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  • FIRST POST
    • Jaclynsurrey
    • By Jaclynsurrey 11th Jan 18, 9:37 AM
    • 2Posts
    • 2Thanks
    Jaclynsurrey
    Child turning 18 - c800 a month lost
    • #1
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:37 AM
    Child turning 18 - c800 a month lost 11th Jan 18 at 9:37 AM
    Hello

    I guess i am looking for advance advice/help! My daughter will be 18 next March (2019) and is currently in full time education, when she turns 18 I will loose a substantial amount of money a month as follows:

    396 per month Child maintenance
    75 per week Working/Child Tax Credits
    82 per 4 weeks Child Benefit
    plus i will lose my 25% Council Tax relief which will cost me an extra 23 a month

    so all in all 826 a month down!

    I take home 1200 a month from my job and this will be what I have to live on. I rent my house, a very modest 2 bedroom, no garden, terraced house for 595 a month so after rent and council tax I am left with about 500 for all other bills and to live on. I cant move as my daughter will still be living with me and needs a bedroom.

    My daughter plans to work and will contribute to the house but obviously she wont be contributing anything near 800.

    Any ideas on whether I am entitled to anything or whether my daughter would be entitled to claim anything to help or just how an earth I am mean to survive!!

    Thank you in advance

    Jac
Page 1
    • mr_munchem
    • By mr_munchem 11th Jan 18, 9:43 AM
    • 95 Posts
    • 33 Thanks
    mr_munchem
    • #2
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:43 AM
    • #2
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:43 AM
    Maybe a statement of affairs showing your monthly outgoings would help us to make some more suggestions?
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 11th Jan 18, 9:44 AM
    • 2,845 Posts
    • 2,808 Thanks
    poppy12345
    • #3
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:44 AM
    • #3
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:44 AM
    Hello

    I guess i am looking for advance advice/help! My daughter will be 18 next March (2019) and is currently in full time education, when she turns 18 I will loose a substantial amount of money a month as follows:

    396 per month Child maintenance
    75 per week Working/Child Tax Credits
    82 per 4 weeks Child Benefit
    plus i will lose my 25% Council Tax relief which will cost me an extra 23 a month

    so all in all 826 a month down!

    I take home 1200 a month from my job and this will be what I have to live on. I rent my house, a very modest 2 bedroom, no garden, terraced house for 595 a month so after rent and council tax I am left with about 500 for all other bills and to live on. I cant move as my daughter will still be living with me and needs a bedroom.

    My daughter plans to work and will contribute to the house but obviously she wont be contributing anything near 800.

    Any ideas on whether I am entitled to anything or whether my daughter would be entitled to claim anything to help or just how an earth I am mean to survive!!

    Thank you in advance

    Jac
    Originally posted by Jaclynsurrey
    If your daughter continues in full time approved eduction or training, then all your benefits will continue until her 20th birthday.
    https://www.gov.uk/child-tax-credit-when-child-reaches-16
    • Jaclynsurrey
    • By Jaclynsurrey 11th Jan 18, 9:48 AM
    • 2 Posts
    • 2 Thanks
    Jaclynsurrey
    • #4
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:48 AM
    • #4
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:48 AM
    Unfortunately it only carries on if she stays in college not university, if that's what she decided to do.

    But thank you for the information it was useful
    • elsien
    • By elsien 11th Jan 18, 9:58 AM
    • 16,568 Posts
    • 41,824 Thanks
    elsien
    • #5
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:58 AM
    • #5
    • 11th Jan 18, 9:58 AM
    Is the other parent willing to continue to contribute directly to your daughter if she stays in education/goes to university? I know there's no legal obligation, but some parents choose to support their children for longer. That would allow her to pay you more for her keep while she's at home with you.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Darksparkle
    • By Darksparkle 11th Jan 18, 10:15 AM
    • 5,127 Posts
    • 3,326 Thanks
    Darksparkle
    • #6
    • 11th Jan 18, 10:15 AM
    • #6
    • 11th Jan 18, 10:15 AM
    How many hours do you work per week? What!!!8217;s your taxable income for the year?

