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  • FIRST POST
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 13th Feb 18, 4:42 PM
    • 202Posts
    • 752Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    "Looking for a PV and EV solution"
    • #1
    • 13th Feb 18, 4:42 PM
    "Looking for a PV and EV solution" 13th Feb 18 at 4:42 PM
    I've an ageing deisel powered Ford Focus(ten years 75k miles) which has been brilliant but am thinking to replace it. Looking ahead Electric(second hand) seems a possible choice especially as we have two vehicles, so can use the other for long distances. We are retired with a mix of local journeys for school run etc and longer distances for holidays etc. I'm also keen on the idea of being self sufficient in generating electricity and considering combining the two. Our bungalow has roof of some 50 sq metres with a 22 degree pitch and being 20 degrees east of south facing. I'm thinking of filling the entire roof with panels in order to generate the max I can. On a good day in summer it could return circa 35kwh so I don't see a problem in supplying household needs(7kwh/day) and keeping the EV topped up. Am seeking quotations for systems of 4k only and the max that can be acheived also. Presumably I'd still get the FIT and export returns on the larger system so it would appear to me to be a sound financial investment. Battery storage is also an option but at current prices of 1000/kwh I'm not convinced of a sensible return. I note there is also a subsidy for installing a charging point. Would this be sensible? What does the team think? All replies gratefully accepted and considered.
Page 3
    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 29th Mar 18, 11:19 AM
    • 57 Posts
    • 61 Thanks
    pile-o-stone
    Information on the 60 kWh battery pack.

    https://electrek.co/2018/01/04/nissan-leaf-2019-specs-range-charging/
    5.18 kWp PV systems (3.68 E/W & 1.5 E).
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 29th Mar 18, 12:55 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    Originally posted by pile-o-stone
    Thank you pile-o-stone I hadn't previously seen that.The article is certainly interesting, as are the discussions upon whether the sales of Leaf 18 will suffer as a result. If I'm honest then the current 2018 model is perfectly adequate for 99% of our journey requirements without the need to recharge partway there. Even if I did wait for the 2019 model then for the odd two or three long journeys a year I'd probably still need to recharge along the way or, if not, then for the journey home again. Also as I'm intending that the vast majority of our charging would come from PV while in the drive then the problem with three fast charges in a row is highly unlikely to happen.
    The options are still open for us either way as I see at present.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 29th Mar 18, 1:24 PM
    • 2,086 Posts
    • 2,864 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    If you look at Ev specific forums you'll find quite long threads (!) on this charging issue.

    Personally I fancy an Ioniq but that is some years away, and I'd have to sort out hard standing for parking and a dropped kerb in addition to all the other costs. The solar panels have been in place for years but they come out quite cheaply in the scheme of things!
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 10th Apr 18, 6:37 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    I've taken the plunge and ordered our PV array, all 26 panels 7.67kwp. That's providing our local DNO approve. A date has been set for the installation in two weeks time so can only assume my installers are quietly confident of receiving approval. In the intervening period I've continued searching for that illusive V2H solution in order to make full use of Solar energy and the storage capacity of an EV. Sadly it doesn't appear to be on the horizon over here other than through home battery storage. I have to agree with others that it is just not cost effective currently i.e.4.2kwh xStorage at circa 4k or 6.5kwh Tesla 1 at 4.5 both requiring the addition of installation plus VAT. The latter being at either 5% or 20% apparently.
    When test driving the new Leaf we'd almost got to the point of ordering an Accenta with optional extras of Parking sensors and Metallic paint.
    Even with an EV mostly sitting on the drive I can see that an additional home battery would be of benefit and have been wrestling with how I could possibly justify the expense. The probable answer is I cannot. However, if I settled for the basic model of the Leaf instead of the Acenta then about 3k would be released to put towards a home battery installation. Maybe I'm kidding myself and it may seem a strange way of trying to settle matters. Given the choice of either a slightly higher spec car or a home battery installation, which I wonder, returns the best value?
    Last edited by Coastalwatch; 10-04-2018 at 6:39 PM.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 11th Apr 18, 7:32 AM
    • 7,443 Posts
    • 11,921 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    May I bore you with some personal thoughts?

    Too late, here I go.

