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  • FIRST POST
    • littleredhen
    • By littleredhen 4th Feb 18, 8:01 AM
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    littleredhen
    Wimbledon College of Art interview - help
    • #1
    • 4th Feb 18, 8:01 AM
    Wimbledon College of Art interview - help 4th Feb 18 at 8:01 AM
    My daughter has an interview 9am - 3pm at the above uni but we live in Scotland so here are my issues

    1. the date is soon so we haven't been able to access cheap train travel
    2. if she goes to stay with my sister in Reading the night before she has to change in London - tube etc
    3. if she doesn't stay at my sisters we have to find accommodation (cost)
    4. she suffers with mental health issues, one of which is severe anxiety
    5. money is an issue at the moment for me
    6. her current school of art told her to apply as she very likely to be accepted, she missed her exam years at school because of mental health but has attended her school of art nearly everyday, which has been a miracle
    7. if I can't find the money for her to do the interview it will be so tough on her although in reality I don't think she would even be able to cope going there
    8. she has applied to Scottish uni's which are free but obviously not guaranteed a place and the interviews for them are after the Wimbledon one

    I am not sure what my question is but some support would be really appreciated to help me unravel this
    The mind is like a parachute. It doesn’t work unless it’s open.

    A winner listens, a loser just waits until it is their turn to talk
Page 5
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 5th Feb 18, 5:23 PM
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    lincroft1710
    Don't all parents have third party authority on their offspring's bank accounts?
    Originally posted by silvercar
    If the offspring is over 18 then in law they are an adult. The only time a parent could be involved is if they were a guarantor.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 5th Feb 18, 5:29 PM
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    Spendless
    My daughter has been to interviews at 5 different Uni's, for every one, she had previously been to all their respective open days, one uni (her first choice) she went to two open days there, (i went to one with her) before her interview, to make sure that she was choosing the right one. I don't understand why the OP's daughter is going to an interview at a Uni which she has not even visited ? What is the point ? My daughter went to two open days and immediately said "i would never apply to go there, it was awful" It seems that her college are just trying to get her to apply for a Uni where she would be more likely to be offered a place rather than one that suits her circumstances ? Surely if they're aware of her mental health issues, they wouldn't recommend a Uni so far from home ? As her parent, i would be advising her to look closer to home too, IMO the interview will be a waste of time and money.
    Originally posted by meer53
    My son is in the same boat, applied to Unis he'd not looked round. Why? We are 'older' parents and didn't go to Uni ourselves, only a small % of our peer group did. A such, we had no idea what the process was. We thought the (FE) college he was at would give some guidance, lessons, information etc, so we'd know what we were doing. They didn't. Combine that with a child who said 'Dunno' each time we asked what needed doing. It's quite possible that the OP and her daughter has had a similar situation

    Our DS last week both attended an interview at a Uni he'd applied for but hadn't visited and at the weekend attended another ones open day, the 2nd he disliked straight away. On the same day I opened a letter addressed to 'The parents of DS' from the college inviting us to a parents evening and the information that they'd be including a presentation of 'going to Uni, is it the right thing for me?' That info would have been a lot more helpful last year if they'd sent it, not the month after the Ucas deadline!

    ETA - My son is under 18, so not legally an adult (yet) and we still haven't been kept informed and he started his course the September after GCSEs, when he was only 16.
    Last edited by Spendless; 05-02-2018 at 5:34 PM.
    • Voyager2002
    • By Voyager2002 5th Feb 18, 6:10 PM
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    Voyager2002
    Clearly the day in Wimbledon is a combined interview and open day... more sensible than expecting an interested candidate to visit twice. It is unfortunate that so little notice was given, making travel more expensive than necessary, but this will be something of an adventure and good practice for the interviews in Scotland.

    The first, obvious, suggestion: contact the College and ask whether there is any possibility of postponing this: perhaps they are holding their open/interview days on several occasions? Otherwise, attending this will be a worthwhile exercise: the discussion about whether studying in London rather than Scotland can be deferred until she has a number of offers and needs to make a decision.

    A flight to Heathrow would be very convenient for access to Heathrow. Otherwise, National Express to Victoria coach station would at least mean that she could get a coach from there to Reading with no need to travel across London. And of course there are plenty of cheap youth-hostel type places to say in the London area, as well as Air BnB.
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 5th Feb 18, 6:29 PM
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    silvercar
    If the offspring is over 18 then in law they are an adult. The only time a parent could be involved is if they were a guarantor.
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    This isn't correct. Anyone over 18 can give third party authority to another adult to be able to act with the bank on their account. My offspring did when they went abroad as a safety measure. It meant I could check for unauthorised activity on the account if (or should I say when ) bank cards were mislaid.
    • meer53
    • By meer53 5th Feb 18, 6:50 PM
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    meer53
    Clearly the day in Wimbledon is a combined interview and open day... more sensible than expecting an interested candidate to visit twice.

