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  • FIRST POST
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 15th Jan 18, 1:45 PM
    • 5,391Posts
    • 25,336Thanks
    Slinky
    KonMari 2018 - The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up
    • #1
    • 15th Jan 18, 1:45 PM
    KonMari 2018 - The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up 15th Jan 18 at 1:45 PM
    Since there seems to be a few new threads being started in case old ones are accidentally lost, shall I do the same for KonMari?

    Here's the links to the old threads with thanks to VfM4meplse and greent

    2017

    2016

    2015


    'The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up' by Marie Kondo is a home organisation/ decluttering book like no other. Instead of looking for things to discard, Marie Kondo says we should instead look for things we wish to keep - using the 'does it spark joy?' method. Ultimately this means that everything in our homes should spark joy for us You might not think that everyday and seemingly mundane items can't spark joy - but you need to think around it a little. So whilst an iron may not spark joy, wearing ironed clothes may. A cheese grater may not spark joy, but your child may really like grated cheese in their wraps - which brings joy.

    Marie Kondo also says that this should be done quickly and properly. This may take six months to achieve, but tidying properly should mean doing it just once. This is against the often-seen decluttering advice of doing 15 minutes a day, or a drawer/ shelf a day.

    MK suggests an order as to what to sort through first and subsequently. This is important - she starts with items which many people do not have an emotional attachment to (clothes) and builds up to sentimental items (photos) so that a person's joy-meter can be developed along the way.

    Many MSE-ers have been following the KM method (kondo-ing) successfully. It fits into the MSE ethos by changing your mindse - you will no longer want to shop mindlessly for something 'just because' or 'it'll do' - you will want to buy only joyful items, thereby often saving ££ on random, impulse purchases.

    This Forum tip was included in MoneySavingExpert.com's weekly email!
    Last edited by MSE Andrea; 24-01-2018 at 10:01 AM. Reason: Add new hyperlink, thanks zippychick
Page 47
    • PollyWollyDoodle
    • By PollyWollyDoodle 12th Apr 18, 8:34 PM
    • 1,028 Posts
    • 23,693 Thanks
    PollyWollyDoodle
    Completely agree with you GQ. I've noticed over the last few years how it's become very one-way with some friends - always happy to see you if you suggest something, but they never make the effort in return.

    I'm lucky enough to have some very good friends who I know would be there for me if I needed anything, and whom I see often. I have some other friends who I see less often - mainly due to distance - but it never feels as if it's been months since we met, we just pick up where we left off. And then there are the others .... life is just too short.
    "Inconceivable". "You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means."
    • kittie
    • By kittie 13th Apr 18, 6:36 AM
    • 12,446 Posts
    • 78,951 Thanks
    kittie
    good luck with hip results GQ.

    About time cbd was sold in pharmacies ie cheap enough and good enough. I have a very small bottle, take it less than once a month as it costs such a lot but it chases the hip pains away. Devil and deep blue sea, star jumps or pounding steps for bone density or don`t do anything and get crumbly bomes

    It was nice just being able to take clothes and a warm body warmer out of the wardrobe yesterday, this is my way forward and I am dividing sections with a multiple skirt/trouser hanger. It is working for me

    Yes me too with `friends`, some people only get in touch with notebook in hand, I am ye olde woman in the woods to them. I can rely on my sisters, brothers and two good friends who are also my neighbours. I remember splitting from a horse riding partner, 18 years ago, she was so energy-draining. Then she hit the roof when I split, really lost it, I could then see her mental problems and was glad to be out. She also left a trail of empty gin bottles when she went for walks. I was utterly fed up of being her one-sided prop
    • Wednesday2000
    • By Wednesday2000 13th Apr 18, 1:59 PM
    • 1,851 Posts
    • 12,748 Thanks
    Wednesday2000
    I've just been watching a 20 minute documentary on YouTube and thought people on here might be interested. It's called A Cluttered Life: Middle-Class Abundance. I couldn't believe the amount of toys the kids had in the houses!

    I decided I am going to eat down some of my store cupboard as we don't eat things like soup in the summer. It will free up some more space for dried pasta as I like to make cold pasta salads in warmer weather.