    From an environmental point of view, batts can shift low carbon leccy into the high carbon period (evening peak) so in the medium/long term, they are an environmental benefit.

    But, at the moment, we do not have too much RE generation at any one time, so PV consumed or exported from a house to the neighbours will directly reduce the amount of gas generation in the country.

    So whilst PV is a good thing today, and even 8yrs ago when the FiT was launched, as it provides an environmental benefit, the argument for storage is a bit weaker.

    Now for the economic side - PV needed support from the wealthier nations, to make it viable for all, including the poorer nations that couldn't afford subsidies. The very same could be said about batts, but whereas PV sat, relatively un-economical for abot 50yrs, batts are progressing naturally through electronic device rollout and now massive deployment of EV's and large scale batts.

    Also, batt prices (domestic storage) are still falling, and prices over the next 5yrs will outweigh any savings. That's a wait till it gets better scenario that has many weaknesses, but in this particular instance is OK as the large scale deployment of batts is assured, even if you and I don't take part.

    So whilst buying a batt sounds fun, and I'm really keen to get started, I personally feel that in this case economics trump environmental issues. [Not an argument I'm particularly comfortable with, but I think on this occasion is fair.]

    That's not a criticism of early adopters, we need them of course to help develop a supply chain and install industry, I'm just trying to justify the environmental argument to allow us to fall back on the economic argument for now.


    Or the short answer - Nothing wrong with sitting back and waiting for now.
    Last edited by Martyn1981; 11-04-2018 at 7:34 AM.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 11th Apr 18, 7:35 PM
    • 3,290 Posts
    • 2,118 Thanks
    Ectophile
    Have Nissan never heard of the Osborne Effect (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_effect)?

    Every year they tell us that next year's model will be better than this year's. So what reason do I have for buying this year's one?
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 11th Apr 18, 9:34 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    Not boring at all. Thanks for bringing some constructive logic to bear. It certainly makes sense, I guess I just need to apply a smidgeon of patience. The saving of 180 or so a year is hardly a sound basis for spending 6k however I try to justify it.
    On the other hand, I could apply some of the 3k saving towards ASHP by adding a second indoor unit to the bedroom. Probably as much for cooling on hot summer nights as opposed to any form of heating.

    Thanks for the reality check.
    • silverwhistle
    • By silverwhistle 12th Apr 18, 3:32 PM
    • 2,086 Posts
    • 2,864 Thanks
    silverwhistle
    I see you're progressing well. I haven't looked at all the details as I'm not yet near buying an EV, but there is something called a Zappi which diverts spare Pv power to your EV. If you haven't already seen this via the EV forums it might be worth a look.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 24th Apr 18, 5:20 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    Well, at close of play today we should have a fully functional PV array in place. The installation engineer arrived yesterday morning. Following a quick reccie he said he would get on with fixing the anchor points in preparation for the arrival of the panels later that day and the Electricians arrival the next(today). They all duly arrived this morning, explained the layout of all necessary equipment alongside the consumer unit in the garage together with the routing of cables etc. Apparently the solar panels had been delayed but were due for delivery later in the morning. The Inverter, a second consumer unit, a meter, a DC and two AC isolation switches were all installed and connections made to all the optimisers.
    Unfortunately the only thing missing is the Solar panels, understood to be on the back of the delivery lorry parked up somewhere with the driver out of his allowed driving hours!
    Rather frustrating for all concerned so just keeping fingers crossed they arrive in good time in the morning to allow for a successful completion tomorrow!
    • frozen_wastes
    • By frozen_wastes 26th Apr 18, 3:15 PM
    • 48 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    frozen_wastes
    I'm reading this post with interest, as my eventual plan will be to replace my Diesel with an EV (next 3 years or so, so my thought is that I want to generate as much juice as I have space for.


    I've been measuring up on my roof and I'm able to get 28 LG NeON2 panels on my roof in a 4x4 configuration facing SSW and a 4x3 config facing ESE.


    That's 9.24kWP (330W per panel)! That's about 10MWH annually, or about 37000miles in a Tesla Model 3. That's how I think of such numbers!


    So this DNO restriction at 3.68kWP interests me. Is the restriction on the power **exported** through their meter, or the *generating capacity* of the system (i.e. The DNO doesn't care if it's consumed on site, or even if the generating capacity is not running at all - they only care if there's an electrical connection to their grid).


