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  • FIRST POST
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
    • 4,280Posts
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    foxgloves
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse
    • #1
    • 27th Feb 18, 4:06 PM
    Put away your purse & become debt-averse 27th Feb 18 at 4:06 PM
    I've decided to start a diary to show that it's possible to change from a terrible money waster into a a bit of a budgeting ninja. OK, I'm not perfect....we all have slip-ups now & again....but I am proud that by my budget efforts & our surprising willingness to change from big silly spenders (we really were a pair of narnas!) to really quite sensible people, we managed to become debt-free. We paid off around 35k & really, just learned how to live differently And you know what? We really enjoy it! Turned out that all that spending & having to have stuff immediately didn't really make us happy. Who'd have thought it?
    Pre-LBM, my principles for money management were:
    1) Buy pretty much whatever I wanted when I wanted. Overdraft was seen as another word for 'more of my money'.
    2) Open bank statements, look at the balance through semi-closed eyes, carefully fold & replace in envelope & put in drawer.
    3) Tell myself bank balance is fine because it's only 3 weeks till pay-day.
    4) Always withdraw useful wodge of cash the week before pay-day just in case that pesky bank was planning to show me up in the supermarket by stopping my debit card.
    5) Never budget - why waste time on this when my own system worked so well?
    6) Tell myself not to worry about savings. They would be nice, but I 'didn't earn enough'
    That was about it, really. I didn't budget at all & made no effort to spend within my means. I lived outside my means from the age of 19 & didn't become debt-free till my 40s!
    The LBM was huge. I had it first & my partner showed initial signs of resistance, but when he saw my debts disappearing, he soon wanted in on the act & is now like a different person with money.
    Two years ago, we borrowed a modest sum to help us buy a car, We always knew this would happen & we made sure we saved up a good deposit. It was always our intention to re-pay the loan early & we did manage a nice overpayment of £2000 last year. However, our 2nd overpayment was almost ready to pay in when we had a string of expenses which we didn't want to put on credit cards, so we used our loan overpayment money to pay those. Last year was difficult in many ways & although we didn't return to our previous naughty spendiness, I think I started to lose some of my focus. Before Christmas, our Loan Pay Down Fund (LPDF) was down to just £60. Now it is already up to £421, really just from little savings, selling a few bits & bobs here & there. One thing I'm going to be really BIG on this year is 'Shopping from home', as in doing that first, to see if a spend can be avoided. I've got off to a really good start with that, starting with my new year de-cluttering & have found all sorts of useful stuff that will save me money further down the line. I also intend to do a full kitchen cupboard audit. Although I'm a DFW 'Small things' regular, I've never done a DFW diary before, so I'm going to use it to focus my efforts & get that LPDF up to £1000, then the next £1000, etc, asap. If you are the sort of person who gets excited about the contents of other people's cupboards & the satisfaction of saving a few quid here & there, then do join me for sharing ideas, laughs & moans, & I promise to throw in a few tales from my Spendy Decades - I have kept a journal for a lot of my adult life & I absolutely wince now, reading some of those diary entries about my cavalier attitude to money. I suppose they show that if I can change, anyone can! Oh well, onwards! I loved being debt-free & just a small amount of effort will mean that I can soon be again.
    F x
    Last edited by foxgloves; 27-02-2018 at 4:13 PM.
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
Page 10
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 27th Apr 18, 9:11 PM
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    foxgloves
    Dead right, Wish.
    My budgeting system is now well & truly established. It took a couple of tries to get something sustainable that I could work with, but now, the way I do it works. I think that's one of the reasons I now like budget day. It"s proof I can do it & when it's all done & set up for the month ahead, I feel in control.
    F
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 29th Apr 18, 9:00 PM
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    foxgloves
    Well now, I think I can feel a good money saving week coming on. I'd like it to be an awesome one. Task list already under construction. Come on debt-slayers, let's see what we can achieve!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 3rd May 18, 1:00 PM
    • 3,892 Posts
    • 33,329 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    Found you!

    Just spent the past hour or so reading through your diary and nodding at the familiarity of the spendy days. I just wish that I had even a tenth of your motivation for meal planning and batch cooking. I wish I didn't hate cooking as much as I do, and I wish my kids weren't as fussy as they are.

