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  • FIRST POST
    • phizzimum
    • By phizzimum 8th Feb 18, 8:50 AM
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    phizzimum
    Back In time For Tea
    • #1
    • 8th Feb 18, 8:50 AM
    Back In time For Tea 8th Feb 18 at 8:50 AM
    Did anyone else watch Back In Time For Tea on the BBC this week?

    Itís the same format as Back In Time For Dinner but focusing on the diet of working class families in the North.

    This week they took the family from 1918 to 1939
    weaving through the chaos...
Page 1
    • Farway
    • By Farway 8th Feb 18, 9:01 AM
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    Farway
    • #2
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:01 AM
    • #2
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:01 AM
    I watched, seemed a bit rushed from the previous format, not a lot of background details.

    The oft repeated "Northern grit" also got on my nerves
    • nanto3girls
    • By nanto3girls 8th Feb 18, 9:03 AM
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    nanto3girls
    • #3
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:03 AM
    • #3
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:03 AM
    I watched it. it was interesting.


    The bacon,onion and suet roly poly looked gross.
    • lucyhope
    • By lucyhope 8th Feb 18, 9:41 AM
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    lucyhope
    • #4
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:41 AM
    • #4
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:41 AM
    I watched it and really enjoyed it (a northener!) The Mum seemed more clued up regarding cooking as the Mum in Back In Time for Dinner, and the family seemed to enjoy it more. I agree nanto3girls the roly poly did look gross, I've never had it but my OH said he did as a child and it tasted as gross as it looked! Tripe is absolutly NOT on my bucket list of foods to try though, I would rather have gone hungry.
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    • Siebrie
    • By Siebrie 8th Feb 18, 9:49 AM
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    Siebrie
    • #5
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:49 AM
    • #5
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:49 AM
    I'm Dutch and I really enjoy these 'Back in Time for ...' series. This family seems lovely, lots of laughter and working together.
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    • phizzimum
    • By phizzimum 8th Feb 18, 9:56 AM
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    phizzimum
    • #6
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:56 AM
    • #6
    • 8th Feb 18, 9:56 AM
    I thought that too Farway - didnt they take it a year at a time before?

    The only time I made rolypoly pudding it was a slimy mess too!
    weaving through the chaos...
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 8th Feb 18, 10:01 AM
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    PasturesNew
    • #7
    • 8th Feb 18, 10:01 AM
    • #7
    • 8th Feb 18, 10:01 AM
    I watched it. It was a more rushed format, without further lifestyle detailing that the FBINFD series showed.

    I was surprised that they had a whole house to themselves and it was quite "lower middle class" looking to me. I bet the real working class were living in smaller grotty houses and without so many of the extras in life, like getting a radio so early, or cupboards full of branded goods.

    As for the bacon/onion roly poly, that should've been steamed to be better than it was.

    They did say that men and women worked full-time and the woman still had to come home and do all the shopping/cooking. What they didn't say was that she'd have probably had some help from children collecting groceries, or grocery boys delivering groceries, or family/neighbours helping out. Back then I bet your sister lived 2 doors up, brother 3 doors down, aunt across the road, gran round the corner, other uncle 2 streets away .... and there was a lot more "mucking in" as everybody was local and so they'd have had a lot more inter-dependence for borrowing things, doing things for each other, collecting/delivering things etc.

    We weren't northerners, but I know my mum (brought up by her gran, as was her cousin) had her aunt/cousins living next door, her mother/step-father/kids living round the corner, 6 other uncles/aunts living within one mile, 6 great aunts living within half a mile, 6 more a mile away .... and all their families of 6-8 kids in the area too working/passing and available for errands. If you stepped outside the door, too, all the neighbours had lived in the houses 20-30 years so you knew all of them and their kids and their relations (who were probably related as your grandfather's sister married their granny).

    Everybody used to run errands back then for everybody else, it's how you lived and got things done. "Run this down to ..." "Go and pick up...."

