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  • FIRST POST
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 13th Feb 18, 4:42 PM
    • 59Posts
    • 78Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    "Looking for a PV and EV solution"
    • #1
    • 13th Feb 18, 4:42 PM
    "Looking for a PV and EV solution" 13th Feb 18 at 4:42 PM
    I've an ageing deisel powered Ford Focus(ten years 75k miles) which has been brilliant but am thinking to replace it. Looking ahead Electric(second hand) seems a possible choice especially as we have two vehicles, so can use the other for long distances. We are retired with a mix of local journeys for school run etc and longer distances for holidays etc. I'm also keen on the idea of being self sufficient in generating electricity and considering combining the two. Our bungalow has roof of some 50 sq metres with a 22 degree pitch and being 20 degrees east of south facing. I'm thinking of filling the entire roof with panels in order to generate the max I can. On a good day in summer it could return circa 35kwh so I don't see a problem in supplying household needs(7kwh/day) and keeping the EV topped up. Am seeking quotations for systems of 4k only and the max that can be acheived also. Presumably I'd still get the FIT and export returns on the larger system so it would appear to me to be a sound financial investment. Battery storage is also an option but at current prices of 1000/kwh I'm not convinced of a sensible return. I note there is also a subsidy for installing a charging point. Would this be sensible? What does the team think? All replies gratefully accepted and considered.
Page 2
    • Wobblydeb
    • By Wobblydeb 5th Mar 18, 1:30 PM
    • 947 Posts
    • 1,440 Thanks
    Wobblydeb
    The zappi looks a great bit of kit and I may well be tempted to have one installed. However at the outset of this thread I had hoped to utilise any excess PV output in charging an EV and wonder if it's limited output would necessitate installing a charge point. After all, with a granny cable and 13A supply wouldn't these cope with most of what the Solar panels would charge at!
    Given that I should be able to charge through most of the daylight hours, am I just being too simplistic in my out look here?
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    No, not too simplistic, and it would work to utilise a good chunk of the electricity you generate. I think the main drawback to the granny cable solution is that it takes much longer to charge. 7-10 hours to fully charge a Leaf, depending upon version. BUT ..... if you are only driving a few miles a day then you will not need a full charge every day. The problem will come if you for instance, go out in the morning and back at lunch time with an empty battery and then want to go out again in the afternoon / evening.

    A dedicated 32A car charger will bring that time down to 4-6 hours. It will always pull 32A though, so will be using grid electricity a lot of the time.

    The Zappi is ahead of a standard charger by being more flexible - so you can get a quicker charge if needed, or alternatively just use exactly what is available from your panels.
    I've got a plan so cunning you could put a tail on it and call it a weasel.
    • Dave Fowler
    • By Dave Fowler 5th Mar 18, 7:52 PM
    • 469 Posts
    • 831 Thanks
    Dave Fowler
    I'd like to give it a try Dave.
    Been using energysavingexp's idea for almost 6 years.
    Modified it slightly, but for an outlay of just over 20.00 it's been great!
    Originally posted by legoman62
    PM sent.

    Dave F
    Solar PV System 1: 2.96kWp South+8 degrees. Roof 38 degrees. 'Normal' system
    Solar PV System 2: 3.00kWp South-4 degrees. Roof 28 degrees. SolarEdge system
    EV car
    Location: Bedfordshire
    • ASavvyBuyer
    • By ASavvyBuyer 5th Mar 18, 8:54 PM
    • 750 Posts
    • 1,931 Thanks
    ASavvyBuyer
    PM sent.

    Dave F
    Originally posted by Dave Fowler
    I would also like to try it.

    Please could you send me details.

    Thanks
    Rhondda Cynon Taf, 4kWp, W roof, 30 pitch, 16 x 8.33 Eternity 250w E+10 panels, Solar Edge SE4000-16A Inverter + P300 Optimisers & REUK Diverter
    + Toshiba RAS-10G2KVP-E Ultra High Efficiency Air Conditioner/Heat Pump
    • Dave Fowler
    • By Dave Fowler 6th Mar 18, 10:55 AM
    • 469 Posts
    • 831 Thanks
    Dave Fowler
    I would also like to try it.