    I have subscribed, and you're not getting rid of me.
    Sunshine September #12 NSD 11 1 debt vs 100 days £262.01/£1685
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 3rd May 18, 5:55 PM
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    foxgloves
    Lol, CCL. Yes, I used to be a silly spendy girl! It does help that I love cooking, baking & growing stuff to eat. Of course I have more time for all that since my redundancy, but we still cooked from scratch most nights when we both worked full time with a 40 & 52 mile round trip commute. Shame we didn't also have a budget, meal plans or a sensible shopping list back then too, as we might have been a whole lot better off! Slow cookers are great on long busy days. Might be worth a try x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 7th May 18, 5:13 PM
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    foxgloves
    Hello Bank Holiday Money Savers,
    And you know what? I have saved money today because we haven't been out. We always used to have a long day trip somewhere nice on Bank Holidays, but in later years, well, there's the spendiness it usually entailed, as well as increasingly, a lot of sitting in the car in non-moving traffic. I've kind of come to the conclusion that if I want to sit in a hot car, going nowhere, dying for a wee, I might as well just park on my own drive for 3 hours!
    Back in the Spendy Decades, I did used to get through a fair bit of cashola on Bank Holidays.....you know.....stopping off for a coffee & snack, lunch out, sometimes where we were going would involve entry fees/parking, etc, then buying things, as I love gift shops....though less so these days when I am much more able to stand back & consider how much of this not-very-competitively-priced-loveliness I would actually use. While we would often take a picnic, it would tend to involve lots of tasty little wot-nots from the deli, rather than going more the home-made route. Then, after getting back home, having usually met with the inevitable traffic on the way, what would we do 'just to round off the weekend?' Yes, you've guessed it! Phone out for a takeaway, & add another £25 or so to our day's outgoings. Well, we still like to go out & we still like a treat, but we've decided to have our day trip next weekend, to take a really nice picnic we've made ourselves plus a big flask of coffee.
    Today, we've been polishing our money saving halos. mr f took some of my home baked cobs out of the freezer last night & made bacon cobs for breakfast with a big cafetiere of coffee. We then cleaned all the conservatory glass, inside & out, & he cleared its gutters & washed the roof, while I cleaned all the furniture. We worked so hard that I hit my daily fitbit target without even going for a walk, so free fitness too! Then we divided labours.....mr f to cutting back naughty pyracantha which was trying to come indoors & me upstairs with the laptop to see if I could sell any more of our decluttered CDs/books to Ziffit......with their bank holiday 15% code, I soon had a small box full which will be another almost £9 to the Loan Pay Down Fund.
    Felt like a little snackette - started thinking about ice creams.....but then remembered we'd taken a few of my little mini-muffins out of the freezer in case temptation struck, so that was the corner shop dodged again.
    Finally......the Great Bank Holiday-Take-away-Temptation (you would not believe how much curry mr f can eat......). Nope! Dodged it. Have put Spanish Beef in the slow cooker this morning, while resolve was still strong. It's starting to smell very nice - think it's the chorizo & smoked paprika. There will be no take-away purchased here this evening. Only slight wobble is that I don't think there's any beer in, but he might well decide to forgo it, as beer that isn't bought as part of grocery shopping ( no more than a couple of bottles a week max) has to come out of his Personal Spends cash......(as mine would, if I fancied a nice bottle of Bombay Sapphire!) so I think it's going to be a total NSD.
    Hope everyone's enjoying the sunshine.
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 7th May 18, 9:56 PM
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    crazy_cat_lady
    Fantastic day - although I don't think that I'd ever be tempted to do that level of cleaning.
    Sunshine September #12 NSD 11 1 debt vs 100 days £262.01/£1685
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 8th May 18, 7:35 AM
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    foxgloves
    Well? I'd be the first to admit I'm not a lover of cleaning, but it's once a year for the conservatory at that level, so feels worth the effort. It looks lovely this morning with the sun streaming in the clean glass. Just got to put up replacement fairy lights as our ancient set we were given 2nd hand finally carked it. We've bought an inexpensive solar set, so as to cut down electricity use, not that I imagine they use much. I think sometimes that a good declutter is nearly as good as a thorough cleaning session & it certainly makes cleaning easier not having bits of stuff everywhere.