    My mum used to run the pies across to the bakehouse for her aunts/gran and then pick them up as they didn't have an oven.
    Last edited by PasturesNew; 08-02-2018 at 10:06 AM.
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 8th Feb 18, 10:04 AM
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    Owain Moneysaver
    • #8
    • 8th Feb 18, 10:04 AM
    • #8
    • 8th Feb 18, 10:04 AM
    I liked tripe and onions as a child, and that roly poly should have been steamed not boiled.

    That's not a pasta maker, that's a mangle.
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
    • blackcatsx2
    • By blackcatsx2 8th Feb 18, 11:15 AM
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    blackcatsx2
    • #9
    • 8th Feb 18, 11:15 AM
    • #9
    • 8th Feb 18, 11:15 AM
    I enjoyed it too and I thought the family were very nice with a sense of fun but some attempt to understand how tough times could be. The format didnít really allow enough time for the bigger context to be explored - we didnít see how busy a mum would be just keeping the family fed and clothed.
    I felt it sort of implied that it was tough in the north but much, much easier in the south which is probably not completely accurate.
    Iíd rather have had the roly poly than the tripe or the rabbit!
    • Floss
    • By Floss 8th Feb 18, 11:51 AM
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    Floss
    The family were working class this time, so experienced being on the Dole and being means tested.

    Their home was typical of 10% housing costs - 2 up, 2 down - as can be seen at Beamish, St Fagans or Ironbridge museums. Front room with 2 chairs, a clippy rug, grandma's china dogs & grandfather's clock, a back kitchen & privy.

    I guess things like no local jobs for the girls during the Depression, and 40% unemployment in Durham were things that would not have been on the radar of the middle class southern family with their (northern) domestic servant.
    • skintmumof3
    • By skintmumof3 8th Feb 18, 12:45 PM
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    skintmumof3
    This programme irked me a little as it was no different for the working classes down south.....the depression hit everywhere
    Two up/down houses were the norm, my grandmother was sent up to Cheshire (from Swindon) to enter into service at the age of 14.., tales of my grandad having to put newspaper in his shoes when they had holes in, having little food on the table etc. Southern grit existed exactly the same as northern grit also everybody rallying around with close knit communites.....my family hail from the Swindon area and things for the working classes were exactly the same..........tough!!!
    For a social history programme I felt this was a little biased.....
    Last edited by skintmumof3; 08-02-2018 at 12:48 PM.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 8th Feb 18, 1:34 PM
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    PasturesNew
    Re 2-up-2-down, their house wasn't on the "very small" scale of things.

    The show also failed to explain how everybody slept as they had a mix of girls/boy and parents in what'd have been a 2 bed house... and where's the tin bath?

    I just looked up where my mum was living - it was part of the slum clearance in the mid 1930s and they moved into a newly built social housing house. I know how many rooms it had from the 1911 Census and they had 4 rooms, so 2up-2down. In 1925 the house contained:

    Husband/wife (both aged 45)
    7 children and one grandchild aged:
    Son/24, Son/23,
    Daughter/20 & baby/1, Daughter/15,
    Son/12, Son/7, Son/4.

    Within 2-3 years one of those adult sons married and left, one daughter left without her baby and the other daughter produced two more babies, making 2 adults, 5 children aged 7-26 and 3 grandchildren.

    They were lucky to get a 4-bed "council house" ~1933-35 to house that lot - a decent home to live in ready for when the War started.
    • caronc
    • By caronc 8th Feb 18, 1:55 PM
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    caronc
    My house was originally a tied workers house. It was built in 1927 and had three rooms plus a scullery and bathroom. The original layout was front parlour complete with cornice and ceiling rose. Most likely kept for best. A bedroom and a living room/kitchen complete with range and a bed recess. These quite often had trestle bed underneath that a young child could use. Mum and Dad would have used the recess and any kids regardless age/sex the bedroom. When we bought the place it still had original bathroom complete with (disconnected) gas geysers about the bath & sink. I've not checked the census but as larger families were the norm I would imagine a fairly number of people lived here.
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    • CapricornLass
    • By CapricornLass 8th Feb 18, 3:26 PM
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    CapricornLass
    I also got irritated by the casual assumption that it was all much easier in the South. Maybe in London it was, but if you lived in the country and from a working class background, it wasn't necessarily easier. True you could often grow some veg in your back garden, or poach some rabbits or forage from the hedgerows, but it wasn't easy to get jobs to earn a wage, what jobs there were were often very low-paid, and not necessarily the public transport to get you to local towns either. (Still the case . In fact, there was better public transport from my mum's village in the 1930s than there is now!).