    If she!!!8217;s going to uni will she have a student loan?
    • NotSuchASmugMarriedNow
    • By NotSuchASmugMarriedNow 11th Jan 18, 10:31 AM
    • 575 Posts
    • 1,112 Thanks
    NotSuchASmugMarriedNow
    • #7
    • 11th Jan 18, 10:31 AM
    • #7
    • 11th Jan 18, 10:31 AM
    Surely you've been working towards upskilling and retraining so that you can find better paid work? you've still got well over 12 months to do this. - it's not as if its a surprise that children become adults. What were your plans to increase your income when your child reached 18 and all the money ended?

    If you daughter is about 18 then you must be 36 at least. 1200 is a minimum wage, entry level job more usually carried out by a youngster? Is there any reason you are still in an entry level job 20 years after you left school.

    I don't mean to be harsh but look upon this as a wake up call. Exactly what have you been doing to improve your earning capacity over your adult life?
    Last edited by NotSuchASmugMarriedNow; 11-01-2018 at 10:37 AM.
    Overactively underachieving for almost half a century
    • Cheeky_Monkey
    • By Cheeky_Monkey 11th Jan 18, 11:20 AM
    • 1,694 Posts
    • 3,578 Thanks
    Cheeky_Monkey
    • #8
    • 11th Jan 18, 11:20 AM
    • #8
    • 11th Jan 18, 11:20 AM
    So you're currently receiving about 2k per month and there's only two of you

    Haven't you got any savings? Otherwise, what on earth are you doing with all that money? You've got plenty of time between now and March 2019 to save as much money as you can.

    I see no reason why you should continue to be subsidised by the taxpayer. You'll just have to cut your spending and live within your means like everyone else has to.
    I used to be indecisive - now I'm not so sure
    • CurlySue2017
    • By CurlySue2017 11th Jan 18, 11:36 AM
    • 114 Posts
    • 127 Thanks
    CurlySue2017
    • #9
    • 11th Jan 18, 11:36 AM
    • #9
    • 11th Jan 18, 11:36 AM
    Surely you've been working towards upskilling and retraining so that you can find better paid work? you've still got well over 12 months to do this. - it's not as if its a surprise that children become adults. What were your plans to increase your income when your child reached 18 and all the money ended?

    If you daughter is about 18 then you must be 36 at least. 1200 is a minimum wage, entry level job more usually carried out by a youngster? Is there any reason you are still in an entry level job 20 years after you left school.

    I don't mean to be harsh but look upon this as a wake up call. Exactly what have you been doing to improve your earning capacity over your adult life?
    Originally posted by NotSuchASmugMarriedNow
    So you're currently receiving about 2k per month and there's only two of you

    Haven't you got any savings? Otherwise, what on earth are you doing with all that money? You've got plenty of time between now and March 2019 to save as much money as you can.

    I see no reason why you should continue to be subsidised by the taxpayer. You'll just have to cut your spending and live within your means like everyone else has to.
    Originally posted by Cheeky_Monkey
    I agree with both of these posts.

    If you were the Dad instead of the Mum and were struggling financially, people would not be so quick to offer advice.

    They would be telling you to up and move to a cheaper area and reduce your bills so that you can afford to live within your means.....whatever that takes.

    Look at the child support board for MANY examples of this.

    Equality and all that eh!
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 11th Jan 18, 12:03 PM
    • 16,729 Posts
    • 41,345 Thanks
    FBaby
    All the 800 you've received so far were to cover costs directly associated with your daughter not you. When she works she'll have to pay her way. If that 800 was used to cover your individual costs then that was wrong and it's right it should come to an end

    You'll have to increase your hours, look for a better paid job, charged your DD accordingly. You might still be entitled to tax credits and housing benefits. Most lot you'll have to adjust your lifestyle.
    • poppy12345
    • By poppy12345 11th Jan 18, 12:48 PM
    • 2,845 Posts
    • 2,808 Thanks
    poppy12345
    Unfortunately it only carries on if she stays in college not university, if that's what she decided to do.