    Where does it say this ? All the interviews my daughter has had have been just that, interviews. The open days were nearly all towards the end of 2017. My daughter has visited her chosen Uni 3 times now, 2 open days and her interview. One open day wasnt really enough time for her to look round the Uni and the accomodation and speak to the tutors on her chosen course. Choosing a Uni is quite a big decision, to choose one just based on an interview visit is, in my opinion, a mistake.
    • lincroft1710
    • By lincroft1710 5th Feb 18, 7:17 PM
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    lincroft1710
    This isn't correct. Anyone over 18 can give third party authority to another adult to be able to act with the bank on their account. My offspring did when they went abroad as a safety measure. It meant I could check for unauthorised activity on the account if (or should I say when ) bank cards were mislaid.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    Well clearly if the account holder gives 3rd party authority to another adult then they would have access. Your original post "Don't all parents have third party authority on their offspring's bank accounts?" implied it was an automatic right rather an authority actually given by the offspring
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 5th Feb 18, 8:06 PM
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    silvercar
    Well clearly if the account holder gives 3rd party authority to another adult then they would have access. Your original post "Don't all parents have third party authority on their offspring's bank accounts?" implied it was an automatic right rather an authority actually given by the offspring
    Originally posted by lincroft1710
    Apologies. The wink emoji was suggesting I was joking.
    • Spendless
    • By Spendless 5th Feb 18, 8:36 PM
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    Spendless
    Clearly the day in Wimbledon is a combined interview and open day... more sensible than expecting an interested candidate to visit twice.

    Where does it say this ? All the interviews my daughter has had have been just that, interviews. The open days were nearly all towards the end of 2017. My daughter has visited her chosen Uni 3 times now, 2 open days and her interview. One open day wasnt really enough time for her to look round the Uni and the accomodation and speak to the tutors on her chosen course. Choosing a Uni is quite a big decision, to choose one just based on an interview visit is, in my opinion, a mistake.
    Originally posted by meer53
    The interview that my son went to last Wednesday with my husband followed a very similar format to the open day we did before Christmas at a different Uni. Have a presentation, look at the campus, look at the labs, learn about the course. The only differences were, last Wednesday's Uni hadn't advertised it as an open day and saw DS individually for the interview and they couldn't look inside the rooms of the campus accommodation.
    • BrassicWoman
    • By BrassicWoman 5th Feb 18, 9:08 PM
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    BrassicWoman
    online virtual tour for a kick off

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    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 5th Feb 18, 9:25 PM
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    Savvy_Sue
    Given the support ( financial and emotional) that students need from their parents, I would have thought that a parent would be very involved with their offspring's applications.

    Most students would be 17 or 18 and living at home, so I would have thought the school would be holding parent information evenings and discussing choices with parent and pupil. At the very least emailing parents that pupils were making choices, so the parent could choose to discuss with their offspring.

    The school must be very aware that pupils will struggle without some measure of financial support, so it seems sensible that they warn the parents at least.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    As pointed out later, sometimes the college's input comes a bit late!

    I think it varies from family to family and child to child. We went to information evenings at school for all three boys, but what happened with applications / open days etc was quite different.

    DS1 probably got the most support: I took him and a car load of his mates to Southampton, and I took him to Warwick and Birmingham because they were all reasonably straightforward journeys on days when I was free. He took himself to a couple of other open days, and didn't visit his last choice. I also talked him through the different kinds of university and accommodation - civic, collegiate, campus etc - because having attended a collegiate and worked at a 'new' campus, I knew how different they felt.

    DS2 took himself to Cambridge, went with a friend to Warwick, and didn't visit anywhere else because he decided he didn't, after all, want to be in London or Durham, plus he was insulted by their offers.

    DS3 sorted himself out, apart from a trip to Brighton which was the first time DH had attended any open days. And he was shocked at the hard sell being given to us, the parents. I was used to it by that time.

    But while I was happy to talk to mine about their potential choices, I knew the reality was that if we'd even attempted to influence them, they'd have made diametrically opposite decisions!!!

    Now, not all offspring are like that, but some ARE!

    I went to art school and I was 18 the day I started my foundation course and the youngest there. There was no contact with my parents at all.

