Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Exemplar
    • By Exemplar 10th Feb 18, 2:50 PM
    • 1,358Posts
    • 579Thanks
    Exemplar
    directunlocks.co.uk
    • #1
    • 10th Feb 18, 2:50 PM
    directunlocks.co.uk 10th Feb 18 at 2:50 PM
    OK - zipping up flame suit as should have known better..

    \rant
    I wanted to unlock an old phone to give to my son.

    Looked online and saw their site.

    Clicked through and it stated £12.99 and 2-3 days.

    Paid.

    Then get an email stating 'we need photographic ID within 10 minutes'.

    Luckily I have my passport scanned so sent it within their timeframe.

    Get an email stating 'all OK and unlock will be sorted Saturday'.

    Get an email today stating:
    To release the unlock for your device which will be sent Over The Air using either 3G, WiFi or by connecting the iPhone to a computer running iTunes, please make the final unlocking payment, as stated prior to payment, of £62.00. Delivery to your iPhone takes 2-5 days, as soon as it has delivered we will email you.

    Your iPhone is a very expensive device and is subsidised by the carrier over the length of your contract, Vodafone require this additional unlocking fee to cover their potential loss of revenue. Some research on the internet of other unlocking sites will show you that our price is one of the lowest in the industry, and our timescale is certainly the fastest.

    So I emailed back with:

    The fee you have asked for is simply sharp practise and I will not accept this.

    The reason I used your company was because it stated £12.99 on the initial enquiry and it was 'allegedly' quicker than Vodafone. I have been on to the Vodafone UK website and they have stated that they can unlock the handset at no charge to me (process may take 7 days).

    There is no such thing as ' already incurred non-refundable checking charges' either, we both know this and unless you can prove these charges you will either please:

    1) Refund the £12.99 immediately
    2) Process the unlock at £12.99

    So next email is 'refund actioned'.

    So to summarise - they state a low price, charge you for their 'anti fraud checks' (sending them your details). Then ask for more money to action the unlock.

    I finally then went to the airtime companies website and they agreed to unlock FOC..

    Completely my fault that I got suckered in..

    /rant
    'Just because its on the internet don't believe it 100%'. Abraham Lincoln.
Page 2
    • DiXy
    • By DiXy 8th Jan 19, 7:05 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    DiXy
    Beware, this is a scam!
    They advertise an unlocking service for $17.99 specifically for my phone model and carrier. After I paid that, they wrote me saying that they have contacted my carrier with the details of my specific device, who told them that my device was indeed eligible. However, they asked for an additional $42 to unlock it (and no refund possible for the $17.99). I paid the additional amount, and a few days later they wrote me saying that they were not able to unlock the phone, and they would only refund the money if I sent them proof of purchase for my device. After I sent the proof of purchase, they replied that they will not reimburse the money, but only offer credit towards another unlock (which we already know does not work anyway).
    • alumende27
    • By alumende27 14th Jan 19, 9:48 PM
    • 357 Posts
    • 340 Thanks
    alumende27
    Unless things have changed in recent years the ONLY people who can unlock an iPhone are apple themselves or the carrier to whom the phone is locked. The unlocking is done on apples servers, and no company other than the carrier is authorised to submit unlocking requests.

    Therefore you can usually be assured that any third party offering an iPhone unlocking service are scammers.

