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  • FIRST POST
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 25th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    • 1,076Posts
    • 381Thanks
    sevenhills
    Standing for election is a human right
    • #1
    • 25th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    Standing for election is a human right 25th Jan 18 at 6:37 PM
    In the UK over 5.5 million people work in central and local Government. Many of those workers will be disqualified from standing for election. As a local authority worker for Leeds City Council, myself and all my 14,632 colleagues are disqualified from standing for election to our city council. Disqualifying almost 15,000 people from standing for election seems quite bizarre to me, not many people are interested in politics, the bigger the pool to choose from, the better. The turnout in my electoral ward in 2016, in Leeds was just under 31%, a sad reflection on how people feel about politics. In the English local elections of 2016, in some areas fewer than one in five eligible voters went to their local polling station to cast a vote, we have a broken system. But the Scottish system seems much better, the turnout in the 2012 Scottish local elections was 39.6%, and in 2017 local elections turnout was 46.9%


    In Scotland the rules were changed in 2005 so that an employee of a local authority could stand for election to that authority, and would only have to resign their employment if they were elected. The Electoral Commission carried out a report for the government in 2015, the report recommended that England should adopt the same qualifying rules for elections as Scotland, and local authority workers should be allowed to stand, but they would have to resign their job with the local authority if elected. The report has not been acted upon yet. The Conservative gave the DUP 1 billion so that they can get bills through Parliament, but very little few bills are being processed.


    "The Electoral Commission recommend that the law in England, Wales and Northern Ireland is changed to make a clear distinction between offices or employment which would prevent someone standing for election, and those which would prevent someone from holding office if elected"

Page 2
    • mgdavid
    • By mgdavid 9th Feb 18, 7:12 PM
    • 5,516 Posts
    • 4,819 Thanks
    mgdavid
    .............
    Its a sledge hammer to crack a nut. There may be people within that 5 million that have influence and should not stand, I am not one of them.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    If you feel strongly about it, change your job.....
    The questions that get the best answers are the questions that give most detail....
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 9th Feb 18, 7:35 PM
    • 1,076 Posts
    • 381 Thanks
    sevenhills
    If you feel strongly about it, change your job.....
    Originally posted by mgdavid
    Myself and 5 million other people could be faced with that situation, I may do that in a few years.
    In some elections, fewer than 20% vote, in my area it was 30% turnout; I believe there is a problem. More choice on the ballot paper would be a good thing.

    • martinsurrey
    • By martinsurrey 12th Feb 18, 12:23 PM
    • 3,340 Posts
    • 4,091 Thanks
    martinsurrey
    When the rules says "Your resignation will take immediate effect regardless of any notice period previously specified.", I do not think you will be sued if you are following the law of the land.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    That law ONLY applies to people who work for the local authority, not everyone else, for everyone else notice periods DO apply.

    And yes senior employees do get sued if they breach their contracts on notice periods.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 12th Feb 18, 12:32 PM
    • 1,076 Posts
    • 381 Thanks
    sevenhills
    And yes senior employees do get sued if they breach their contracts on notice periods.
    Originally posted by martinsurrey
    As I have posted before, 'senior employees' may well be classed as working in politically sensitive posts, and will be disqualified from standing.

    • martinsurrey
    • By martinsurrey 12th Feb 18, 2:42 PM
    • 3,340 Posts
    • 4,091 Thanks
    martinsurrey
    As I have posted before, 'senior employees' may well be classed as working in politically sensitive posts, and will be disqualified from standing.
    Originally posted by sevenhills
    but EVERY employee of non LA posts will have to work their notice, or get a terrible reference if they need a job after serving/and or sued, you seem to want LA employees to be better off than everyone else.
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 12th Feb 18, 6:15 PM
    • 1,076 Posts
    • 381 Thanks
    sevenhills
    but EVERY employee of non LA posts will have to work their notice, or get a terrible reference if they need a job after serving/and or sued, you seem to want LA employees to be better off than everyone else.
    Originally posted by martinsurrey
    Local Authorities are large employers, they should be able to manage without notice, those are the rules in Scotland, they will be aware that someone is standing for election.

    A local Authority worker will be getting less pay, because they cannot work their notice, is that fair, its a price worth paying. But very few want to do it.

    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 12th Feb 18, 6:42 PM
    • 3,749 Posts
    • 5,160 Thanks
    Nick_C
    The "politically restricted posts" rule came about in London, where Labour Councillors in one area were employed as high ranking officers in neighbouring areas.

    It is over and above the rule that you cannot stand for election to the council which employs you.

    Personally, I think Local Government Officers should publicly display political neutrality. You are there to serve the elected administration. You may or may not agree with their objectives, but it is your job to carry them out. If you let your personal views get in the way then it is impeding your judgement.

    Carry on serving the community as an impartial Officer, or resign and stand for election
    • sevenhills
    • By sevenhills 12th Feb 18, 8:51 PM
    • 1,076 Posts
    • 381 Thanks
    sevenhills
    It is over and above the rule that you cannot stand for election to the council which employs you.

    I do not understand this.
    Originally posted by Nick_C
    Personally, I think Local Government Officers should publicly display political neutrality.

    I drive a minibus, are you calling me an 'officer'? What difference would it make if I were display a political poster in my front door at home?
    I do of course, support my employer.

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