    I've got a few design ideas to get round this system. One is to have a single inverter between the DC and AC networks limited to 3.68kWP. Then I could have heavy consumers on the DC network, such as a battery or DC car charger.


    I know, there's no FIT metering with that solution, but FIT's will disappear by the time I get a PV array commissioned on my roof so that's eventually going to be a non issue.


    The other thought is a split system - 3.68kwP grid connect on one array, and an Islanded system on the other. The thought in my mind is that it should be possible to have a three way automatic switch that swaps your house consumer unit between the grid connection and your islanded system. Technically you wouldn't be connected to the grid - the switch can be thrown at the 0 Volt crossover as soon as it detects that their's enough juice being generated by the Islanded array to supply the load.


    But either way, I think the amount being charged to get DNO permission for connecting large PV arrays will be such that technical workarounds will end up being more cost effective.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 26th Apr 18, 4:24 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    Well, at close of play today we should have a fully functional PV array in place. The installation engineer arrived yesterday morning. Following a quick reccie he said he would get on with fixing the anchor points in preparation for the arrival of the panels later that day and the Electricians arrival the next(today). They all duly arrived this morning, explained the layout of all necessary equipment alongside the consumer unit in the garage together with the routing of cables etc. Apparently the solar panels had been delayed but were due for delivery later in the morning. The Inverter, a second consumer unit, a meter, a DC and two AC isolation switches were all installed and connections made to all the optimisers.
    Unfortunately the only thing missing is the Solar panels, understood to be on the back of the delivery lorry parked up somewhere with the driver out of his allowed driving hours!
    Rather frustrating for all concerned so just keeping fingers crossed they arrive in good time in the morning to allow for a successful completion tomorrow!
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    Thankfully the panels arrived around 8am, one sealed pallet load weighing 600kg, followed by the installation engineer some twenty minutes later. By mid day the panels were all in place with optimisers connected.

    As he switched on it was certainly interesting watching the LCD display and seeing the pairing take place between the system and each of the thirty panels installed. Generation began almost immediately, fluctuating considerably as clouds passed across the otherwise blue sky. Output figures ranged from 970w to 5990w. All seemed to be working as it should, so the Leccy's must have done a good job with the cabling and Inverter etc the day before when setting it all in place.

    With the system up and running it just left the birdproofing to fit around the perimeter of the array and all would be complete. The engineer must even have scanned a picture of the array back to the office with the individual panel ID's on for them to add to their system and hence forward to SolarEdge, for later that afternoon I'd received an email from SE inviting me to log on to the system, thus enabling me to monitor it's output. By dusk, 18kwh had been added to the generation Meter while the Utility meter incremented by a single kwh in the same period.

    I know it's early days, but after a frustrating day previously, the system is working faultlessly, apart from those annoying clouds that will persist in blotting out the sun.

    As I write this the array has produced 38.5kwh so far today. Now I'm not entirely sure what constitutes an Hawaii, but with an 8.85kwp array I suspect that another 6kwh or so might see us achieve one!

    So, phase one is complete just the EV, charge point, ASHP & Storage to sort now. Thanks to everyone who contributed to my education on this intriguing subject. It would have been a nightmare without your knowledgeable advice.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 26th Apr 18, 4:55 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    I'm reading this post with interest, as my eventual plan will be to replace my Diesel with an EV (next 3 years or so, so my thought is that I want to generate as much juice as I have space for.

    I've been measuring up on my roof and I'm able to get 28 LG NeON2 panels on my roof in a 4x4 configuration facing SSW and a 4x3 config facing ESE.

    That's 9.24kWP (330W per panel)! That's about 10MWH annually, or about 37000miles in a Tesla Model 3. That's how I think of such numbers!

    So this DNO restriction at 3.68kWP interests me. Is the restriction on the power **exported** through their meter, or the *generating capacity* of the system (i.e. The DNO doesn't care if it's consumed on site, or even if the generating capacity is not running at all - they only care if there's an electrical connection to their grid).

    I know, there's no FIT metering with that solution, but FIT's will disappear by the time I get a PV array commissioned on my roof so that's eventually going to be a non issue.