    Most, if not all phone companies will unlock a phone for free or a minimal fee after an initial period of 6months to a year, and it should only take around 1 working day.
    • jonesMUFCforever
    • By jonesMUFCforever 14th Jan 19, 10:52 PM
    • 26,347 Posts
    • 13,519 Thanks
    jonesMUFCforever
    They advertise an unlocking service for $17.99 specifically for my phone model and carrier. After I paid that, they wrote me saying that they have contacted my carrier with the details of my specific device, who told them that my device was indeed eligible. However, they asked for an additional $42 to unlock it (and no refund possible for the $17.99). I paid the additional amount, and a few days later they wrote me saying that they were not able to unlock the phone, and they would only refund the money if I sent them proof of purchase for my device. After I sent the proof of purchase, they replied that they will not reimburse the money, but only offer credit towards another unlock (which we already know does not work anyway).
    Originally posted by DiXy
    Speak to your bank about charging back the transactions - for services not received?
    What goes around - comes around
    give lots and you will always receive lots
    • Bob by
    • By Bob by 31st Jan 19, 8:39 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Bob by
    This is a proper scam, when you are first at the order details page just before payment I can confirm there is no mention at all of any extra fees until after you have paid then they change what you're device will see, basically if you try and go through the ordering process again you see a different version of the website with the details of extra payments on the order page quite clearly, making you think you miss read it. I have reported this to action fraud and I am currently requesting a refund through the payment company Nochex that handled the payment (similar to PayPal) and I suggest everyone does the same, you are within your right as at a minimum the receipt doesn't match what they are making out you ordered. As a online consumer you have a massive amount of rights these days! They are also giving incentives for 5 star reviews.
    • OldDIYer
    • By OldDIYer 28th Apr 19, 3:36 PM
    • 102 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    OldDIYer
    Any luck with fraud claim?
    Is it worth pursuing fraud claim? I was conned too. Phone was unlocked but it cost 3 times original quote and took at least 3 times as long.
    • OldDIYer
    • By OldDIYer 28th Apr 19, 3:52 PM
    • 102 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    OldDIYer
    Review on Trust Pilot
    I doubt if I will get my £3 for leaving a review and they'll probably get it deleted for using offensive language.

    Deceptive Con

    They claim to unlock in 24 hours from £14.99. They charge £17.99 and after 24 hours ask for another £32 whick they say was made clear earlier. That's a lie and I have the screen shots to prove it! I had to send good money after bad as I was away and needed the unlock. So it costs 3 times their advertised price and takes at least 3 times as long. A con indeed.
    Last edited by OldDIYer; 28-04-2019 at 4:04 PM. Reason: typo
    • grayme-m
    • By grayme-m 29th Apr 19, 4:44 AM
    • 1,397 Posts
    • 870 Thanks
    grayme-m
    Have you considered asking your credit card company to do a charge back of the two extra payments (having shared all your evidence)?
    Toyota - 'Always a better way', avoid buying Toyota.
    • OldDIYer
    • By OldDIYer 1st May 19, 2:19 PM
    • 102 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    OldDIYer
    Have you considered asking your credit card company to do a charge back of the two extra payments (having shared all your evidence)?
    I've done that now, thanks.

    ASA say 'they are currently in discussions with the advertiser', which seems odd as they made a ruling against them on 25 July 2018: https://www.asa.org.uk/rulings/direct-unlocks-a18-447541.html

    It seems they are toothless. I thought they had greater powers. I've asked them a few more questions.
    • grayme-m
    • By grayme-m 2nd May 19, 6:33 AM
    • 1,397 Posts
    • 870 Thanks
    grayme-m
    That ASA ruling appears to miss the point for me.

    The issue isn't so much how many get the service for £12.99, but how you pay that, then are asked for more with the threat you've lost the initial £12.99.

    If you apply for a loan that could be 'from 3%', they don't send you the money then tell you you're locked into a loan at 7%.
    Toyota - 'Always a better way', avoid buying Toyota.
    • Brainteaser
    • By Brainteaser 18th Sep 19, 10:47 AM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    Brainteaser
    I had a similar experience, paid up front then secondary charges. I didn't pay but made a complaint to ASA, I saw they had made previous judgements against Direct Unlocks, this is their reply, early September 2019: Reported to ASA this is their reply:

    Thank you for contacting the ASA regarding Direct Unlocks, I am sorry to hear about your experience.

    Just to make you aware due to the number of complaints we’ve received about this company, and due to their unwillingness to co-operate with us, our Compliance Team have referred the matter to our legal backstop, Trading Standards.