    It was so nice to get those 2 bin bags of clothes out of the house. I have rearranged the clothes left in my wardrobe and it looks very spacious now.
    2018: Simplify your life
    • Igamogam
    • By Igamogam 13th Apr 18, 2:04 PM
    • 5,559 Posts
    • 45,594 Thanks
    Igamogam
    Podiatrist said fitflops are bad for my feet as are crocs, which he called devils footwear.
    Originally posted by kittie
    Oh no I love my Crocs and shame to say, not in a very KM fashion I have multiple pairs but each bring me joy so I guess that is allowed I wear mine from 1st April to 30th September everyday without fail - this is the time I go without socks whatever the weather And when I can get away with it I wear them for work too I guess as I dont have problems with my feet then maybe thats why I find them very easy and comfortable to wear. Wonder why so many health professionals wear them??Especially surgeons and theatre staff

    Slow on the declutter front this last week - back to work after 2 weeks off so not much time or inclination. OH however has put a pile of his books to one side for redistribution - I am going to take to CS next time I am passing.
    Be the change you want to see -with apologies to Gandhi
    In gardens, beauty is a by-product. The main business is sex and death. ~Sam Llewelyn
    'On the internet no one knows you are a cat'
    • greent
    • By greent 13th Apr 18, 5:31 PM
    • 7,242 Posts
    • 73,575 Thanks
    greent
    4 of my listings on fleabay sold yesterdayand all have been paid for. All are for breakables, so as well as the 4 listings (way more than 4 items, as includes a set of 8 cups and saucers for 1 listing, for example) I am also getting rid of 3 large boxes to pack them in (2 things sold to 1 buyer) and HEAPS of packaging - lots of bubble wrap/ air pillows/ polystyrene stuff/ paper - all recycled from things we've had (mainly recent kitchen purchases/ the new shower enclosure) - great to get rid of the packaging as much as the items - I've been saving it (and the large boxes) forselling the breakables, but it takes up quite a lot of room (esp the polystyrene(?) large lumps of stuff)
    I am the master of my fate; I am the captain of my soul
    Repaid mtge early (orig 11/25) 01/09 £124616 01/10 £104927 01/11 £89873 01/12 £76317 01/13 £52546 01/14 £35356 01/15 £12133 07/15 £NIL
    BTL Mtge 12/16 £69786. 2018 OPs (#18) £3290.25/£4000
    Net sales 2018 £614.82/£1000 PAYDOX18 (#15) Done £18918.90
    • wort
    • By wort 13th Apr 18, 6:33 PM
    • 791 Posts
    • 10,342 Thanks
    wort
    I love my fitflops , the podiatrist/physiotherapist told me they were excellent for my feet, as they mean my toes don't bend it's a roll motion, I have 2 neuromas on my left foot and a deformed sesamoid bone in my right foot. I live in them in summer in winter I have to wear specially made insoles in my shoes. Otherwise my feet are agony.
    Focus on contribution instead of the impressiveness of consumption to see the true beauty in people.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 14th Apr 18, 7:33 AM
    • 12,055 Posts
    • 232,471 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    Morning all, been a bit MIA due to being either at work or at the allotment. Or asleep, which kinda inhibits my posting style.

    Yesterday, I popped into the juntique shop and found my dear pal in a paperwork muddle, which I proceeded to sort out a bit, finding a medal in the middle of it, which I just laid to one side (finding extremely random items among paperwork on his desk being the norm not the exception, you see).

    A few minutes later, he pounced on it with a cry of joy.

    Pal; Where did you find that?!
    GQ; In the paperwork.
    Pal. ???
    GQ *points to the in-tray* it was between the bills.
    Pal: I've been looking for that for days.
    GQ: (Pal has gone silent and is looking thoughtful). What?
    Pal; Someone wanted to buy it but I couldn't find it and now I can't remember which person wanted it...........

    This kind of interaction is very usual with my pal, and my ability to find things is the reason he keeps trying to poach me from my current employer.

    Plot2 Diaries.

    Was up there yestereve, having not been on site since Sunday. Got the mattock out and advanced on the horrible couch grass tussocks with a grim face. Feeling a bit tired (mattocking is heavy work) so decided to do only a few minutes' worth and to concentrate on taking out the biggest tussocks. By getting the biggest ones out, the ones which stand about 18-24 inches tall, I get the feeling of progress, and morale is an important part of plot-clearance.

    Sooo, I swung the mattock into the base of the biggest tussock, expecting to take several swipes to sever its roots before it would move, and it started to shift after one stroke. The second stroke revealed the reason why; the horrible slither of steel on plastic.

