jersey dress, just below the knee, great style with chunky tights & boots, so I bought it......but it was navy blue. I never EVER wear navy blue, but again, that reduced price ticket had obviously got into that bit of my brain which processes unsuitable clothing purchases as fabulous bargains!
    Anyway, you'll be pleased to know there has been a change of approach in more recent years. Much as I do like a bargain, it's only a genuine one if it's something I utterly love. I would honestly rather pay full price for a garment that I know I will enjoy wearing & looking good in, even though it means buying far fewer new clothes. And I have also embraced charity shops. Same process applies though.....it might be a good 'brand', it might only be a fiver, but if it isn't a truly positive addition to my wardrobe, then it stays in the shop for another treasure hunter to find. "it's OK" & "I quite like it" or "I'd prefer it if it was in black, but this'll do" are no longer enough to get me to part with my cash! And thank goodness for that, as I do still enjoy going in for a rummage at sale time!
    Anyone else picked up some terrible clothing 'bargains' at sale time?
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
    • Sayschezza
    • By Sayschezza 8th May 18, 6:28 PM
    • 255 Posts
    • 2,333 Thanks
    Sayschezza
    This hit a guilty spot. I am dreadful for wasting money on bargains which end up in the cs. I also work in a cs for a few hours per week and am known as one of the best customers. I should know better at my age.
    • Bluegreen143
    • By Bluegreen143 9th May 18, 7:20 AM
    • 1,098 Posts
    • 12,661 Thanks
    Bluegreen143
    Just read your whole diary and find it so inspiring love your “debtisodes” and how much you achieve cooking and gardening-wise.

    I do cook from scratch but am finding baking bread etc regularly, which I always did beford, is too hard to fit in often at the moment as I’ve got a two-year-old - but then he does enjoy baking so I really should do more. We have a lovely garden though we really are amateurs, so I’ll be following for tips!

    I did try Ziffit once for books but got annoyed at how hard it was to get a box together as they didn’t want many of my titles. Must remember to try them again as I didn’t realise what they pay for changes.
    Married 1 March 2014 DS born 06/12/15

    Debts
    CC - £2,182.17/£2,182.17
    Family loan 1 - £1,680/£1,680
    Family loan 2 - £3,500/£5,000
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 9th May 18, 8:19 PM
    • 4,022 Posts
    • 20,699 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Sayschezza - years ago, there was a woman who lived locally to me.....I didn't know her personally, but often used to see her out & about - I'd say she'd have probably have been in her early 60s. Anyway, I always used to think she looked so stylish. She dressed really creatively, often ankle length fitted dresses, lovely unusual accessories & bags, nice boots, etc. Anyway, I popped into a charity shop one afternoon for a browse & she was working in there. We got chatting & she said "I buy all my clothes in here!" Of course I was still very spendy back then, but she really was a shining example of how to put together a creative wardrobe on a budget!
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £714-70
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £244
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