    I now work for a university and have been asked by parents at open days how they will be kept informed of their offspring's progress, or lack of it. The simple answer is that they won't. We don't contact parents on any matter without the student's permission or a dire emergency.

    They are adults, not children.
    Originally posted by Gloomendoom
    Yes, that's been my experience too. And I can see it's a shame it's not worked out for deanna's son - I found one Uni's support services talked to me about DS1's needs when he went to an open day, and I don't know if a dialogue would have been maintained if he'd gone there, had it been necessary. But if that line isn't drawn, where / when will it be drawn?
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    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 5th Feb 18, 9:52 PM
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    Tabbytabitha
    Clearly the day in Wimbledon is a combined interview and open day... more sensible than expecting an interested candidate to visit twice.

    Where does it say this ? All the interviews my daughter has had have been just that, interviews. The open days were nearly all towards the end of 2017. My daughter has visited her chosen Uni 3 times now, 2 open days and her interview. One open day wasnt really enough time for her to look round the Uni and the accomodation and speak to the tutors on her chosen course. Choosing a Uni is quite a big decision, to choose one just based on an interview visit is, in my opinion, a mistake.
    Originally posted by meer53
    Open days are a comparatively recent phenomenon - we used to make our choices based on the prospectus alone and we knew that it was about whether the university chose us! I don't think that consumerism and HE sit well together.
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 5th Feb 18, 9:53 PM
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    onlyroz
    Yes but it is in south London and she would need to travel into London every time she went home/came back.
    Originally posted by Grumpelstiltskin
    Not necessarily. I think you can get to Wimbledon from Guildford, and there is also a line between Reading and Guildford if she has relatives in Reading.

    My view is that if at all possible she should try to attend the interview - otherwise how will she have any idea if this is something that she wants to do and could cope with?
    • SingleSue
    • By SingleSue 6th Feb 18, 8:24 AM
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    SingleSue
    I became more involved with each subsequent child. Eldest applied to the ones he wanted and only attended one open day and one interview (at the same university), I went with him but more as the parent who pays than anything else. The uni he eventually went to he had never set foot in before the day he arrived to start there.

    Middle son, choices were discussed as there were certain criteria that needed to be met first. All required an interview/audition and were combination tours plus interview/audition days. He loved his eventual university from the first visit (we visited twice in the end).

    Youngest son, we started open days early, lots of planning went into it and his eventual choice/city was visited 7 times before he started, always with me in tow.

    However, I am not the over protective parent that this implies, both middle and youngest have disabilities and needed the extra parental support and in fact, it was essential to the process and a successful outcome. Eldest son has always been very independent and done his own thing.

    It almost went wrong with middle son last year, he had moved out of halls (as is common in 2nd year) and the loss of the supportive environment and the lack of rules meant that he couldn't cope and his mental health declined whilst his ASD increased. He stopped accessing his support, wouldn't talk to anyone (me included) and ended up in a very bad place. In the end, he was on the verge of being kicked out, things were so bad that he received the termination of studies email and we had to go through their appeals process.

    Lots of work went on over the summer to rebuild his mental health, his coping strategies, his stress relievers alongside working with the university to see if there was a way back for him. Thankfully, they could see the improvements made and after meeting their requirements for fitness to study, he was allowed back to redo second year, albeit starting slightly later than his peers.

    He is back in halls accommodation as a disabled student and will remain so for his duration at the uni and working with his support and I am glad to say, doing very well indeed.

    With youngest son, I make frequent visits to the uni city he is in and stay for a day or two to keep him 'balanced'. He, unlike his brother, realises when he is on a downward slope and will use certain keywords to let me know it is time to come up as he is struggling (so he can ask without actually saying the proper words, he does like his code words). He also has to ring me every time he leaves his accommodation to cope with his over sensitivity to noise and his surroundings as it forces his brain to think about other things rather than the scary outside world...it's quite weird going shopping via the end of a telephone. He has found these ways of coping rather than me and although it can be a bit of a bind for me, if it works for him, then I will continue to do it (and obviously it is working for him, he is on a high first at the moment, managing his money well and is in a good place mentally).
    Last edited by SingleSue; 06-02-2018 at 8:37 AM.
    We made it! One graduated, 2 currently at university, been hard work but it shows there is a possibility of a chance of normal (ish) life after a diagnosis (or two) of ASD. It's not been the easiest route but I am so glad I ignored everything and everyone and did my own therapies with them.
    Eldests' EDS diagnosis 4.5.10, mine 13.1.11 eekk!
    • Gloomendoom
    • By Gloomendoom 6th Feb 18, 9:19 AM
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    Gloomendoom
    Open days are a comparatively recent phenomenon - we used to make our choices based on the prospectus alone and we knew that it was about whether the university chose us!
    Originally posted by Tabbytabitha
    Back in the late 70's the normal procedure was to send off for a few prospectuses and apply, by post, to the ones you liked the look of. If you were lucky, you would get offered an interview. I got three interviews for my foundation course which resulted in one unconditional offer. It was very much them picking you, not vice versa.