    That says it all!!
    • OldDIYer
    • By OldDIYer 19th Sep 19, 12:57 PM
    • 102 Posts
    • 41 Thanks
    OldDIYer
    It does say it all - but what toothless enforcement - Direct Unlocks just carry on conning people with no action against them.
    • gargoyle666
    • By gargoyle666 3rd Dec 19, 5:41 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    gargoyle666
    Still scamming people
    While doing some research about unlocking an old iPhone 7 that I am planning to buy off eBay for a christmas present for my daughter I happened upon a webpage by SimplyFixIt.com which was falling over itself in recommending Direct Unlocks as the go to place for getting this done. So of course first thing I do is search DU for reviews and sure enough a mixed bag on TrustPilot left me wondering how genuine this company really was. The next page I looked at was here on the money saving expert forum and the truth of the matter was made perfectly clear. I won't be going near DU now of course but I was still perplexed by SimplyFixIt pushing the company so hard in their page explaining all the different ways to unlock your phone. I wonder are they receiving something from DU in exchange for their recommendation. I messaged SFI about what I learned about DU and am waiting to see if they reply to me. It has certainly tarnished SFI for me as I had always taken them at face value in the past but now I will certainly be more reluctant to trust them completely. I just thought I would let the Money Saving Expert community know that there is another culprit out there pushing people into using Direct Unlocks when they are clearly criminal. I don't get how they are still in business.
    • Jumblebumble
    • By Jumblebumble 6th Dec 19, 4:47 PM
    • 572 Posts
    • 224 Thanks
    Jumblebumble
    While doing some research about unlocking an old iPhone 7 that I am planning to buy off eBay for a christmas present for my daughter I happened upon a webpage by SimplyFixIt.com which was falling over itself in recommending Direct Unlocks as the go to place for getting this done. So of course first thing I do is search DU for reviews and sure enough a mixed bag on TrustPilot left me wondering how genuine this company really was. The next page I looked at was here on the money saving expert forum and the truth of the matter was made perfectly clear. I won't be going near DU now of course but I was still perplexed by SimplyFixIt pushing the company so hard in their page explaining all the different ways to unlock your phone. I wonder are they receiving something from DU in exchange for their recommendation. I messaged SFI about what I learned about DU and am waiting to see if they reply to me. It has certainly tarnished SFI for me as I had always taken them at face value in the past but now I will certainly be more reluctant to trust them completely. I just thought I would let the Money Saving Expert community know that there is another culprit out there pushing people into using Direct Unlocks when they are clearly criminal. I don't get how they are still in business.
    Originally posted by gargoyle666
    From Simplyfixits website tells you all you need to know
    SimplyFixIt will SuperCharge your computer so that it runs as fast as the day you got it.
    This is not possible as the PC's component are slowly burning out from day one
    • domquark
    • By domquark 9th Dec 19, 1:04 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    domquark
    Another victim!
    I got caught, believing SimplyFixIt that £17.99 was all I had to pay. I then got another bill for £32.99 (making a total of £50.98!). The second invoice was for a "Ready to Release" fee, which I did not pay. The phone used to belong to my Sister in law, so I knew the phone was fully paid up. I then got in contact with EE (which the phone was locked to), only to find out that they would unlock the phone for free (if my Sister in law called them), as it was out of contract!
    DU will give you the first invoice with the word "Total" beside the [£17.99] amount, leading you to believe that is all you have to pay.
    DU then send you the second invoice stating:


    "EE UK require this additional unlocking fee to cover their potential loss of revenue".


    This is not true, as EE unlocked the phone for free.


    Alas, finally, you can't trust the Trustpilot reviews, as if DU get a negative review, they just continually report it for breaking the posting rules - almost all of the bad reviews have "magically" disappeared from their website, leaving only the glowing ones!
    • JLHH
    • By JLHH 15th Jan 20, 2:41 PM
    • 1 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    JLHH
    Stay away
    Please be aware. they have a strategy with big font for 29 dollars and when you are going to pay . There are some small but small font size saying that it is going to be additional fees. On a cell phone is really hard to see for older people like me. The total is on big fonts but the extra fees are really really small.

    This strategy is a SCAM. I tried to contact them and they replied offering a voucher for the initial payment but they don't want to do a full refund.

    They are abusing of people and not making clear on their home page.

    At least at their home page when they advertise a $29 service, that's when they should also mention the extra fees.

    I suggest going with doctorsim.com It is cheaper and transparent.

    Stay away from this company
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

99Posts Today

1,570Users online

Martin's Twitter