    But either way, I think the amount being charged to get DNO permission for connecting large PV arrays will be such that technical workarounds will end up being more cost effective.
    Originally posted by frozen_wastes
    Hi F W and welcome to the thread.

    Afraid I'm not able to advise in any way other than what I've experienced in the process so far and certainly not from a technical background. However, with regard to DNO permission and it's apparent cost I can only advise that in my case the installation company have handled it entirely with no cost to ourselves. While in some cases it may be a problem due to the local infrastructure and cost maybe involved I found that several companies actively tried to dissuade me from having anything other than a 4kwp system due to the dreaded DNO or even local council in one instance. In fact, having previously agreed on a 26 panel array, when the installation guy arrived he felt he could get another four panels on if I wanted. So we did, once having checked with the office that the Inverter would accommodate them!

    As for not going for the panels now while FIT is still available then, why not. You could have your cake and eat it providing the company you choose and your negotiating skills are up to it. Your roof seems almost ideal for the system you propose, although others are perhaps better placed to judge than me. Either way you've come to the right place, I'm sure others will join in to ease your path along the way. Good luck.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 27th Apr 18, 8:57 AM
    • 7,443 Posts
    • 11,921 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    I'm reading this post with interest, as my eventual plan will be to replace my Diesel with an EV (next 3 years or so, so my thought is that I want to generate as much juice as I have space for.


    I've been measuring up on my roof and I'm able to get 28 LG NeON2 panels on my roof in a 4x4 configuration facing SSW and a 4x3 config facing ESE.


    That's 9.24kWP (330W per panel)! That's about 10MWH annually, or about 37000miles in a Tesla Model 3. That's how I think of such numbers!


    So this DNO restriction at 3.68kWP interests me. Is the restriction on the power **exported** through their meter, or the *generating capacity* of the system (i.e. The DNO doesn't care if it's consumed on site, or even if the generating capacity is not running at all - they only care if there's an electrical connection to their grid).


    I've got a few design ideas to get round this system. One is to have a single inverter between the DC and AC networks limited to 3.68kWP. Then I could have heavy consumers on the DC network, such as a battery or DC car charger.


    I know, there's no FIT metering with that solution, but FIT's will disappear by the time I get a PV array commissioned on my roof so that's eventually going to be a non issue.


    The other thought is a split system - 3.68kwP grid connect on one array, and an Islanded system on the other. The thought in my mind is that it should be possible to have a three way automatic switch that swaps your house consumer unit between the grid connection and your islanded system. Technically you wouldn't be connected to the grid - the switch can be thrown at the 0 Volt crossover as soon as it detects that their's enough juice being generated by the Islanded array to supply the load.


    But either way, I think the amount being charged to get DNO permission for connecting large PV arrays will be such that technical workarounds will end up being more cost effective.
    Originally posted by frozen_wastes
    Good questions, can I throw out claims without links as I need to run in a bit (I've got a boarded guide dog with bad eyes, and an angry feral cat at a rescue center I have to look after), but will chart later properly.

    So, straight off, you can ask the DNO for more export permission, the 3.68kW is the standing rule, after that applications need to be made, you might get more, I have 5.9kW permission.

    Next, would three phase be viable? It'll cost a lot for the upgrade but would give you 3x3.68kW.

    You are right to consider export v's generation. The DNO does not care how much PV you have, nor how much generation you get, they care about what you send out onto the local network.

    So do some research, there are commercial systems (try EMMA GVS) for background reading, this limits export, not generation, so thereby takes account of any on-site consumption before getting the inverter(s) to cap. I'm not sure if there are any DNO approved domestic systems, but worth a look.

    I do know that DC batt systems are available, these will send any unwanted generation to the batts for later use, rather than converting to AC there and then, so let's say the batts can be charged at 2kW, then (ignoring AC/DC conversions, losses etc) let's just say you could generate 5.68kW, as only 3.68kW AC would be produced.

    You won't lose FiTs on a DC system as it will be clocked up by the FiT meter when it is discharged through the inverter for use, however the battery efficiency losses will lose FiTs, but that's not too bad.

    You could go for multi systems but you may need to have different leccy systems in the house with dedicated uses to avoid any chance of DNO issues.