    My degree course was easier as there was only one school that did the course I wanted to do. Beyond the perusal of the prospectuses, parental involvement was minimal... a lift to the station if you were lucky.

    I don't think that consumerism and HE sit well together.
    They don't.
    Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.” - Mark Twain
    • meer53
    • By meer53 6th Feb 18, 1:50 PM
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    meer53
    I can't comment on other courses but all the interviews my daughter has attended were more or less the same format. Take part in a group exercise, prepare a presentation to be delivered to the course tutors, (the subject was given in the invitation letter) take maths and english tests and then have a face to face interview with the course tutor and another Uni official. Luckily she received conditional offers from all the ones she had applied to, she still has to pass the Dept Of Education Skills Tests in Maths and English to be guaranteed a place. She received an unconditional offer for a different course at one Uni.

    She only received 2 days notice for one of these interviews, it was quite stressful really. I'm pleased it's all done now !
    • silvercar
    • By silvercar 6th Feb 18, 4:42 PM
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    silvercar
    The format must be subject related. My kids received their offers without interviews and then were invited to a post-offer open day. So all the students on that day had been given offers and the aim of the day was to show students the department/ uni/ accommodation/ town but also to sell the uni to them.

    I don't if they were lucky not to have interviews first or whether that is standard for their subject, but it happened for both of them for all their applications, mainly Russell group universities.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 6th Feb 18, 4:53 PM
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    Tabbytabitha
    The format must be subject related. My kids received their offers without interviews and then were invited to a post-offer open day. So all the students on that day had been given offers and the aim of the day was to show students the department/ uni/ accommodation/ town but also to sell the uni to them.

    I don't if they were lucky not to have interviews first or whether that is standard for their subject, but it happened for both of them for all their applications, mainly Russell group universities.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    Many universities only interview the border line applicants - those they definitely want get immediate offers.
    • Cheeseface
    • By Cheeseface 6th Feb 18, 5:39 PM
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    Cheeseface
    The format must be subject related. My kids received their offers without interviews and then were invited to a post-offer open day. So all the students on that day had been given offers and the aim of the day was to show students the department/ uni/ accommodation/ town but also to sell the uni to them.

    I don't if they were lucky not to have interviews first or whether that is standard for their subject, but it happened for both of them for all their applications, mainly Russell group universities.
    Originally posted by silvercar
    Many universities only interview the border line applicants - those they definitely want get immediate offers.
    Originally posted by Tabbytabitha
    My child is studying maths at a Russell Group uni. They got offers from 2 RG unis (ABB, ABA), interview with offer from another RG ( needed AAA) and an unconditional offer from a high rated non RG uni. They ended up with ABA* and got into the one needing AAA.

    We went to seven open days altogether. I can’t imagine not going to investigate. At one uni, there were no subject lecturers available to talk to one the open day so we ruled that out quickly. You wouldn’t have got that from a prospectus.
    • meer53
    • By meer53 6th Feb 18, 5:54 PM
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    meer53
    Many universities only interview the border line applicants - those they definitely want get immediate offers.
    Originally posted by Tabbytabitha
    My daughter was applying for a Teaching degree, after interviews, the successful applicants are given conditional offers if they haven't already passed the DFE Skills Tests in Maths and English. If they haven't passed the skills tests after 3 attempts, they aren't allowed to take them again for 2 years. I don't think any Uni would offer a place on a Teaching Course without interviewing first.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 6th Feb 18, 5:58 PM
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    Tabbytabitha
    My child is studying maths at a Russell Group uni. They got offers from 2 RG unis (ABB, ABA), interview with offer from another RG ( needed AAA) and an unconditional offer from a high rated non RG uni. They ended up with ABA* and got into the one needing AAA.

    We went to seven open days altogether. I can’t imagine not going to investigate. At one uni, there were no subject lecturers available to talk to one the open day so we ruled that out quickly. You wouldn’t have got that from a prospectus.
    Originally posted by Cheeseface
    You wouldn't have got what from a prospectus?
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