    Anyway.....am off to peg out my cheap overnight laundry to make the most of this free line-drying weather x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 8th May 18, 3:40 PM
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    foxgloves
    Afternoon Debt-busters,
    Decided to wear my new jeans for the first time today. Really pleased with them. They kind of only cost me £4. Well, only because £35 of the total cost was money I received for my birthday & £10 was a money-off voucher emailed to me by the store, so I just kicked in £4 from the Clothing Piggy & that was it.....job done. New jeans, & a size smaller than I expected to be able to heft myself into as well.
    I'll try not to make this turn into another 'debtisode', but this made me think back to how much money I used to waste on clothes back in the Spendy Decades. This certainly wasn't because I liked designer brands - to be honest, I've always thought people who spend £100s & £100s on a single garment because of the name on the label must have more money than sense. No, a lot of the money I wasted on clothes was on stuff bought from that shocking drainer of bank balances - the 'sale rail'. Don't get me wrong, I know there are occasionally some fab bargains to be had by rummaging through, as well as some deeply annoying moments, when you see the dress you paid full price for is now half price, so I do often still look. What I no longer do, however, is convince myself something is such a totally ace bargain that I just have to buy it. Basically, if I don't like whatever it is enough for it to have caught my eye at full price, then it's probably not going to be a particularly good buy. I suppose it comes back to that old truism about 'a bargain only being a bargain if you needed it in the first place'.
    Back in the Spendy Decades, I was drawn to those sale rails as if there were magnets in my feet. "Bargains!!!!" - the word would sound in my head & I'd be rummaging through everything, trying stuff on, & would generally end up buying something primarily because a) it was £20 off and b) it fitted. I can remember only too well how so many of these 'bargains', all considered amazing at the time, turned out to be rather un-special once I'd had them a few weeks. They were usually not quite right, or I'd been so swayed by the price reduction, I hadn't considered if I actually had anything at home that would go with them. I would also let the sale price tempt me into buying things in colours I wasn't all that fussed about - I can remember the most utterly hideous mint green dress - it was only when it finally dawned on me I wouldn't even willingly buy a tablecloth in that colour that it went off to the charity shop! Years after that, I was still doing it......a nice thick jersey dress, just below the knee, great style with chunky tights & boots, so I bought it......but it was navy blue. I never EVER wear navy blue, but again, that reduced price ticket had obviously got into that bit of my brain which processes unsuitable clothing purchases as fabulous bargains!
    Anyway, you'll be pleased to know there has been a change of approach in more recent years. Much as I do like a bargain, it's only a genuine one if it's something I utterly love. I would honestly rather pay full price for a garment that I know I will enjoy wearing & looking good in, even though it means buying far fewer new clothes. And I have also embraced charity shops. Same process applies though.....it might be a good 'brand', it might only be a fiver, but if it isn't a truly positive addition to my wardrobe, then it stays in the shop for another treasure hunter to find. "it's OK" & "I quite like it" or "I'd prefer it if it was in black, but this'll do" are no longer enough to get me to part with my cash! And thank goodness for that, as I do still enjoy going in for a rummage at sale time!
    Anyone else picked up some terrible clothing 'bargains' at sale time?
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • Sayschezza
    • By Sayschezza 8th May 18, 6:28 PM
    • 307 Posts
    • 2,750 Thanks
    Sayschezza
    This hit a guilty spot. I am dreadful for wasting money on bargains which end up in the cs. I also work in a cs for a few hours per week and am known as one of the best customers. I should know better at my age.
    • Bluegreen143
    • By Bluegreen143 9th May 18, 7:20 AM
    • 1,101 Posts
    • 12,667 Thanks
    Bluegreen143
    Just read your whole diary and find it so inspiring love your ďdebtisodesĒ and how much you achieve cooking and gardening-wise.