    No idea if an EV can be DC charged at home, I know that DC fast charging is provided at rapid sites, no idea if home systems exist, but would be interested to know.

    You say 9.24kWp and SSW + ESE, is that correct? Just checking as usually there's a 180d difference, not 90d, so presumably a hip roof or similar?

    So, let's assume they generate at similar times as they are not 180d apart, so total guess let's knock 10% off for max output, then my usual guess at a hot panel sustained max of 80%, gives us a peak of around 70% of kWp = 6.5kW. that's way too high to ignore capping, so yep you do need to think this through carefully, but can I annoyingly state that's it's not a bad problem to have, I'd love to have that much too much generation. So the problem is the solution, so to speak. Should be an interesting discussion. Back later.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • frozen_wastes
    • By frozen_wastes 27th Apr 18, 2:36 PM
    • 48 Posts
    • 11 Thanks
    frozen_wastes
    So, straight off, you can ask the DNO for more export permission, the 3.68kW is the standing rule, after that applications need to be made, you might get more, I have 5.9kW permission.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981

    Thanks for your feedback. I'll try asking and see what they say. There's one person on my street already with a 14 panel array, so that may make it more difficult to get permission. My expectation was that any kind of authority wanted money first to a question like that before giving an answer back.




    So do some research, there are commercial systems (try EMMA GVS) for background reading, this limits export, not generation, so thereby takes account of any on-site consumption before getting the inverter(s) to cap. I'm not sure if there are any DNO approved domestic systems, but worth a look.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981

    I was having a look at the solar edge inverters. They have export limitation as seen on Page 35 of the brochure:
    https://www.solaredge.com/sites/default/files/residential_catalogue_eng.pdf


    They also have DC batteries coupled to the solar DC network (Page 25), which was the kind of topology I was looking for.


    Next, would three phase be viable? It'll cost a lot for the upgrade but would give you 3x3.68kW.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981

    I suspect that three phase would mean that two extra transformers would have to be installed at the nearest 11KV line, and two new 240V electrical cables would have to be buried underground from that station to my house. I can't imagine that being cheap at all. I think power management solutions in my house is far more economic.


    But that said, Tesla do offer 15KW three phase car chargers. I've often thought that 10KW chargers would be needed for overnight charging once 100kwH batteries become the norm in EV's.


    But I was thinking that a DC car charger would naturally be a good candidate for also helping to limit the export power through the invertor. You also reduce losses by avoiding conversion from DC --> AC --> DC. But I've not seen a domestic solution that offer's DC car charging.


    You say 9.24kWp and SSW + ESE, is that correct? Just checking as usually there's a 180d difference, not 90d, so presumably a hip roof or similar?
    Originally posted by Martyn1981

    I live in a T shaped bungalow with two roof ridges perpendicular to each other. I live in NE scotland, and one of my other villagers has got a 12x Panel array using the LG Neon 2 panels (6 facing E, and 6 facing W) He's generating 3.4MWH annually, so I reckon that 8-10MWH would be doable for me.


    One achilles heal that doesn't seem to be solved yet is grid blackout. It's not a major problem where I live, but all the solar inverters have anti-islanding systems to shutdown your generation. Very annoying when it happens. When I go back to page 25 of that brochure I linked above, my immediate thought is that the meter on the main grid incomer could also bedeveloped into an automatic isolator, thus allowing your property to work off-grid, and protecting the grid from your power source.


    A lot of people in Florida weren't happy when hurricane Irma came through and knocked out their domestic solar systems. So I'm hoping the manufacturers wake up to that problem and develop a solution for that situation. I'm aware that Enphase has a micro inverter that keeps generating in a blackout, so that sounds promising.
    Last edited by frozen_wastes; 27-04-2018 at 2:45 PM.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 27th Apr 18, 3:25 PM
    • 7,443 Posts
    • 11,921 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    I suspect that three phase would mean that two extra transformers would have to be installed at the nearest 11KV line, and two new 240V electrical cables would have to be buried underground from that station to my house. I can't imagine that being cheap at all. I think power management solutions in my house is far more economic.
    Originally posted by frozen_wastes
    Hiya, still running around, and have MSE friends coming over later (turns out not everyone on T'internet is an axe murderer in disquise), but everything you've posted makes sense, certainly interesting to me, as I know of it, but not necessarily about it all. I'm more of an interested (nosey) bystander.

