Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Supergirl57
    • By Supergirl57 10th Feb 18, 3:19 PM
    • 4Posts
    • 2Thanks
    Supergirl57
    Medical records access
    • #1
    • 10th Feb 18, 3:19 PM
    Medical records access 10th Feb 18 at 3:19 PM
    I have worked for my employer for 7 years and have currently been signed off for 6 weeks following shoulder surgery. I have received a letter today from my employer's insurance provider requesting access to medical information via my gp. While I do not have anything to hide, I would have thought a valid sick note would be sufficient evidence signed by the consultant. It states that if I refuse they may not be able to process the claim. I am not aware of this happening with other employees and wondered if someone could advise if this jus usual.
Page 1
    • ssparks2003
    • By ssparks2003 10th Feb 18, 3:29 PM
    • 337 Posts
    • 447 Thanks
    ssparks2003
    • #2
    • 10th Feb 18, 3:29 PM
    • #2
    • 10th Feb 18, 3:29 PM
    Your companies insurance provider has defined this as their requirement, if you wish to be paid sick pay under this agreement then you have to comply. Should you not wish to claim via the insurance scheme or do not wish to provide access then that is wholly your choice and you can claim SSP. No one is forcing you, but if you want to claim you follow their rules.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 10th Feb 18, 4:15 PM
    • 6,570 Posts
    • 5,062 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #3
    • 10th Feb 18, 4:15 PM
    • #3
    • 10th Feb 18, 4:15 PM
    You need to ensure only relevant information is released from your GP and not your entire medical history from childhood.

    I would ask what they are looking for and why.
    • Supergirl57
    • By Supergirl57 10th Feb 18, 4:46 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Supergirl57
    • #4
    • 10th Feb 18, 4:46 PM
    • #4
    • 10th Feb 18, 4:46 PM
    Just to clarify, it is not me that has submitted a claim. I assume my employer is claiming on the school insurance to cover the costs of employing a replacement in my absence. I receive full pay from my employer and not SSP so this does not affect any monies paid to myself..
    • BorisThomson
    • By BorisThomson 10th Feb 18, 4:49 PM
    • 1,475 Posts
    • 3,090 Thanks
    BorisThomson
    • #5
    • 10th Feb 18, 4:49 PM
    • #5
    • 10th Feb 18, 4:49 PM
    Just to clarify, it is not me that has submitted a claim. I assume my employer is claiming on the school insurance to cover the costs of employing a replacement in my absence. I receive full pay from my employer and not SSP so this does not affect any monies paid to myself..
    Originally posted by Supergirl57
    Refusing to action a reasonable request would leave you open to disciplinary action.

    When you give consent you can specify that you wish to see the report before it is sent back. Do this so you can be sure the GP is only providing relevant information.
    • Supergirl57
    • By Supergirl57 10th Feb 18, 5:04 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Supergirl57
    • #6
    • 10th Feb 18, 5:04 PM
    • #6
    • 10th Feb 18, 5:04 PM
    Without wishing to sound rude,is a consultants sick note not reasonable evidence. I am rarely absent from work and think this is intrusive and not the norm.
    • Nicki
    • By Nicki 10th Feb 18, 5:12 PM
    • 7,714 Posts
    • 27,535 Thanks
    Nicki
    • #7
    • 10th Feb 18, 5:12 PM
    • #7
    • 10th Feb 18, 5:12 PM
    Without wishing to sound rude,is a consultants sick note not reasonable evidence. I am rarely absent from work and think this is intrusive and not the norm.
    Originally posted by Supergirl57
    No. and you're not looking at this in the correct way either.

    No one is doubting whether you are genuinely off ill. The school has submitted a claim to their insurers which if accepted means they will be compensated for the time off - i.e. they won't be out of pocket for the supply cover they need.

    If the claim is rejected by the insurers it doesn't mean that you were faking it, or that your claim isn't genuine, so you aren't at risk of a disciplinary over it. It just means that the school won't get paid by the insurers. You will still get your full pay.

    As the amount at issue is probably quite significant to the school in these days of much reduced budgets, I think you should allow this. The school itself won't see your medical report, just the insurers, and as others have said you can also ask to see it before it is sent and for material which is irrelevant to be edited out.
    • Supergirl57
    • By Supergirl57 10th Feb 18, 5:15 PM
    • 4 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Supergirl57
    • #8
    • 10th Feb 18, 5:15 PM
    • #8
    • 10th Feb 18, 5:15 PM
    Thank you. That makes more sense and puts matters into clearer perspective
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,371Posts Today

6,351Users online

Martin's Twitter