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  • FIRST POST
    • phizzimum
    • By phizzimum 8th Feb 18, 8:50 AM
    • 1,693Posts
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    phizzimum
    Back In time For Tea
    • #1
    • 8th Feb 18, 8:50 AM
    Back In time For Tea 8th Feb 18 at 8:50 AM
    Did anyone else watch Back In Time For Tea on the BBC this week?

    Itís the same format as Back In Time For Dinner but focusing on the diet of working class families in the North.

    This week they took the family from 1918 to 1939
    weaving through the chaos...
Page 2
    • caronc
    • By caronc 8th Feb 18, 5:05 PM
    • 3,620 Posts
    • 23,638 Thanks
    caronc
    You find all/any old censuses .... and slowly pick out a list of who lived there, then hit the online newspapers and find out stuff about them ... and use the newspapers with the address for a match.

    Then use Google ... and local archives online searches ....

    In the 3rd hour you .....

    By the 5th hour I'd know all the neighbours' names and their business .... maybe who the house dwellers' friends were ...and I'd have got the outline of all the family trees of everybody who lived in the house ....



    I'd be looking for scandals too ..... did anybody who lived in that house ever do something really naughty
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    As far as I can see the last census that has been released in Scotland was 1911, the house wasn't built then so nothing to track unfortunately.
    GC - Jan18 £55/£120, Feb18 £68/£120, Mar £104/£150, Apr £164/£200
    GC YTD - £391/£590
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 8th Feb 18, 5:05 PM
    • 15,755 Posts
    • 133,843 Thanks
    JackieO
    As a child my late Mum cooked tripe with onions, and it was as revolting as it looked on the programme, but during the austerity of post war Britain you ate what was put in front of you, or went hungry.

    Rationing was around until 1954 so being 'picky' wasn't an option. I think the bacon roly poly would have been better if it was baked rather than boiled, the cloth looked slightly more appealing than the pudding.

    On the 1911 census in Scotland for my grandmother's house she was down as widowed with five children under 14 plus two lodgers !!

    The lodgers were probably her main source of income She lived in what was called a Butt 'n' Ben cottage, with no inside sanitation ,electric light or running water. Just an outhouse and a pump in the well in the garden.

    She was confined to a wheelchair after the birth of her last baby son in 1890 and as I remember my late Dad saying she slept in it as well.

    As soon as the children were old enough they were sent out into the world to make their own way My Dad's older brother David went to the USA and another one William, went to Canada, and a sister May, to Australia. She had a very hard life with a total of 7 of her own children and 6 step children from when she married my Granddad in 1883.

    He died in 1897 leaving her almost penniless. no social security as a blanket to help out in those days )

    My own Dad left home at 10 and was apprenticed to a chap in Glasgow, who he had previously worked after school for in his home town of Brechin from the age of 8 .This man had decided to move to Glasgow with his wife, and askedmy Grandma if he could take my Dad with him, he taught my Dad all he knew and put him through his training in Glasgow to become a qualified chemist.
    My Dad always said it was the best thing his Mum did for him as it got him away from the local linen mills which would have been his only option back in those days .

    I agree watching the programme it seems to have been a bit rushed and perhaps a bit more detail would have made it better .

    The family were lovely though and the girls quite willing to give Mum a hand, and the young lad is lovely and his smile brightens up everyone .The Mum is pretty good and a lot less complaining than the other one in the previous programme.At least she know how to use a tin opener

    I look forward to seeing how they get on with the rationing

    JackieO xx
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus.
    2018 Food spend so far this year Three months totals £96.53 April £8.98 . this morning short shop was 5.62 only bought essentials
    • Farway
    • By Farway 8th Feb 18, 5:19 PM
    • 6,094 Posts
    • 9,557 Thanks
    Farway
    As far as I can see the last census that has been released in Scotland was 1911, the house wasn't built then so nothing to track unfortunately.
    Originally posted by caronc
    There is a 1939 register, compiled when war was expected, so the government knew who was where & what skills they did or did not have

    This register went on to be the basis of the NHS register
    Some names and details are redacted because of this
    You local library may be able to access this, via Find My Past
    • caronc
    • By caronc 8th Feb 18, 5:39 PM
    • 3,620 Posts
    • 23,638 Thanks
    caronc
    There is a 1939 register, compiled when war was expected, so the government knew who was where & what skills they did or did not have