    I do cook from scratch but am finding baking bread etc regularly, which I always did beford, is too hard to fit in often at the moment as Iíve got a two-year-old - but then he does enjoy baking so I really should do more. We have a lovely garden though we really are amateurs, so Iíll be following for tips!

    I did try Ziffit once for books but got annoyed at how hard it was to get a box together as they didnít want many of my titles. Must remember to try them again as I didnít realise what they pay for changes.
    Married 1 March 2014 DS born 06/12/15

    Debts
    CC - £2,182.17/£2,182.17
    Family loan 1 - £1,680/£1,680
    Family loan 2 - £3,500/£5,000
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 9th May 18, 8:19 PM
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    foxgloves
    Sayschezza - years ago, there was a woman who lived locally to me.....I didn't know her personally, but often used to see her out & about - I'd say she'd have probably have been in her early 60s. Anyway, I always used to think she looked so stylish. She dressed really creatively, often ankle length fitted dresses, lovely unusual accessories & bags, nice boots, etc. Anyway, I popped into a charity shop one afternoon for a browse & she was working in there. We got chatting & she said "I buy all my clothes in here!" Of course I was still very spendy back then, but she really was a shining example of how to put together a creative wardrobe on a budget!
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 9th May 18, 8:35 PM
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    foxgloves
    Bluegreen143 - I've always enjoyed cooking, baking & gardening, even back when I was very spendy. I make most of our bread - I usually bake a batch of half white/half wholemeal rolls each week (good for packed lunches, burgers, picnics, etc) plus a wholemeal loaf & a white sourdough loaf, depending on how much bread we're getting through.
    Re Ziffit - Yes, I was surprised at how their offers change. For example, I've just tried a whole load of CDs which have been tried on 3 previous occasions (no interest), & found about 8 of them were now wanted & one of them had moved from being a 'No' to an offer of £1.01. I think their system must run on some kind of algorithm in that if they 'see' a barcode being offered a lot, then that's going to be a very common item, worth very little. I also sold them 2 books.....one had been refused before & the other had moved from me being offered 12p (hahahaha) to an amount I was prepared to sell at. But generally, we've found that the more popular something is, the less chance there is of them buying it. mr f has been decluttering his vast DVD collection & gave me a pile of those to try. No interest in any of them, even though some were 'limited edition' or classic films. I think from a business point of view, the scarcer stuff is going to be what sells. There must be 100s of 1000s upon 1000s of the big blockbuster movies & fiction paperbacks around, which makes them pretty much worthless. My best offers have been almost £6 for an art book and also a good price on a couple of music scores - I used to sing, & had been decluttering some of my music - mr f also got a decent price for an X-box game - can't comment further on that as it's not my thing & all the games look the same to me!
    Anyway, I've traded several boxes with them over the past year....not a huge amount at a time, between £8.50 & £24 per box, but when it comes to this loan-paying-off mullarkey, we all know that every little helps!
    So if you decide to have another go, I hope you have some successful sales!
    F
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • wishingthemortgaheaway
    • By wishingthemortgaheaway 9th May 18, 9:30 PM
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    wishingthemortgaheaway
    I've used ziffit a couple of times, good earners for me were out of date uni text books (I did a technology degree, so technology has moved on) and teacher resource books from the old national curriculum. (My degree is not one that would automatically lead anyone into teaching).

    Need to have another hunt through.
    The 100 payment countdown (each payment = £400) 2018 Starts at 13/100 o/s £34,750.
    Jan 18 14/100 Feb 15/100 March 18/100 April 19/100 May 20/100 June 21/100
    Term Mortgage free date: October 2029 Current mortgage free date: April 2025 March 2024 Jan 2024
    MFW 2018 Challenge Member #162 £1600ish/£2,500
    • Bluegreen143
    • By Bluegreen143 11th May 18, 7:17 AM
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    • 12,667 Thanks
    Bluegreen143
    Thanks foxgloves, will definitely give it a go again as I have so many bookcases groaning with books and am basically a bit of a hoarder of them would be great to make a little bit and clear some space too. No CDs or DVDs here, we are digital/streaming only. Decluttered then years and years ago but sadly before Ziffit and when I was well off so they all went to the charity shop.
    Married 1 March 2014 DS born 06/12/15

    Debts
    CC - £2,182.17/£2,182.17
    Family loan 1 - £1,680/£1,680
    Family loan 2 - £3,500/£5,000
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 13th May 18, 5:26 PM
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    foxgloves
    Bluegreen143 - It's defo worth a try! Every little helps & decluttering always feels good.