    Your DNO might, just might be willing to have a friendly informal chat with you. They can only OK an application from an appropriately qualified sparkie, but they should be able to tell you if it's gonna be a no. If it's not a definite no, then that would then suggest a possible yes IYSWIM.

    Regarding 3phase, I'm way out of my depth here, but your street should have 3 phase, with every 3rd house on one phase, 1/3rd on another, and so on. I've no idea if that changes anything, and TBH I suspect the ideas a no go anyway due to cost, but perhaps something worth mentioning if you are having a nice chat with the DNO.

    Bye for now.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • EricMears
    • By EricMears 27th Apr 18, 6:40 PM
    • 2,348 Posts
    • 4,112 Thanks
    EricMears
    But I was thinking that a DC car charger would naturally be a good candidate for also helping to limit the export power through the invertor. You also reduce losses by avoiding conversion from DC --> AC --> DC. But I've not seen a domestic solution that offer's DC car charging.
    Originally posted by frozen_wastes
    Main problem with that is of course that generation (& hence FIT payments) is based on readings of an AC generation meter.

    FWIW, I have both PV and a BEV but very seldom bother to charge the car with solar power. I can't reduce the car's charging rate below 10A and very seldom have that much 'free' electricity. Hence I invariably use E7 to charge the car and use SP to run washing machine, dishwasher etc.
    N Derbyshire.
    4kwp S Facing 17.5deg slope (dormer roof).
    • Ectophile
    • By Ectophile 27th Apr 18, 10:04 PM
    • 3,290 Posts
    • 2,118 Thanks
    Ectophile
    My Solax inverter has an islanded mode for power cuts. It's manually operated. If the power goes out, I have to crawl into the meter cupboard to operate a switch. This disconnects the main house consumer unit from the grid, and connects it directly to the inverter. Once I do that, I'm running off solar and/or battery.

    Rather oddly, when the power comes back on, it automatically turns off islanded mode, blacking out the house again until I set the switch back to its normal position. I could probably disable that by flipping the breaker in the small consumer unit that feeds the inverter, so it doesn't know the mains is back on until I want it to.

    So far, I have never needed islanded mode.
    If it sticks, force it.
    If it breaks, well it wasn't working right anyway.
    • mickdann
    • By mickdann 25th Jun 18, 10:38 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    mickdann
    Hello Dave, your device sounds interesting, would you be able to send me details too please?
    • Dave Fowler
    • By Dave Fowler 25th Jun 18, 1:55 PM
    • 484 Posts
    • 849 Thanks
    Dave Fowler
    Hello Dave, your device sounds interesting, would you be able to send me details too please?
    Originally posted by mickdann
    PM sent


    Dave F
    Solar PV System 1: 2.96kWp South+8 degrees. Roof 38 degrees. 'Normal' system
    Solar PV System 2: 3.00kWp South-4 degrees. Roof 28 degrees. SolarEdge system
    EV car
    Location: Bedfordshire
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 14th Jul 18, 6:00 PM
    • 202 Posts
    • 752 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    So, having had a PV array installed late April and enjoyed nearly three months of abundant generation I became rather frustrated that 90% of it was going to the grid. Having trawled various websites and publications for an as new 40kWh Leaf without success I found a Nissan Dealership offering a very good deal on a brand new N-Connector. Coincidentally a few days later another dealer phoned offering a second hand Zero, Special edition, with 2k on the clock for approx 1k less! Having already committed to the former we were saved from the problem of wrestling with which to choose!

    It was delivered yesterday and to date we're delighted with it, early days as yet I know. A Zappi is on order although the granny cable connected via a three pin plug topped the battery up with approx 8kWh of Solar power over a sunny four hour period yesterday.
    A heartfelt thanks to you all for the advice so freely given(and mostly adherred too) without which I doubt we should have got this far.
    Just home storage, V2H and ASHP to sort.

    Patience, patience I hear you say.
    East coast, lat 51.97. 8.26kw SSE, 23 pitch + 0.59kw WSW vertical. Nissan Leaf plus one dirty diesel. Still waiting for V2H and home storage to become available at sensible cost.
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