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  • FIRST POST
    • scoot65
    • By scoot65 6th Feb 18, 11:18 AM
    • 176Posts
    • 77Thanks
    scoot65
    Fund (my first) S&S ISA now, or wait a few days?
    • #1
    • 6th Feb 18, 11:18 AM
    Fund (my first) S&S ISA now, or wait a few days? 6th Feb 18 at 11:18 AM
    After reading and asking questions on this board over the past several weeks / months, I finally opted to open / fund a S&S ISA using VLS60.

    Last night I opened an account with iWeb and currently have 20k sitting there waiting for me to buy!

    Given the news I woke up to this morning, should I wait a couple of days or so to see if the prices drop further?

    This is my first investment as currently all my cash is in various 'high' interest accounts / cash ISA and really need to reduce my liquid cash amount with is currently 140k as I realise that it's losing value due to inflation etc.
Page 3
    • thenewcomer
    • By thenewcomer 12th Feb 18, 11:29 PM
    • 93 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    thenewcomer
    why did you choose to invest on Vanguard fund via iweb and not via vanguard directly?
    • ValiantSon
    • By ValiantSon 13th Feb 18, 10:28 AM
    • 1,876 Posts
    • 1,737 Thanks
    ValiantSon
    is cavendish cheaper than iweb?
    Originally posted by thenewcomer
    It depends on how you use it and what the value of the investment is. If you are making regular payments then iWeb could get expensive at 5 per trade. Cavendish don't charge a trading fee. If you just buy in one lump sum then Cavendish will probably be more expensive because they charge 0.25% of the value of your investment.

    Vanguard Investor is only a good option if you are only going to buy Vanguard funds. If you are going to buy from any other providers then Vanguard isn't an option.
    • thenewcomer
    • By thenewcomer 14th Feb 18, 11:37 PM
    • 93 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    thenewcomer
    thanks valiant.
    • thenewcomer
    • By thenewcomer 15th Feb 18, 7:25 AM
    • 93 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    thenewcomer
    quick question- the age old question of drip feeding or lump sum investment. i prefer drip feeding, but wouldnt the monthly cost of transaction totalled up to a high cost?

    eg. iweb is 5 quids per buy, that will be 60 quids in a year!
    • lpgm
    • By lpgm 15th Feb 18, 7:39 AM
    • 216 Posts
    • 111 Thanks
    lpgm
    but wouldnt the monthly cost of transaction totalled up to a high cost?

    eg. iweb is 5 quids per buy, that will be 60 quids in a year!
    Originally posted by thenewcomer
    Yes. They said that.
    • bowlhead99
    • By bowlhead99 15th Feb 18, 7:42 AM
    • 7,833 Posts
    • 14,307 Thanks
    bowlhead99
    quick question- the age old question of drip feeding or lump sum investment. i prefer drip feeding, but wouldnt the monthly cost of transaction totalled up to a high cost?

    eg. iweb is 5 quids per buy, that will be 60 quids in a year!
    Originally posted by thenewcomer
    Well, that is why Valiant noted that somewhere like IWeb can get expensive as it charges per transaction while others such as Vanguardinvestor or Cavendish don't charge a trading fee but charge you a percentage on assets under administration instead.

    For example:

    18k drip fed into an ISA at 1.5k per month, average balance for the year is between 9-10k, charge at Cavendish will be a little over 20 for that first year, but if you kept on contributing at that pace it would be over 60 for the second year as you have more assets under administration. Unless you have big losses of course .

    Charge at IWeb would be 60 a year if making 12 purchases, but only 30 if making purchases every other month or 20 if making four quarterly purchases etc . Presumably you have no specific need to deploy the money monthly and bimonthly would still function as a 'drip feed', just a longer timelag before you start earning dividends and investment gains. If you were definitely going to be buying monthly, you could use Halifax Sharedealing which has a transaction-based charging structure while offering discounted 2 transaction fees if you book in advance to trade on a fixed day each month with their regular trading program.

    There are lots of options out there.
    • thenewcomer
    • By thenewcomer 15th Feb 18, 9:15 PM
    • 93 Posts
    • 20 Thanks
    thenewcomer
    thanks both. i find drip feeding an expensive way to invest!
    • badger09
    • By badger09 16th Feb 18, 12:54 PM
    • 5,944 Posts
    • 5,283 Thanks
    badger09
    thanks both. i find drip feeding an expensive way to invest!
    Originally posted by thenewcomer
    That depends on the platform charging structure
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