    Please could you send me details.

    Thanks
    Originally posted by ASavvyBuyer
    PM sent

    Dave F
    Solar PV System 1: 2.96kWp South+8 degrees. Roof 38 degrees. 'Normal' system
    Solar PV System 2: 3.00kWp South-4 degrees. Roof 28 degrees. SolarEdge system
    EV car
    Location: Bedfordshire
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 6th Mar 18, 4:56 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    No, not too simplistic, and it would work to utilise a good chunk of the electricity you generate. I think the main drawback to the granny cable solution is that it takes much longer to charge. 7-10 hours to fully charge a Leaf, depending upon version. BUT ..... if you are only driving a few miles a day then you will not need a full charge every day. The problem will come if you for instance, go out in the morning and back at lunch time with an empty battery and then want to go out again in the afternoon / evening.

    A dedicated 32A car charger will bring that time down to 4-6 hours. It will always pull 32A though, so will be using grid electricity a lot of the time.

    The Zappi is ahead of a standard charger by being more flexible - so you can get a quicker charge if needed, or alternatively just use exactly what is available from your panels.
    Originally posted by Wobblydeb
    Thanks Wobbleydeb, I have to confess to being sorely tempted as it seems to offer much more than a standard EV charger.
    I maybe trying to have my cake and eat it but, picking up on a post from Martyn1981 some time ago I also wonder if the process couldn't be reversed, so that we could use a small percentage of the charge to service our overnight domestic requirements. Perhaps 2-3kwh's worth!
    I did pluck up courage and asked the question of Zappi but unfortunately this doesn't appear to be on the horizon at present! It would certainly solve the problem of purchasing separate storage battery/s for this purpose! I reckon Martyn and I would be first in the queue for such a gizmo!

    In the meantime I have to come to terms with actually purchasing an EV. Not easy with a lifetimes experience of the oily stuff. But slowly does it and I have to confess to booking a test drive in one of the new Leaf's. Just testing mind!
    • Dave Fowler
    • By Dave Fowler 6th Mar 18, 6:23 PM
    • 469 Posts
    • 831 Thanks
    Dave Fowler
    I maybe trying to have my cake and eat it but, picking up on a post from Martyn1981 some time ago I also wonder if the process couldn't be reversed, so that we could use a small percentage of the charge to service our overnight domestic requirements. Perhaps 2-3kwh's worth!
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    Not only do you have to have a compatible charger if you wish to use the car as an energy source, but you also need a compatible car. i.e. one which has a connection capable of reverse flow - out of the car. I don't think any of the current main stream cars can do this yet.

    Dave F
    Solar PV System 1: 2.96kWp South+8 degrees. Roof 38 degrees. 'Normal' system
    Solar PV System 2: 3.00kWp South-4 degrees. Roof 28 degrees. SolarEdge system
    EV car
    Location: Bedfordshire
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 6th Mar 18, 9:02 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    Not only do you have to have a compatible charger if you wish to use the car as an energy source, but you also need a compatible car. i.e. one which has a connection capable of reverse flow - out of the car. I don't think any of the current main stream cars can do this yet.

    Dave F
    Originally posted by Dave Fowler
    Thanks Dave, from my very limited understanding that's just about what Zappi said. No doubt naivety on my part, but I find it strange that it's possible to charge a storage battery of a several kwh's and then use when the need arises but not that of a battery in an EV.

    It may not be possible now, but surely it must be something industry is aiming for, or am I just being rather selfish!

    Really pleased to see you've two members interested in your design. Hope they let us know of progress!
    • zeupater
    • By zeupater 6th Mar 18, 9:34 PM
    • 4,135 Posts
    • 5,355 Thanks
    zeupater
    Thanks Dave, from my very limited understanding that's just about what Zappi said. No doubt naivety on my part, but I find it strange that it's possible to charge a storage battery of a several kwh's and then use when the need arises but not that of a battery in an EV.

    It may not be possible now, but surely it must be something industry is aiming for, or am I just being rather selfish! ..
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    Hi

    The issue at the moment seems to revolve around international standardisation of EV charging and the required V2G communication protocols ... last time I looked the standards were being targetted for release some time in 2019.