    Short version is, I have a row of tussocks of couch grass which are growing on a row of black bin sacks (semi-disintegrated now) where the previous tenant had bagged couch grass tussocks and piled them on the boundary. I expect their ears were burning last night as I was cursing them sideways-to-Sunday.

    After that, and pulling the plastic away, I got the hump and took my mattock up to the berm at the top of the plot, and continued the work there, until I hit metal, which was still at least a foot underground. Much excavation revealed a bit of sheet metal, white on one side, which appears to be the flank of a washing machine.

    Why-oh-why this was ever on an allotment, and why it ended up two feet underground (I have reduced the berm's orginal height considerably to get to the level I was working at last night) is something we shall never know.

    I shall be back there later today. There may be updates. If you're good.
    Last edited by GreyQueen; 14-04-2018 at 8:02 AM. Reason: spellingks
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 14th Apr 18, 1:43 PM
    • 5,391 Posts
    • 25,336 Thanks
    Slinky
    I'm astonished at the incompetence of some people who would bother to have an allotment. If you know bog-all about gardening and have no skill, why would you pay to do it?
    • silvasava
    • By silvasava 14th Apr 18, 3:26 PM
    • 3,854 Posts
    • 61,981 Thanks
    silvasava
    GQ - you must get your strength from the spinach you grow
    Only a small couple of out's today - a part bag of terracotta marbles for DS1 plant pots and a bright blue Ikeeya doormat for his front step.
    Hope everyone has a good day and gets to enjoy some sunshine
    Small victories - sometimes they are all you can hope for but sometimes they are all you need - be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 14th Apr 18, 4:29 PM
    • 12,055 Posts
    • 232,471 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I'm astonished at the incompetence of some people who would bother to have an allotment. If you know bog-all about gardening and have no skill, why would you pay to do it?
    Originally posted by Slinky
    You and me both. It's not like you acquire an allotment by accident, is it? I perfectly understand that some people buy houses which have gardens and they'd be perfectly happy to astroturf/ pave the lot. I think of them as being ungrateful bu88ers, but I understand the POV.

    But taking on an allotment and not working it/ littering it with non-bio trash? Nope, not getting that. I have ranted many a time on this site about my desire to force-feed the green waffle rubber carpet underlay that some numptie carpetted my first plot with, to them. It'd be a cleaner death than they deserve, frankly.

    Was describing last night's events to an allotmentering pal who was saucer-eyed and said he hoped there wasn't the rest of the washer down there! Ye gods, I hope so too, particularly because you can do interesting things with the drums and I don't want to be tempted to keep one if I find one.

    Visited the juntique shop; the person who'd asked for the lost-but-found medal came in and bought it today. £180! Thank goodness I found it.

    I have decluttered £2 at the bookies' on SeeYouAtMidnight for the National. Hope he completes the race uninjured. Anyone else having a flutter?
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 14th Apr 18, 5:04 PM
    • 29,605 Posts
    • 170,426 Thanks
    Karmacat
    Good lord, GQ, how amazing! Between the bags of couch grass, the wm, and the medal ... you're reversing entropy all on your own it's very impressive!

    Trying to think what I've done myself, to merit posting on the KM thread Well, I *have* tidied up my medical supplies to a splendiferous point I've had a lot of stuff come in from my mum - lovely crepe bandages, tubular bandages, the odd set of tablets of codeine plus three million disposable gloves. Things are now in only 3 containers, and not spread out over the whole house ... every time something gets tidy and stays tidy, it means I can find it in the future, yes? Please say yes
    Retired August 2016
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 14th Apr 18, 5:34 PM
    • 12,055 Posts
    • 232,471 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I have also acquired 22 kg of coffee grounds, 10 kg of racehorse dung, two bundles of bamboo bean sticks and a tarte au citron. Three of these four items are going onto the allotment, can you guess which one isn't?

    The latter was my reward for dragging the former around. My horse has come around the course successfully although he has not won. I'm £2 down but it was worth it for the adrenaline rush.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 14th Apr 18, 5:43 PM
    • 5,391 Posts
    • 25,336 Thanks
    Slinky
    Didn't have a bet this year. Last year OH had a horse in the works sweep but couldn't remember what it was. Which meant we didn't cheer at the end when we should have done as his horse won.