    That roly-poly pastry should have been much stiffer. The cloth that it was boiled in should also have been thickly coated with flourprior to putting the pudding in, and after it was cooked, then it should have been unwrapped put in the range oven to dry off and colour for 20 mins or so.

    Hubby (ex-Salford lad born in Ordsall in the 1950s) thought that their house was posh. It certainly seemed very large! But also nice to see that they had found someone who seemed to have some idea to cook - and daughters who were more willing to pitch in!
    Sealed Pot Challenge no 265.
    • skintmumof3
    • By skintmumof3 8th Feb 18, 3:35 PM
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    skintmumof3
    when my mums` dad died in 1939, they were living in a tied cottage, he was a farm labourer, my grandmother and mum were evicted with the first week as the farmer had another worker to move in....no social security back then and totally relied on goodwill of relatives and friends..and no compassion from the farmer at all......and this was in Berkshire......x
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 8th Feb 18, 3:37 PM
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    PasturesNew
    I've not checked the census ...
    Originally posted by caronc
    Go and do it now ... we'll sit and wait.

    I'd have done that after I'd offered on the house and before I'd got the keys!!
    • caronc
    • By caronc 8th Feb 18, 4:12 PM
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    caronc
    Go and do it now ... we'll sit and wait.

    I'd have done that after I'd offered on the house and before I'd got the keys!!
    Originally posted by PasturesNew
    I'm not sure how to

    ETA - it would seem (as far as I can tell) the 1931 census for Scotland hasn't been released
    Last edited by caronc; 08-02-2018 at 4:18 PM.
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    GC YTD 2018- £605/£940
    • MrsLurcherwalker
    • By MrsLurcherwalker 8th Feb 18, 4:13 PM
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    MrsLurcherwalker
    I was never more aware of the North/South divide until watching the first of these programmes and the question 'do they eat pie down south?' was absurdity! Why on earth wouldn't we eat pie 'down south'? what do people THINK we eat??? earthworms? We are one nation not two different tribes in competition with each other, c'mon TV producers don't make bigger divisions between people!
    Thumpers mum was right - if you can't find anything nice to say don't say anything at all!
    • purpleybat
    • By purpleybat 8th Feb 18, 4:27 PM
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    purpleybat
    I watched it. it was interesting.


    The bacon,onion and suet roly poly looked gross.
    Originally posted by nanto3girls

    I've not seen the programme yet but I make a version of this and it's very tasty. I would imagine i'm a bit more generous with the fillings than the original recipe.
    I shall have to watch now to compare
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    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 8th Feb 18, 4:53 PM
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    PasturesNew
    I'm not sure how to

    ETA - it would seem (as far as I can tell) the 1931 census for Scotland hasn't been released
    Originally posted by caronc
    You find all/any old censuses .... and slowly pick out a list of who lived there, then hit the online newspapers and find out stuff about them ... and use the newspapers with the address for a match.

    Then use Google ... and local archives online searches ....

    In the 3rd hour you .....

    By the 5th hour I'd know all the neighbours' names and their business .... maybe who the house dwellers' friends were ...and I'd have got the outline of all the family trees of everybody who lived in the house ....



    I'd be looking for scandals too ..... did anybody who lived in that house ever do something really naughty
    Last edited by PasturesNew; 08-02-2018 at 4:56 PM.
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