    I'd hazard a guess that the automotive side of the standards will be pretty straightforward as the industry has plenty of experience on collaboration & standardisation ... if there is to be an issue it'll be when the power generation & distribution sector & various levels of government become involved, so expect vehicle V2G smart functionality to be ready well before the smart-grid is able to communicate and take advantage ...

    HTH
    Z
    "We are what we repeatedly do, excellence then is not an act, but a habit. " ...... Aristotle
    • Wobblydeb
    • By Wobblydeb 7th Mar 18, 11:30 AM
    • 947 Posts
    • 1,440 Thanks
    Wobblydeb
    It may not be possible now, but surely it must be something industry is aiming for, or am I just being rather selfish!
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    It's certainly something that Nissan are trialling, so I guess some of the other manufacturers will be too. How far away it is in the UK is anyone's guess!

    https://www.nissan-global.com/EN/TECHNOLOGY/OVERVIEW/vehicle_to_home.html
    I've got a plan so cunning you could put a tail on it and call it a weasel.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 7th Mar 18, 5:52 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    Hi

    The issue at the moment seems to revolve around international standardisation of EV charging and the required V2G communication protocols ... last time I looked the standards were being targetted for release some time in 2019.

    I'd hazard a guess that the automotive side of the standards will be pretty straightforward as the industry has plenty of experience on collaboration & standardisation ... if there is to be an issue it'll be when the power generation & distribution sector & various levels of government become involved, so expect vehicle V2G smart functionality to be ready well before the smart-grid is able to communicate and take advantage ...

    HTH
    Z
    Originally posted by zeupater
    Oh dear Zeup, if their record on Smart Metering is anything to go by then I suspect I'm going to be long gone before it's available!
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 12th Mar 18, 5:37 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    Hiya. I rang my DNO and got lots of help, but that was years ago. For actual permission the installer has to apply, but hopefully the DNO can let you know (as mine did) if it's a no - but they won't say yes without the application, just a 'minded' response.

    For upto 5kWp of panels you'll be OK with a 3.68kW capped inverter. Ideally you want permission for more from the DNO, but once hot, the panel performance will drop to about 80%, so losses won't be so bad, and all the time that generation is poor (early, late, winter, bad weather) it won't matter.

    For a split system with say East and West panels then 6kWp on 3.68kW might be fine, but I assume you'll install all panels on the SSE orientation (-20 from south).

    Size wise, go as big as possible/sensible. A lot of costs are fixed, whereas the PV panels and the roof railing are pretty cheap, so cost per Wp gets lower as you go bigger. for instance 4kWp might be 6k (1.50 per Wp), but 6kWp might be 8k (1.33 per Wp).


    On-grid domestic battery storage
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Well I've progressed further and would like to settle on a total of 26 panels. 24 on the SSE roof and 2 on the vertical wall of the WSW gable end, total 7.41kwp made up of 6.84 on the roof and 0.57 at gable end.
    I have one supplier who has no problem with this, using one inverter while the other is insisting that two are required. He has even sent me a Solaredge download showing 2 x SE3500H inverters.
    Strangely when only 24 panels are required of 6.84kwp one is acceptable.

    From my understanding of info gleaned from your goodselves then I believe that the SE6000H inverter should cope adequately. While the total panel output might be 7.41. Because they are in different orientations, 90 degrees offset, then this figure will not be seen and with only 80% efficiency once they are hot(as Martyn suggests) then even less likely. From the SolarEdge spec sheet for the SE6000H unit then max DC input is 9300w.
    I'm struggling to see a problem with a single inverter but if you know differently then I'm happy to be shown the error of my ways to date!
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 12th Mar 18, 5:56 PM
    • 6,864 Posts
    • 11,107 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    Well I've progressed further and would like to settle on a total of 26 panels. 24 on the SSE roof and 2 on the vertical wall of the WSW gable end, total 7.41kwp made up of 6.84 on the roof and 0.57 at gable end.
    I have one supplier who has no problem with this, using one inverter while the other is insisting that two are required. He has even sent me a Solaredge download showing 2 x SE3500H inverters.
    Strangely when only 24 panels are required of 6.84kwp one is acceptable.