    Our friends bought a house with carpet buried in the back garden. I don't think it had a body rolled up in it.
    • Knit Witch
    • By Knit Witch 14th Apr 18, 6:19 PM
    • 3,567 Posts
    • 32,669 Thanks
    Knit Witch
    I have decluttered £2 at the bookies' on SeeYouAtMidnight for the National. Hope he completes the race uninjured. Anyone else having a flutter?
    Originally posted by GreyQueen
    Only a couple of squidles at the pub on their sweep (can't even remember which nags I ended up getting for me and Dr Witch )
    V3ry - £389.60
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 14th Apr 18, 9:10 PM
    • 12,055 Posts
    • 232,471 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I don't grow spinach, silvasava, I grow chard. Feral chard. Cannot recall the original price of the pkt of Rainbow Lights chard which is the predecessor of ten years of feral chard, but it was probably < £1 and has been the best veggie money ever spent.

    Stuff's virtually indestructible. A couple of weeks ago, I had to dig up half a dozen overwintered ferals as they were in the way of the potato patch. Huge gnarly rootstocks, clarted with earth. It was a wet day, so I parked them like a small fleet on the top of the soil elsewere, expecting the tops to die back. Did they heck, the weather has been so wet and damp that the uprooted plants are still growing. I shall harvest some baby salad leaves tomorrow.

    Hydroponics? Pah, this gardener can grow things out of the soil.

    News from Plot2, today's installment.

    OK, still feeling a bit wicked off about the tussock-and-bin-bag situation and hoping I don't bump into my ex-lottie neighbour in town until I have cooled off a bit. Sooo, decided to tackle The Berm.

    This is the section at the top of the allotment where a load of inorganic garbage had been slung, covered with earth to create a raised berm about 3ft high and 4 yards wide, which had then been colonised by brambles, nettles and my most favourist wild plant ever (heavy sarcasm) - Grrrrrreater Bellbind! This is colloquially known as Hellweed, and various other things unprintable in a proper and decent forum like wot this one is.

    I tooled up with mattock, gloves, digging fork, giant trug for the roots and giant plastic sack for the inorganic trash. And then, mes amies, Cold Steel and Stubborness met Vegetative Trash Pile Hell.

    Winning! The Berm is now The Slight Slope, copious amounts of plastic flakes, binder twine, pottery, glass, two lids off Vitalite tubs, fragments of flowerpots and other ghastly rubbish and bagged.

    I have also dug up another large piece of sheet metal, older and frailer than the WM flank, which looks vaguely agricultural. Plus something the size of a small hardcover book, weighing about a kilo, heavily corroded and which looks like nothing so much as a giant hinge.

    Have never seen anything like that, if it was a door hinge, you'd need a castle or something to fit the door. I have put it to one side and will brandish it in front of visiting plot holders to see if anyone has a clue what it is.

    When the 25 kg plastic sack is full I shall sort out the contents into recycalbles and non-recyclables, wash as necessary, and try to get a least some of it back into the materials stream.
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • kittie
    • By kittie 15th Apr 18, 7:14 AM
    • 12,446 Posts
    • 78,951 Thanks
    kittie
    gardeners seem to garden in all sorts of ways, roughly divided into the randoom gardener,the sow itself anywhere with free and random self seedings then there is the ordered gardener, the ordered sow in straight lines from a packet and planted plants in their own spaces with the hoe killing off any self seeders.

    I guess it is natural to be one or the other, depends on the sidedness of the brain. I am the latter. I have finished my sowings, even cucs, beans,courgettes and squash, warm enough under cover but the time of year when they will be in and out of my house. I have attained self-discipline this year, only sown as much as I can eat or store. No doubt that the veggies will get their own back due to having lots more room to exercise their growing rights

    I am about to unpack my re-bounder from its bag, bring it in from the shed, need to bounce to make strong bones.

    I love chard, multi purpose spinach -like with stalks like celery. The newly sown seeds are sprouting. I sow fordhook giant, the geen one, it doesn`t bolt. My spinach last year bolted

    re old seeds v new seeds: old sunflower 60% germination, kalibos 20% if that. New duncan 100%. I am waiting for year old soaked beans, sown 5 and need 3 to germinate
    Last edited by kittie; 15-04-2018 at 7:17 AM.
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 15th Apr 18, 7:35 AM
    • 12,055 Posts
    • 232,471 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I plant things in neat rows, kittie, and I like them to stand to attention and salute when I pass by. But I also allow things to self-seed and stay where they grow if they're not too much in the way. The latter applies to wild plants as well, particularly things beloved of bees such as common mallow, which is definately one of the commonest weeds on Plot1.