    This register went on to be the basis of the NHS register
    Some names and details are redacted because of this
    You local library may be able to access this, via Find My Past
    Originally posted by Farway
    I think (though I'm not sure) that Scotland has only published up to 1911 census as they lock records of 100 years. Parish registers would an option but they aren't online and held at a location I can't get to
    GC - Jan18 £55/£120, Feb18 £68/£120, Mar £104/£150, Apr £164/£200
    GC YTD - £391/£590
    • midnightraven3
    • By midnightraven3 8th Feb 18, 7:53 PM
    • 2,747 Posts
    • 6,673 Thanks
    midnightraven3
    I was surprised the 15/16 year old daughter didnt know how to peel an onion
    and who knew everyone had the giant "pasta maker" in their backyard

    The mum in this one is much better than the previous one
    I am looking forward to next weeks
    • blackcatsx2
    • By blackcatsx2 8th Feb 18, 9:19 PM
    • 114 Posts
    • 1,154 Thanks
    blackcatsx2
    I laughed at the pasta maker too! Iím also looking forward to next week and watching them cooking with rations.
    • phizzimum
    • By phizzimum 9th Feb 18, 7:33 AM
    • 1,693 Posts
    • 9,244 Thanks
    phizzimum
    I have teenage girls and I was relieved that they did know what a mangle was - but only because Iíve pointed them out when weíve visited historic buildings and told them that I remember my grandparents using one.

    But I discovered yesterday that my girls didnít know about postmarks. My youngest was puzzled that I knew where in the country a letter had been posted before Iíd opened it. She very rarely gets post and Iíd never thought to explain it before.

    They can both peel and chop an onion though!
    weaving through the chaos...
    • JackieO
    • By JackieO 9th Feb 18, 10:04 AM
    • 15,755 Posts
    • 133,843 Thanks
    JackieO
    re the post one of my grandsons Jack, who is a very bright almost 18 year old in his second year of 'A' levels actually asked me where he could buy a stamp as he wanted to post an appliction for a provisional driving licence off.

    I started to laugh, until I realised that he and most of his contemporaries would perhaps have never posted a letter to anyone, as its all emails and texts and he certainly rarely gets mail
    Quot Libros,Quam Breve Tempus.
    2018 Food spend so far this year Three months totals £96.53 April £8.98 . this morning short shop was 5.62 only bought essentials
    • thorsoak
    • By thorsoak 9th Feb 18, 10:23 AM
    • 5,618 Posts
    • 25,631 Thanks
    thorsoak
    My MiL grew up as the youngest child of 6 (suspect that she might have been the daughter of eldest daughter who was aged 21 when she was born, but that is conjecture) in 1911. Her father was a farm labourer in Wiltshire and her three brothers all lived at home, as did eldest daughter. Second daughter (born 1900) was already away in Bognor Regis as a skivvy maid in 1912 - she should have been in education until 13 but had a "certificate of leaving" dated 1912. One of her brothers volunteered (and lied about his age) in 1914 and the lack of his earnings into the cottage was a cause of concern to the family. Eldest sister married in 1915 and left the home and the other two brothers were called up during WW1. When MiL was 13, she too went to work locally for the "big family" - and cried when she found that there was running water in the kitchen! She actually worked her way up through the kitchen and various employers and when she married at 28 she was one of the head cooks at a castle!

    The cottage in which they lived was a tiny thatched cottage where the rats would run through the thatch. It was a very pretty village - and that cottage recently changed hands at £750,000!

    After that upbringing - and that of FiL who was one of 13 children, is there any wonder that they only had one child?
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 9th Feb 18, 1:40 PM
    • 62,178 Posts
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    PasturesNew

    After that upbringing - and that of FiL who was one of 13 children, is there any wonder that they only had one child?
    Originally posted by thorsoak
    Back then you didn't have a choice though.

    If you had sex, there was a chance you were pregnant. Few used/had access to the old fashioned rubbery bags that passed as condoms. AND ... even if they had the access to them and the cash for them, there was still the embarrassment factor as they'd have to go into the shop to buy them face to face from people they knew.

    After that, it's a question of whether you can carry one to full term.

    With only one child it would indicate that either him/her weren't having any sex ... maybe they even split up but the records don't show it ... and one just "assumes" people stayed together...

    Or maybe she couldn't get pregnant, or couldn't carry to full term, perpetually losing them.