    From my understanding of info gleaned from your goodselves then I believe that the SE6000H inverter should cope adequately. While the total panel output might be 7.41. Because they are in different orientations, 90 degrees offset, then this figure will not be seen and with only 80% efficiency once they are hot(as Martyn suggests) then even less likely. From the SolarEdge spec sheet for the SE6000H unit then max DC input is 9300w.
    I'm struggling to see a problem with a single inverter but if you know differently then I'm happy to be shown the error of my ways to date!
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    26 panels, are you mad? ...... hang on, I've got 26 ..... yep, mad!

    First off, don't trust anything I say. I'm reciting stuff I've heard, read and seen, but that doesn't mean I'm right. The SE6000HD looks (to me) to be about perfect. It can output 6kW and input 9.3kW, so that seems ideal, but let's check.

    Let's forget the vertical panels, with such a different size, orientation and pitch, I think it's safe to just discuss the main 6.84kWp.

    So, at 80% sustained output, that's about 5.5kW, or at 85%, about 5.8kW, so that seems acceptable. There will be times when output would be higher, but I honestly don't think it adds up 'to a hill of beans' - interested what others think though.

    Also, I'd have thought one inverter is better than two, less cost, less replacement cost in 20yrs (if it fails) and probably slightly more efficient than 2 smaller inverters.

    So ....... I think the SE6000HD is the right answer, but does the installer know more than us, he/she should. So are we missing anything?

    I'd be tempted to e-mail SolarEdge themselves or ring the UK offices and ask.

    Relatively simple question, detail the panel type, the number, the orientations/pitches, and ask if the SE6000HD is suitable, and perhaps also ask if two SE3500HD's would be ok/better.

    Obviously, whatever you hear back, please post it on here so we can all learn and others can share too.

    Sound like a plan?
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 12th Mar 18, 6:00 PM
    • 6,864 Posts
    • 11,107 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    Well I've progressed further and would like to settle on a total of 26 panels.
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    Hiya, does this mean you have been OK'd for the bigger system by the DNO, are you hoping/expecting to get 6kW export permission?
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 12th Mar 18, 11:16 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    26 panels, are you mad? ...... hang on, I've got 26 ..... yep, mad!


    Let's forget the vertical panels, with such a different size, orientation and pitch, I think it's safe to just discuss the main 6.84kWp.

    So, at 80% sustained output, that's about 5.5kW, or at 85%, about 5.8kW, so that seems acceptable. There will be times when output would be higher, but I honestly don't think it adds up 'to a hill of beans' - interested what others think though.

    Also, I'd have thought one inverter is better than two, less cost, less replacement cost in 20yrs (if it fails) and probably slightly more efficient than 2 smaller inverters.

    So ....... I think the SE6000HD is the right answer, but does the installer know more than us, he/she should. So are we missing anything?

    I'd be tempted to e-mail SolarEdge themselves or ring the UK offices and ask.

    Relatively simple question, detail the panel type, the number, the orientations/pitches, and ask if the SE6000HD is suitable, and perhaps also ask if two SE3500HD's would be ok/better.

    Obviously, whatever you hear back, please post it on here so we can all learn and others can share too.

    Sound like a plan?
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Thanks Martyn, I reckon it takes one to know one!

    As suggested I've emailed the uk office and will post their response verbatim. Whatever the outcome I hope they declare a positive conclusion one way or the other. Either it meets specification or it doesn't!

    Struggling to get quotes for installation of ASHP, but suspect that it's not too critical if it's conducted in isolation to the panels!
    • pile-o-stone
    • By pile-o-stone 13th Mar 18, 12:53 PM
    • 44 Posts
    • 38 Thanks
    pile-o-stone
    We have 23 panels installed. 16 x 250w and 6 x 300w. If I were buying now I think I'd go with the most efficient I could find, which I think is about 360w to 370w? If you fitted 26 x 365w panels (to split the difference) you'd have a potential generation of 9.49kw which would be fantastic.

    Obviously you'd need to get permission from your DNO for that much generation, which could involve a payment to 'upgrade' the grid. We are currently in negotiation with ours and he has said that we can pay 1500 and will be allowed to generate 10Kwh. This is the maximum you can generate on a single phase mains supply.

