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    • dizzyblnd
    • By dizzyblnd 9th Feb 18, 5:41 PM
    • 403Posts
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    dizzyblnd
    Subsidence
    • #1
    • 9th Feb 18, 5:41 PM
    Subsidence 9th Feb 18 at 5:41 PM
    Hi hope someone can help me.

    I'm buying a property and the search has revealed there was a subsidence issue due to a tree in 2003. The tree was removed and had superstructure repairs in 2004. Does this mean that the house is good to buy now? What's the chance of it happening again? How will it affect my buildings insurance?
    NST2018 mortgage-free wannabe #145
Page 1
    • Anglea
    • By Anglea 9th Feb 18, 5:56 PM
    • 7,034 Posts
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    Anglea
    • #2
    • 9th Feb 18, 5:56 PM
    • #2
    • 9th Feb 18, 5:56 PM
    I would be happy to know too because my parents can't re-insure their properly due to subsidence in their garage (which is set at a distance from the house) and every single insurer I've called said they're not interested. It's caused by a tree next door and they're thinking of demolishing the garage but I wondered if it still would cause a problem or not.

    • eddddy
    • By eddddy 9th Feb 18, 6:00 PM
    • 6,122 Posts
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    eddddy
    • #3
    • 9th Feb 18, 6:00 PM
    • #3
    • 9th Feb 18, 6:00 PM
    I'm buying a property and the search has revealed there was a subsidence issue due to a tree in 2003. The tree was removed and had superstructure repairs in 2004. Does this mean that the house is good to buy now? What's the chance of it happening again? How will it affect my buildings insurance?
    Originally posted by dizzyblnd
    The subsidence history will be an issue for a lot of insurers.

    But, for example, - when I last checked - AXA provide buildings insurance cover on normal terms where subsidence occurred over 10 years ago. And Legal & General will offer cover on normal terms after 15 years .


    Realistically, you might expect to pay a little less for a house with a subsidence history, because of the hassle with insurance.
    • treecol
    • By treecol 9th Feb 18, 6:15 PM
    • 266 Posts
    • 31 Thanks
    treecol
    • #4
    • 9th Feb 18, 6:15 PM
    • #4
    • 9th Feb 18, 6:15 PM
    I don't think this comment will help you but will add it in case it may. We have just walked away from a house that has subsidence due to heave after a tree was removed. The gable end of the house next door is also showing signs of movement. The house has had an endless stream of people to view it & all have walked away. We took our builder with us to do a 2nd viewing - he used to carry out building surveys, specialising is subsidence. He advised us to walk away, saying there are just too many complications that could arise in the future. He said unless the house was about 200k cheaper ( which it never would be) it just wouldn't be worth the future problems with resale, insurance - further complications after underpinning & the possibility of it reoccurring elsewhere in the building & the insurance excluding any future claims for subsidence.
    • dizzyblnd
    • By dizzyblnd 9th Feb 18, 6:37 PM
    • 403 Posts
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    dizzyblnd
    • #5
    • 9th Feb 18, 6:37 PM
    • #5
    • 9th Feb 18, 6:37 PM
    Thank you Eddddy and trecol. As it was over 14 years ago and there have been no problems since, is it likely to have recurring issues?
    NST2018 mortgage-free wannabe #145
    • PhilE
    • By PhilE 9th Feb 18, 6:54 PM
    • 280 Posts
    • 180 Thanks
    PhilE
    • #6
    • 9th Feb 18, 6:54 PM
    • #6
    • 9th Feb 18, 6:54 PM
    Presuming the repairs where done to the foundations, ie underpinning, this will increase the cost of insurance, affect the mortgage and therefore decrease the value of the property.

    This can be a bit ridiculous as a house that has been underpinned on clay soil due to subsidence, will probably be more secure than a house on the same street which hasn't been underpinned. However, thats the way the market goes.

    So the property your interested in may be completely fine, however it has lost some value.

    If its the home you want to live the rest of your life in, make a low offer and be prepared to pay more for insurance.

    If you may want to sell it later, or pass on a property of value to your children, I'd forget it. Not worth the hassle.
    • cjdavies
    • By cjdavies 10th Feb 18, 7:27 AM
    • 3,226 Posts
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    cjdavies
    • #7
    • 10th Feb 18, 7:27 AM
    • #7
    • 10th Feb 18, 7:27 AM
    Get quotes on insurance before exchange to have an idea.
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 10th Feb 18, 10:21 AM
    • 9,034 Posts
    • 9,929 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    • #8
    • 10th Feb 18, 10:21 AM
    • #8
    • 10th Feb 18, 10:21 AM
    Hi hope someone can help me.

    I'm buying a property and the search has revealed there was a subsidence issue due to a tree in 2003. The tree was removed and had superstructure repairs in 2004. Does this mean that the house is good to buy now? What's the chance of it happening again? How will it affect my buildings insurance?
    Originally posted by dizzyblnd
    Are you planning to plant another tree in the same place?
    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 11th Feb 18, 1:18 AM
    • 1,946 Posts
    • 1,280 Thanks
    Tom99
    • #9
    • 11th Feb 18, 1:18 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Feb 18, 1:18 AM
    Do you have full details of the claim and also a specification of any building work carried out? The property may not have been underpinned only the tree removed and the walls monitored for future movement for a while.
    With that information in hand get an insurance quote and make sure in detail what future subsidence would be covered and what the excess will be.
    • dizzyblnd
    • By dizzyblnd 11th Feb 18, 4:03 PM
    • 403 Posts
    • 3,653 Thanks
    dizzyblnd
    Thank CJDavies and Tom99. That's really helpful- going to request all those things then see.

    AnotherJoe- no I don't plan on planting any trees.
    NST2018 mortgage-free wannabe #145
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 11th Feb 18, 6:53 PM
    • 5,141 Posts
    • 23,586 Thanks
    Slinky
    It's caused by a tree next door and they're thinking of demolishing the garage but I wondered if it still would cause a problem or not.
    Originally posted by Anglea
    Yes unfortunately the property will probably still carry a subsidence marker even if the garage is demolished.

    It does get easier to insure properties as time goes by. We've just bought one where the single storey extension was underpinned 27 years ago and have got just the normal 1K excess for subsidence because it was over 25 years.

    Try speaking to a broker. We have cover with Vasek.
    • Anglea
    • By Anglea 18th Feb 18, 8:23 PM
    • 7,034 Posts
    • 17,272 Thanks
    Anglea
    Yes unfortunately the property will probably still carry a subsidence marker even if the garage is demolished.

    It does get easier to insure properties as time goes by. We've just bought one where the single storey extension was underpinned 27 years ago and have got just the normal 1K excess for subsidence because it was over 25 years.

    Try speaking to a broker. We have cover with Vasek.
    Originally posted by Slinky
    Thanks for that name, I'm going to contact them next week. I've been to various brokers and no one they tried for me were interested.

    • Tom99
    • By Tom99 19th Feb 18, 4:52 AM
    • 1,946 Posts
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    Tom99
    Thanks for that name, I'm going to contact them next week. I've been to various brokers and no one they tried for me were interested.
    Originally posted by Anglea
    Get the name of the current insurer and ask them. I believe insurance co's have a general understanding to offer cover to a person buying a property like this.
    Also ask the vendors to confirm they have subsidence cover and what the excess is.
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 19th Feb 18, 10:09 AM
    • 5,141 Posts
    • 23,586 Thanks
    Slinky
    Thanks for that name, I'm going to contact them next week. I've been to various brokers and no one they tried for me were interested.
    Originally posted by Anglea
    My insurance with Vasek was arranged by James & Lindsay in Colchester.
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