    I also acquired fumitory from somewhere a few years ago, a blow-in, which is pretty and bee-friendly. My sunflowers are all self-sown, as are my pot marigolds and the feral chards, of course.

    Am easing into the day, will on the lotties for most of it, my young pal with the car will be bringing up the coffee grounds, the dung and the bean pole bundles and we shall have a cuppa of flasks and something of high calorific density and a good old chat.

    I have plans which will acquire a lot of effort, hence the justification for the calorific; mattock will feature strongly. I'm gobsmacked that anyone does heavy clearance work without these, they're the bomb for digging up bad things like bramble roots, of which I have plenty.

    Have a good day, everyone. GQ xx
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

    • Karmacat
    • By Karmacat 15th Apr 18, 9:00 AM
    • 29,605 Posts
    • 170,426 Thanks
    Karmacat
    Hope it goes really well today, GQ, I'm glad you've got help in transporting the organic stuff ... as for brambles, hmm, the younger roots are definitely diggable out with a good strong garden fork, but I can well see that I might need an actual mattock for the big stuff, which I'm getting to just now: as I get to the back of the stock of branches I need to store upright for the bonfire (which is going well!) I've found an enormous bramble root - its actually grown up through a rhodendron thats 20 feet tall, and growing back down through it again, to make new bramblets. Mattock might be a jolly good idea
    Retired August 2016
    • kittie
    • By kittie 15th Apr 18, 9:04 AM
    • 12,446 Posts
    • 78,951 Thanks
    kittie
    oh yes mattocks and azadas. I had a mix from when I started the concrete allotment, gave away the big heavyweight azadas when I was on my own and anyway the hard work was done with them. Amazing tools, to be used with tough boots

    http://www.get-digging.co.uk/

    I kept two hand azadas and the mattock-like lightweight azada with two points. The heavy azadas sliced through the soil as though the soil was butter but I didn`t need them any more and re-homed them

    I just went to see the azadas in my home shed and realised that I need to sharpen these three tools. I used half a bottle of redundant oil when I sharpened on the allotment yesterday, even lawn mower blades and everything moving on anything was oiled. They will be satisfying to sharpen, I will soon see the sharpener turn the oil to black oil as it removes metal and makes razors

    More seeds ordered today, 4 different small kales, I will only be growing 2 of each variety but kales kept me going through winter again this year, I bought them from the farmers. Someone told me about making smelly garlic wash to keep whitefly off. Whitefly is why I didn`t grow them last year. I will have 000s of spare kale seeds so will now do what I used to do and keep seeds in lock n locks in the fridge all year

    Bouncing has started, easy peasy to remember as I watch the kettle in the kitchen
    • GreyQueen
    • By GreyQueen 15th Apr 18, 9:25 AM
    • 12,055 Posts
    • 232,471 Thanks
    GreyQueen
    I have a a pick-axe style mattock. There are two blades to the head, each with a cutting edge of only a few inches wide, and one is set at 45 degrees to the other.

    The main edge is used in a chopping motion, I lift the mattock to about waist height and let its considerable weight chop it into the roots of whatever. Because the blades have a slight curve, you can also rock it back and forward, once it's under something, to lever it up.

    It's funny but some people have gardened for lifetime in this country and never used a mattock, never seen one used or even heard of them. You let them have a go with one at a tough task, however, and you'll have to fight to get it back again. They go off with shining eyes, vowing to get their own, too.

    It's an excellent product which sells itself after a real-world demonstration, isn't it? Mine came from Axminster Tools, you buy the head and the handle separately. I chose a hickory-wood handle rather than fibre-glass or beech. Hickory is one of the toughest American hardwoods and is reckoned to be highly resistant to shocks.

    Well, some of the horrors it's helped dig up on three allotments now, it'd better be shock-proof.

    ETA; glad the bonfire pile is coming along nicely, Karmakat. We're now in the six months of the year when bonfires aren't allowed on the allotments, a rule to which I adhere most strictly. It's a damned nuisance but there you go. I am already building a burn bag to be the core of the early October bonfire. In fact, I shall build about three of them over the coming months, as I tend to have about 2-3 fires in the six month burning season. The bad roots are going to be dried out as much as possible and turned into potash via the bonfire, come early October.
    Last edited by GreyQueen; 15-04-2018 at 9:30 AM. Reason: to add a bit
    Every increased possession loads us with a new weariness.
    John Ruskin
    Veni, vidi, eradici
    (I came, I saw, I kondo'd)

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