    We currently have a 3.68kwh E/W inverter attached to the 4Kw panels and a 1.5Kw inverter attached to the 1.8Kw panels. We therefor have a potential maximum generation of 5.18kw so we can install almost as much again before we hit the 10Kw limit.

    I now just need to get the missus to agree to more solar.
    3.68kW Split E/W & 1.5kW East solar arrays.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 15th Mar 18, 4:05 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch

    First off, don't trust anything I say. I'm reciting stuff I've heard, read and seen, but that doesn't mean I'm right. The SE6000HD looks (to me) to be about perfect. It can output 6kW and input 9.3kW, so that seems ideal, but let's check.

    Let's forget the vertical panels, with such a different size, orientation and pitch, I think it's safe to just discuss the main 6.84kWp.

    So, at 80% sustained output, that's about 5.5kW, or at 85%, about 5.8kW, so that seems acceptable. There will be times when output would be higher, but I honestly don't think it adds up 'to a hill of beans' - interested what others think though.

    Also, I'd have thought one inverter is better than two, less cost, less replacement cost in 20yrs (if it fails) and probably slightly more efficient than 2 smaller inverters.

    So ....... I think the SE6000HD is the right answer, but does the installer know more than us, he/she should. So are we missing anything?

    I'd be tempted to e-mail SolarEdge themselves or ring the UK offices and ask.

    Relatively simple question, detail the panel type, the number, the orientations/pitches, and ask if the SE6000HD is suitable, and perhaps also ask if two SE3500HD's would be ok/better.

    Obviously, whatever you hear back, please post it on here so we can all learn and others can share too.

    Sound like a plan?
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Hi Martyn, as suggested I emailed SolarEdge uk directly supplying most of the information required. They replied in one day stating that in all probability it would, but they would need the actual spec of the panels to bottom it out. Supplied that info along with the requirement for the two additional vertical panels and they replied again in one day. Not only is the SE6000H suitable for 24 panels but also 26. In addition this was supported with a couple of SolarEdge documents showing this to be the case!

    Go to the top of the class Martyn, it seems you are shooting straight from the hip and not from any other part of the anatomy. Thank you.
    So that's most of the i's dotted and t's crossed(the supplier has also agreed to include bird proofing) with regards to panel array installation.

    Just the ASHP, EV and reverse charging(v2g) to sort now. Boy, what a journey!
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 15th Mar 18, 5:38 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    In the meantime I have to come to terms with actually purchasing an EV. Not easy with a lifetimes experience of the oily stuff. But slowly does it and I have to confess to booking a test drive in one of the new Leaf's. Just testing mind!
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    Just testing indeed! Well it was, but only just. We were shown the new Leaf Techna yesterday and I have to be confess to being well impressed. Of course, it was Nissan's top of the range model and any conclusions I draw are based upon driving our eleven year old Focus Ghia for the last ten years, so perhaps it's no surprise! It seemed strange at first, as when slowing down, my left foot automatically kept aiming for the clutch pedal that wasn't there! Got used to it after a while and even gave a try to their E pedal which incorporates engine braking/battery regeneration and brings the car to a comfortably controlled halt. There's not even any need to apply the hand brake(switch) when stationary. Take off from was smooth, with and without the E pedal, right up to the national speed limit. Having arrived back at the depot somebody had parked a caged trolly right in front of the parking space, making for a tight reverse manouvre, the rear pointing camera proved very useful although I still relied on the wing mirror for a clear line of vision. Mission accomplished.
    I also discovered that the new Leaf is capable of reverse charging(v2g) when xStorage comes into being soon!
    Hoping this was also available through Nissan I was disappointed to learn that it was only available through a third party, Eaton. It utilises part worn Nissan batteries with a price thought to be in the region of 5k! At this point my interest wained dramatically. Why on earth would a company assume that people will fork out another 5k for a recharging station and some part worn batteries! Afraid I rather showed my disappointment and going from nearly ordering an EV we thanked the salesman for his time and made our way home. I'm not sure who was most disappointed, us or him at missing the sale!
    I did email him later, again thanking him for his time and saying how impressed we were with the car, it was merely this one fly in the ointment causing us to hold back.
    I trawled websites upon our return trying to gain more info on xStorage such as cost and release dates but with little success. All I could find on the Nissan website was a form to complete registering a declaration of interest and seeking a payment of 50 for the priviledge! No prizes for guessing my course of action, or lack of, there.
    I did discover another account of how Nissan can now supply an array of 6 Solar panels priced at 3881, suitable for the average house, apparently. xStorageHome could be added bringing the total to 7635, thus making this second item 3754(Not sure if this included the batteries) as it stated further on that an xStorageHome battery pack was 6,446. It didn't even state what capacity it was.

