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    • dhokes
    • By dhokes 11th Feb 18, 10:34 AM
    • 160Posts
    • 16Thanks
    dhokes
    New build - flooring and fitted cupboards
    • #1
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:34 AM
    New build - flooring and fitted cupboards 11th Feb 18 at 10:34 AM
    I'm planning to move into a new build 2 bedroom house soon and I'm making a plan of things I need/want to do. I currently live at home so I'm in no major rush to move into the new house and I'd rather do any work needed on the new place before I move into it. There's a snagging inspection before I move in and one 2 years after I've moved in.

    I want to get wooden flooring and fitted cupboards in the main bedroom and I was wondering whether I should get the fitted cupboards installed first then the wooden flooring, or just get wooden flooring first and the fitted cupboards after 2 years once the final snagging inspection/any initial settlement cracks have formed?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
Page 1
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 11th Feb 18, 10:40 AM
    • 9,608 Posts
    • 10,687 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #2
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:40 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:40 AM
    Why would you wait for 2 years for fitted cupboards and therefore bot get best value from them, given you'll have them for two years less than you could? ????? Once you have fitted cupboards you wont see any cracks.

    I would guess its probably best to get the cupboards fitted and then the floors because otherwise maybe with expansion of floors there will be a problem if the floors are under the cupboards. But thats just a guess as a flooring expert.
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 11th Feb 18, 10:42 AM
    • 1,139 Posts
    • 1,243 Thanks
    Mutton Geoff
    • #3
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:42 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:42 AM
    I'm planning to move into a new build 2 bedroom house soon and I'm making a plan of things I need/want to do. I currently live at home so I'm in no major rush to move into the new house and I'd rather do any work needed on the new place before I move into it. There's a snagging inspection before I move in and one 2 years after I've moved in.

    I want to get wooden flooring and fitted cupboards in the main bedroom and I was wondering whether I should get the fitted cupboards installed first then the wooden flooring, or just get wooden flooring first and the fitted cupboards after 2 years once the final snagging inspection/any initial settlement cracks have formed?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
    Originally posted by dhokes


    I would ask for a snagging visit after 6 months as well. Two years is a long time to wait for a handful of niggly things to be put right.


    The order of flooring/cupboards depends on what the bottom of your cupboards looks like and how big they are. If they have a bottom shelf and you can't see the floor, there is no point wasting money on expensive flooring where you can't see it. On the other hand, are the bottom kick panels trimmed/scribed in like a kitchen? If so, you want the flooring to run a little way under so you don't have any trim fitted to hide the cut edge of the floor.


    Finally, if the footprint of the cupboard space is small, then you might as well just fit flooring up to the wall and let the cupboards sit on top. That way if you change your mind and take them out, you won't have to redo the flooring.


    If it's a new build, I'd highly recommend taking the skirting off and refitting it (or something better) after the floor goes down as those beads around the edge of the room always look naff (in my opinion). Developers often use the cheapest skirting (ie plain timber) when you can buy primed mdf skirting in loads of designs (Torus and Ogee the most common) for about 1 a metre from your local builders merchant.
    Compensations/Refunds from Banks & Institutions - 4,165 | Stooz Profits - 7,636 | Quidco - 4,014

    All with a big thank you to Martin and MSE.com from Mutton Geoff!
    • dhokes
    • By dhokes 11th Feb 18, 10:54 AM
    • 160 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    dhokes
    • #4
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:54 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:54 AM
    Why would you wait for 2 years for fitted cupboards and therefore bot get best value from them, given you'll have them for two years less than you could? ????? Once you have fitted cupboards you wont see any cracks.

    I would guess its probably best to get the cupboards fitted and then the floors because otherwise maybe with expansion of floors there will be a problem if the floors are under the cupboards. But thats just a guess as a flooring expert.
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe
    My thinking being that if I get fitted cupboards straight away and any major cracks appear on the walls behind them, it would be difficult to fill them in.
    • dhokes
    • By dhokes 11th Feb 18, 10:58 AM
    • 160 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    dhokes
    • #5
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:58 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Feb 18, 10:58 AM
    I would ask for a snagging visit after 6 months as well. Two years is a long time to wait for a handful of niggly things to be put right.


    The order of flooring/cupboards depends on what the bottom of your cupboards looks like and how big they are. If they have a bottom shelf and you can't see the floor, there is no point wasting money on expensive flooring where you can't see it. On the other hand, are the bottom kick panels trimmed/scribed in like a kitchen? If so, you want the flooring to run a little way under so you don't have any trim fitted to hide the cut edge of the floor.


    Finally, if the footprint of the cupboard space is small, then you might as well just fit flooring up to the wall and let the cupboards sit on top. That way if you change your mind and take them out, you won't have to redo the flooring.


    If it's a new build, I'd highly recommend taking the skirting off and refitting it (or something better) after the floor goes down as those beads around the edge of the room always look naff (in my opinion). Developers often use the cheapest skirting (ie plain timber) when you can buy primed mdf skirting in loads of designs (Torus and Ogee the most common) for about 1 a metre from your local builders merchant.
    Originally posted by Mutton Geoff
    I am swaying towards the idea of replacing the skirting board (depending on the cost) as I'm not a fan of beading. Should the initial skirting come off before fitting the flooring? My only concern is would removing it damage the plaster on the walls?
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 11th Feb 18, 3:11 PM
    • 9,608 Posts
    • 10,687 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #6
    • 11th Feb 18, 3:11 PM
    • #6
    • 11th Feb 18, 3:11 PM
    My thinking being that if I get fitted cupboards straight away and any major cracks appear on the walls behind them, it would be difficult to fill them in.
    Originally posted by dhokes
    You wont be able to see them, they arent structural, have a back fitted if it bothers you.Only needs be thin.

