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  • FIRST POST
    • MikeEngTech
    • By MikeEngTech 8th Feb 18, 2:14 AM
    • 47Posts
    • 12Thanks
    MikeEngTech
    Plastering Victorian house
    • #1
    • 8th Feb 18, 2:14 AM
    Plastering Victorian house 8th Feb 18 at 2:14 AM
    Hi,
    Ivee asked 3 builders and everyone wants to use plasterboard and multifinish.
    Would you say I need to use lime plaster for breathability? Will I need air bricks?
    Itís a brick, cavity, brick construction.
    Also need to brick up the old external door in the kitchen and they want to use aerated block on the inside then plasterboard and skim as usual.
    Planning on staying for a long time. Might not be able to afford a life plaster job but I at least would like to understand the pros and cons more.
Page 1
    • Doozergirl
    • By Doozergirl 8th Feb 18, 6:44 AM
    • 25,198 Posts
    • 68,805 Thanks
    Doozergirl
    • #2
    • 8th Feb 18, 6:44 AM
    • #2
    • 8th Feb 18, 6:44 AM
    It would be pretty unusual for a Victorian house to be of cavity construction?

    I!!!8217;d say that lime plaster would be less important with cavity construction as its purpose is to prevent damp but I think you need to be sure that it is both cavity and Victorian.

    Lime plaster is more flexible (houses move, especially old ones) and yes, breathable for dampness to evaporate better. It would certainly be better if you are able to skim over existing lime plaster on external walls with like. Solid construction external walls with lime plaster would also be preferable. They do get cold and liable to condensation more than damp. If you!!!8217;re going back to brick then you may have to put insulated plasterboard on the walls anyway to meet building regs.

    Air bricks are important for the sub floor below joists. I am not sure why you!!!8217;ve included that question with plastering. Are you just talking about vents above the floor?
    Last edited by Doozergirl; 08-02-2018 at 6:49 AM.
    Everything that is supposed to be in heaven is already here on earth.
    • MikeEngTech
    • By MikeEngTech 8th Feb 18, 8:10 AM
    • 47 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    MikeEngTech
    • #3
    • 8th Feb 18, 8:10 AM
    • #3
    • 8th Feb 18, 8:10 AM
    Yes had full survey and engineer estimated house to be 1890 and said cavity, he area is known for it and I know it!!!8217;s rare.
    Only mentioned the air bricks to help it breath if covering it on plasterboar as a builder said this when I asked about lime. Thanks.
    • martinsurrey
    • By martinsurrey 9th Feb 18, 8:46 AM
    • 3,340 Posts
    • 4,092 Thanks
    martinsurrey
    • #4
    • 9th Feb 18, 8:46 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Feb 18, 8:46 AM
    It would be pretty unusual for a Victorian house to be of cavity construction?

    I!!!8217;d say that lime plaster would be less important with cavity construction as its purpose is to prevent damp but I think you need to be sure that it is both cavity and Victorian.

    Lime plaster is more flexible (houses move, especially old ones) and yes, breathable for dampness to evaporate better. It would certainly be better if you are able to skim over existing lime plaster on external walls with like. Solid construction external walls with lime plaster would also be preferable. They do get cold and liable to condensation more than damp. If you!!!8217;re going back to brick then you may have to put insulated plasterboard on the walls anyway to meet building regs.

    Air bricks are important for the sub floor below joists. I am not sure why you!!!8217;ve included that question with plastering. Are you just talking about vents above the floor?
    Originally posted by Doozergirl
    I lived in an 1888 built house that was cavity ground floor, and solid wall upstairs, a very strange configuration, but not uncommon in my neck of the woods.
    • MikeEngTech
    • By MikeEngTech 11th Feb 18, 12:58 AM
    • 47 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    MikeEngTech
    • #5
    • 11th Feb 18, 12:58 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Feb 18, 12:58 AM
    Any more thoughts? Just that all builders want to use aerated block, plasterboard and multifinish any chance they get and I'm not sure. I can just imagine damp trapped and a big agro.
    • konark
    • By konark 11th Feb 18, 1:38 AM
    • 1,010 Posts
    • 776 Thanks
    konark
    • #6
    • 11th Feb 18, 1:38 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Feb 18, 1:38 AM
    The builders want to use blocks and plasterboard and gypsum plaster because its cheap, easy and it's all many of them know. What would you want them to block up the door with? Bricks are expensive and time-consuming to lay.

    On a late Victorian house with cavity walls I'd say don't bother with lime-plaster- it's more for 200-year-old country cottages. Not that you'll find a builder willing to use it or even knows what it is, but hey a bit of breezeblock smeared with gypsum, now that's a thing of beauty!
    • MikeEngTech
    • By MikeEngTech 11th Feb 18, 1:48 AM
    • 47 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    MikeEngTech
    • #7
    • 11th Feb 18, 1:48 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Feb 18, 1:48 AM
    Suppose as it has a cavity I!!!8217;m probably worrying too much
    • MikeEngTech
    • By MikeEngTech 11th Feb 18, 2:16 AM
    • 47 Posts
    • 12 Thanks
    MikeEngTech
    • #8
    • 11th Feb 18, 2:16 AM
    • #8
    • 11th Feb 18, 2:16 AM
    I might go for cement then plastering straight onto the brick rather than dot and dab plasterboard then. Had that in my previous place and it worked well. Only did the plasterboard in the bathroom.
    • Keriou
    • By Keriou 14th Mar 18, 7:45 PM
    • 5 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Keriou
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 7:45 PM
    • #9
    • 14th Mar 18, 7:45 PM
    Plasterboard and/or gypsum plaster is fine on upper levels, not ideal, but fine, as there is little risk of moisture. On ground floors where there IS a risk of moisture then applying a relatively water-resistant material like gypsum/plasterboard and especially cement! may cause saturation of that material and dampness where there was none before. It's difficult to get good advice but try a building surveyor specialising in damp problems rather than a damp specialist selling waterproofing.
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