    Now bearing in mind that the Leaf Visia retails around 22k, ignoring the fact that a car is also included a 40kwh battery pack works out close 500/kwh. Assuming the cost is split 50/50 car and battery then say 250kwh!

    I think my take on matters is this. If I have a 40kwh battery standing in the drive overnight why on earth should I want to fork out for another set to store in the garage! Is it just me who seems to be out of step with the cost and direction recharging seems to be taking?
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 28th Mar 18, 12:37 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch

    Now bearing in mind that the Leaf Visia retails around 22k, ignoring the fact that a car is also included a 40kwh battery pack works out close 500/kwh. Assuming the cost is split 50/50 car and battery then say 250kwh!

    I think my take on matters is this. If I have a 40kwh battery standing in the drive overnight why on earth should I want to fork out for another set to store in the garage! Is it just me who seems to be out of step with the cost and direction recharging seems to be taking?
    Originally posted by Coastalwatch
    Apparently Nissan are launching a new program to recycle old Leaf battery packs:-
    https://electrek.co/2018/03/26/nissan-leaf-battery-pack-replacement-program/

    Further information is given here on the price of new and recycled Nissan battery packs. For instance a new 24kwh battery is quoted at $6200 and 40kwh at $7800.
    A recycled pack is quoted at $2850 although it doesn't state what size this is. Even if it's 24kwh it equates to approx $120/kwh or around 85/kwh.

    60kwh batteries are due next year for the 2019 model Leafs.
    • Martyn1981
    • By Martyn1981 28th Mar 18, 3:57 PM
    • 6,864 Posts
    • 11,107 Thanks
    Martyn1981
    CW - Just out of curiosity, have you heard of 'rapidgate'?

    It's been noticed this last week that the latest Leaf's, with the 40kWh pack seem to do something 'odd' if you do too many rapid charges in a short period. Some folk have found that by the 3rd (or so) rapid charge on a long journey, the Leaf charges at 22kW not 50kW.

    No-one is quite sure why, whether it's a fault with the chargers, cars or a deliberate move by Nissan as they haven't put thermal management on the 40kWh pack, so it may get damaged if charged too fast too often.

    This should only really impact those planning .... say .... regular 500 mile trips.
    Mart. Cardiff. 5.58 kWp PV systems (3.58 ESE & 2.0 WNW)

    For general PV advice please see the PV FAQ thread on the Green & Ethical Board.
    • Coastalwatch
    • By Coastalwatch 28th Mar 18, 8:53 PM
    • 59 Posts
    • 78 Thanks
    Coastalwatch
    CW - Just out of curiosity, have you heard of 'rapidgate'?

    It's been noticed this last week that the latest Leaf's, with the 40kWh pack seem to do something 'odd' if you do too many rapid charges in a short period. Some folk have found that by the 3rd (or so) rapid charge on a long journey, the Leaf charges at 22kW not 50kW.

    No-one is quite sure why, whether it's a fault with the chargers, cars or a deliberate move by Nissan as they haven't put thermal management on the 40kWh pack, so it may get damaged if charged too fast too often.

    This should only really impact those planning .... say .... regular 500 mile trips.
    Originally posted by Martyn1981
    Thanks Martyn, that's certainly news to me. I should think of some addititonal concern it being exhibited at this time of year. Probably not too much of an issue for us with localised journeys only planned. But better to be forewarned of possible issues arising.

    Have to confess that having learned today that a 60kwh battery is planned for the 2019 model then I wouldn't mind waiting until then before making a purchase. Unless of course the 2018 model can be upgraded!

    Your post is very timely and much appreciated.
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