    Otherwise, unless this is your "forever" house,you want to benefit from them as long as possible. Say you stay there 5 years, and fit after 2 years, they cost the same but you only get 60% of the value as you only have them for 60% of the time.

    Or look at it another way, say they are 1000, thats 200/year if fitted immediately. Or, if you only have the benefit for 3 years (last 3 of 5) they are now 333/year or nearly 50% more expensive.
    • G_M
    • By G_M 11th Feb 18, 3:26 PM
    • 44,465 Posts
    • 52,798 Thanks
    G_M
    • #7
    • 11th Feb 18, 3:26 PM
    • #7
    • 11th Feb 18, 3:26 PM
    You really need to wait at least 5 years before you can be confidant that any settlement has resolved.

    Stay with your parents till then. At that point you can fill any cracks, install your desired flooring (your preference may have changed by then), and put in the fitted cupboards. In all likelihood there will be newer & better designs available in 5 years time too.
    Last edited by G_M; 11-02-2018 at 3:39 PM.
    • Mutton Geoff
    • By Mutton Geoff 11th Feb 18, 3:34 PM
    • 1,139 Posts
    • 1,243 Thanks
    Mutton Geoff
    • #8
    • 11th Feb 18, 3:34 PM
    • #8
    • 11th Feb 18, 3:34 PM
    I am swaying towards the idea of replacing the skirting board (depending on the cost) as I'm not a fan of beading. Should the initial skirting come off before fitting the flooring? My only concern is would removing it damage the plaster on the walls?
    Originally posted by dhokes
    It may do, but I bet it's pinned with a nailgun and possibly Gripfilled to the wall. Whilst it's new, it comes off quite easily. Even if you replaced with the same height skirting, the floor level will be 15-20mm higher so the skirting will now cover over any damage to plaster even if it was at the top of the skirting.


    If big chunks came out, just patch with a one coat plaster before putting the skirting back.


    Yes, the skirting must come off before you do the floor as you will need to pull the lengths away from the wall to remove it.
    Compensations/Refunds from Banks & Institutions - 4,165 | Stooz Profits - 7,636 | Quidco - 4,014

    All with a big thank you to Martin and MSE.com from Mutton Geoff!
    • dhokes
    • By dhokes 3rd Apr 18, 6:49 PM
    • 160 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    dhokes
    • #9
    • 3rd Apr 18, 6:49 PM
    • #9
    • 3rd Apr 18, 6:49 PM
    I would ask for a snagging visit after 6 months as well. Two years is a long time to wait for a handful of niggly things to be put right.


    The order of flooring/cupboards depends on what the bottom of your cupboards looks like and how big they are. If they have a bottom shelf and you can't see the floor, there is no point wasting money on expensive flooring where you can't see it. On the other hand, are the bottom kick panels trimmed/scribed in like a kitchen? If so, you want the flooring to run a little way under so you don't have any trim fitted to hide the cut edge of the floor.


    Finally, if the footprint of the cupboard space is small, then you might as well just fit flooring up to the wall and let the cupboards sit on top. That way if you change your mind and take them out, you won't have to redo the flooring.


    If it's a new build, I'd highly recommend taking the skirting off and refitting it (or something better) after the floor goes down as those beads around the edge of the room always look naff (in my opinion). Developers often use the cheapest skirting (ie plain timber) when you can buy primed mdf skirting in loads of designs (Torus and Ogee the most common) for about 1 a metre from your local builders merchant.
    Originally posted by Mutton Geoff
    So I'm thinking of removing the skirting boards, getting the cupboards fitted and then the wooden flooring. Would I need beading where the flooring meets the cupboards or what would be the alternative options?
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 3rd Apr 18, 9:42 PM
    • 25,202 Posts
    • 68,808 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    So I'm thinking of removing the skirting boards, getting the cupboards fitted and then the wooden flooring. Would I need beading where the flooring meets the cupboards or what would be the alternative options?
    Originally posted by dhokes
    The alternative is to remove skirting, fit floor, fit cupboards, fit new skirting. Makes sense, really. Neatest option if you have solid flooring.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • franklee
    • By franklee 3rd Apr 18, 10:27 PM
    • 3,693 Posts
    • 3,979 Thanks
    franklee
    Maybe I'm missing something here but given it's a new build can you ask the builder not to fit the skirting but just leave it for you. That way you won't have to remove it?
    • dhokes
    • By dhokes 4th Apr 18, 7:16 AM
    • 160 Posts
    • 16 Thanks
    dhokes
    Maybe I'm missing something here but given it's a new build can you ask the builder not to fit the skirting but just leave it for you. That way you won't have to remove it?
    Originally posted by franklee
    That would have been great however I've already asked them and they said they wouldn't be able to do that as then they wouldn't be able to receive a NHBC certificate.
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