    Well, I've felt things sliding a little this week.....not due to a loss of money saving resolve on my part, but because life has rather got in the way of my usual budget monitoring. I've just synchronised my diary for the week ahead with mr f's diary, as it's always a good start to the week if we're both singing from the same page! I've also written myself a humungous job list for tomorrow so that I can catch up & resume my preferred level of organisation & control.
    Getting our Loan Pay Down Fund increased is absolutely key, so I will be prioritising financial tasks.
    Ok Debtbusters.....anyone else up for trying for a really good week? I can't bear letting my usual high level of organisation slip, so I'm definitely in!!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • Redrose
    • By Redrose 13th May 18, 7:44 PM
    • 145 Posts
    • 137 Thanks
    Redrose
    Hello
    Hi I have just read your complete thread

    I can tottaly understand about your flickering light blub....... mine as been like this for about 2 months, thinking I must sort out my monies, and try to cut back on wasting so much ( yes I know I do it ) but as you said in one of your posts "its nearly payday"...... I think I have had a little wake up call last week ( I get a balance text every Sunday from my back ) and it said £60 something pound "WHAT" OMG I only got paid the week before..... as luck as had it, I have a small savings account to transfer money over, just to make sure bills get paid etc.....

    Well done on your budgting, your batch cooking and your will power to bring down your debts........ can i ask a question, you say you have "pots" of money that you have budgeted for, are these actual pots that you put cash in...

    Thanks and good luck
    Going start looking after the pennies, and the pounds will take care of them selves
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 13th May 18, 9:07 PM
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    foxgloves
    OK, 1LuckyLady, let's go for it! This time next week, let's say that we'll both be feeling more in control. I actually started feeling better about stuff as soon as I'd written my list!
    F x
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 13th May 18, 9:27 PM
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    • 22,543 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Hi Redrose,
    Yes, when I set our budget each month, I allow for the mortgage & all our regular bills which go out of the account by direct debit.
    Then I sort out all the different 'pots'. The first ones are groceries, travel & personal spends. I leave our grocery budget in the account (about £200 per month) & keep a tracker sheet in my bullet diary to log our grocery spending. Travel is for my partner's work. He gets it back with his expenses but needs money for parking, etc, so I give him that as £30 cash. Personal Spends pot is sort of our 'pocket money'. It's usually £60 cash each to spend on whatever we like, but once it's gone, tough!
    Then I operate 6 different 'Savings Piggies'. These are just envelopes. I withdraw the cash & pay it in each month on budget day. Our 6 Savings Piggies are Car Maintenance, Clothes, Leisure/Entertainment, Presents, Holiday & Household Maintenance. The amount I pay in each month depends on plans, how much is in there already, how much surplus money in the budget, etc. My target is £200 split between the 6 categories, but this does vary.
    I also run temporary 'pots' occasionally for specific items - i.e my partner has a big birthday coming up & so I am saving for his present because I don't want to put it on a credit card or use money from our emergency fund to pay for it.
    Hope this helps to answer your question.
    Hopefully those 'lightbulb flickers" will turn into a great big beam & you will get to embrace budgeting too! I honestly wouldn't go back to being that naughty spender even if I suddenly had a big increase in income.
    Best of luck with it,
    F
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
    • crazy_cat_lady
    • By crazy_cat_lady 13th May 18, 9:41 PM
    • 3,892 Posts
    • 33,329 Thanks
    crazy_cat_lady
    I'm in Foxgloves - I have to be. There's still half a month left of my solo budget and month 1 has been difficult to be honest.
    Sunshine September #12 NSD 11 1 debt vs 100 days £262.01/£1685
    DFD #1: 6 Nov 15 - paid £28,447
    • foxgloves
    • By foxgloves 13th May 18, 10:17 PM
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    • 22,543 Thanks
    foxgloves
    Ok, CCL. We're going to kick some serious bottom with our good moneysaving ways this week. I think it's inevitable that you'll need a bit of a period of adjustment with your solo budget, but you'll get there. I'm convinced most of it comes down to planning. I looked at my admin basket earlier & it's all spilling out & there's a ball of yarn, a some pants & a stray cat biscuit on top of it, but tomorrow it will be pristene, everything dealt with & filed away. I am feeling like Mrs Motivated. I think I'm actually going to get ready for bed now, so tomorrow will cone quicker & I can crack on with my massive list.
    Have a good week, CCL & 1LL. We can do this! Us three - 10. Wimpy lists - nil !
    F xx
    Money can't jump out of your purse on its own so ask 'Can I borrow one, make one, grow one, bake one, re-purpose or recycle, acquire it for free?' Yes? Then put that purse away & keep your money because little savings grow!
    Loan pay-down fund instalment 2 = £470-01
    Payment received from surveys: 2015 = £320 2016 = £210 2017 = £304 2018 = £338
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