    He probably wasn't shooting blanks as he produced one, but might have a low sperm count.

    Apart from that, there was just syphilis - you can sometimes spot this in families if there's a gap between living children of about 10 years, which is the clearance time ... you'd expect to see miscarriages, stillborn babies, then maybe babies who died very young, then possibly some with disabilities - after about 10 years you would then probably have a live baby without problems.

    You couldn't choose though. No reliable/decent/accessible contraception until the 1960s.
    Last edited by PasturesNew; 09-02-2018 at 1:42 PM.
    • thorsoak
    • By thorsoak 9th Feb 18, 4:15 PM
    • 5,618 Posts
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    thorsoak
    No, they didn't split up, no, there were no miscarriages/babies not carried until fullterm. There was, however WWII, and FiL was in the navy and went to sea when OH was 12 days old, saw him again when he was nearly 5 years old! Not that unusual. By which time MiL would have been 36 - and, remembering the childhood backgrounds of MiL and FiL when malnutrition could well have a contributory factor.

    And knowing both of them, and their ethics, syphilis would certainly not be a factor, even though FiL was in the navy!
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 9th Feb 18, 8:47 PM
    • 7,945 Posts
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    Owain Moneysaver
    re the post one of my grandsons Jack, who is a very bright almost 18 year old in his second year of 'A' levels actually asked me where he could buy a stamp as he wanted to post an appliction for a provisional driving licence off.
    Originally posted by JackieO
    Remember how exciting it was the first time you could buy stamps from shops instead of having to go to the Post Office!
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • Uniscots97
    • By Uniscots97 10th Feb 18, 10:26 AM
    • 6,217 Posts
    • 23,750 Thanks
    Uniscots97
    I was really looking forward to the program until I saw who's presenting it. Sorry but her manner isnt suited to a show of this type, she's too jokey.

    Are they also missing out years? I don't remember it being so rushed before
    Last edited by Uniscots97; 10-02-2018 at 10:36 AM.
    CC2 = £8687.86 (£10000 )CC1 = £0 (£9983 ); Reusing shopping bags savings =£5.60 vs spent £0.90 .Wine is like opera. You can enjoy it even if you don't understand it and too much can give you a headache the next day J
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 10th Feb 18, 11:45 AM
    • 10,871 Posts
    • 28,902 Thanks
    suki1964
    They partioned the house to make it smaller, first words were " omg how small the kitchen is now"

    Way too rushed for me as I love social history programmes and doing a year a day just didn't see the real struggle. All well and good putting your possessions in a hand cart and hiding them , but they got them back the following day so we never saw the struggle, or heard their thoughts

    Whilst this mum is lovely, I don't think you can compare her to Rochelle. This mum is going hungry for a day, not a week as in the original series

    Rochelle, whilst I know annoyed so many viewers here with her inability to cook or use a can opener, at least took on how life was so very different for women and how lucky her generation has been
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 10th Feb 18, 12:01 PM
    • 62,178 Posts
    • 363,938 Thanks
    PasturesNew

    Are they also missing out years? I don't remember it being so rushed before
    Originally posted by Uniscots97
    Yes, they just ripped the calendar and announced: 1919, 1921, 1925, 1928, 1931, 1934, 1937, 1939.

    Everything else was skimped/rushed too, with little outside of the house, mostly just "here's the dinner they might've eaten this year" and a little voiceover of the changes going on in the country at the time and how that might've affected the household and a tiny smattering of pastimes/activities.
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 10th Feb 18, 1:49 PM
    • 15,352 Posts
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    moneyistooshorttomention
    I get that people are finding it "rushed" compared to the original series.

    We were told that the family in the original series were supposed to be middle class and they were giving them the middle class lifestyle/possessions.

    This family are being given working class lifestyle/possessions - and I'd hazard a guess that change doesnt happen nearly so fast (well didnt in past decades anyway I assume) for poorer people. Whereas middle class are more likely to have the money to be "early adopters" of different lifestyles/more modern possessions/etc and I would think it likely that even the difference of a year might mark a noticeable difference in possessions/way of living for better-off etc people, but would make very little difference to poorer people - even before the age of first tv/then Internet telling people what "the latest" is iyswim.
    Last edited by moneyistooshorttomention; 10-02-2018 at 1:52 PM.
    Fastest way to get a headache = try and make someone that thinks for themselves conform to local "group think"
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