    But thank you for the information it was useful
    Originally posted by Jaclynsurrey
    If she's going to uni then most students have a students loan for this. They're also not in uni 5 days a week, so they can work pat time alongside this. Most students have to do this to boost their money. If she's planning on living at home during uni then she'll have to contribute for her keep.
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 11th Jan 18, 6:26 PM
    • 5,427 Posts
    • 7,603 Thanks
    deannatrois
    When I was in the same situation, I still received child maintenance (a lot less lol) whilst my son was in full time education. You won't lose that, as said, unless they go to university.

    If they are in university, assuming they will live in halls should be almost self supporting. However watch out for them spending the loan the first month (mine did) and you still having to send money (I did and I'm on benefits and like you, getting a lot less money, I just had to cut back). You also have to be prepared to pay #250 deposit on accommodation etc, first couple of weeks support whilst waiting for loan to come through (so love freshers week.., not. Went into the shared kitchen and saw a table covered in enough bottles of spirits to open a brewery that I haven't been able to afford for years). University is inevitably a strain for the parent. I had to collect my son a couple of times when he couldn't cope - that wasn't fun when I had no extra money lol. My son is a bit autistic, so needs more support but you will need some emergency money set aside just in case.

    Encourage them to get a job during the long holiday - actively lol. There are also on campus jobs, regular and irregular (helping out with open days) that will give them some sort of income too.

    If they aren't at university yet, I am afraid you will have to start saving, hard. Its what I did. You will be poorer, its inevitable. How well you prepare will make the difference. Not being patronising or tell you what to do, just passing on my experience. Its hard, I know. Went into overdraft for the first time for years this Xmas inspite of being very careful what I spent on Xmas (a third of what I normally spend).
    Last edited by deannatrois; 11-01-2018 at 6:39 PM.
    • pipkin71
    • By pipkin71 11th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    • 19,360 Posts
    • 87,163 Thanks
    pipkin71
    Hello

    I guess i am looking for advance advice/help! My daughter will be 18 next March (2019) and is currently in full time education, when she turns 18 I will loose a substantial amount of money a month as follows:

    396 per month Child maintenance
    75 per week Working/Child Tax Credits
    82 per 4 weeks Child Benefit
    plus i will lose my 25% Council Tax relief which will cost me an extra 23 a month

    so all in all 826 a month down!

    I take home 1200 a month from my job and this will be what I have to live on. I rent my house, a very modest 2 bedroom, no garden, terraced house for 595 a month so after rent and council tax I am left with about 500 for all other bills and to live on. I cant move as my daughter will still be living with me and needs a bedroom.

    My daughter plans to work and will contribute to the house but obviously she wont be contributing anything near 800.

    Any ideas on whether I am entitled to anything or whether my daughter would be entitled to claim anything to help or just how an earth I am mean to survive!!

    Thank you in advance

    Jac
    Originally posted by Jaclynsurrey
    It is a big change but it is surprising how you adapt My girls are 19 and 20 so I know where you're coming from I would suggest that, if possible, try and build up some savings. If your daughter is in college, although she is 18 in March, child related benefits won't end until the end of August / beginning of September 2019.

    Have a look at reducing any debts, if you have them; reduce outgoings. The old style board is great for ways of cutting down on grocery spends. Check you have the best energy tariff and keep a spending diary to see if you are wasting money without realising.

    I started preparing in the twelve months before the eldest finished college, so the shortfall - although noticeable at first - didn't leave us in any hardship.

    Good luck with it all
    There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they'll take you - Beatrix Potter
    • deannatrois
    • By deannatrois 11th Jan 18, 7:27 PM
    • 5,427 Posts
    • 7,603 Thanks
    deannatrois
    sorry yes, to go through things in more detail

    You won't lose child benefit, child maintenance, child tax credits while your daughter is under 20 and in further education.

    While she is a student full stop, you will still receive council tax 25% discount.

    I think you are acting on false information.

    You will lose the benefits once she goes to university.

    As she isn't even 18 yet, you DO have time to reduce your outgoings, increase your income and save.
    • pipkin71
    • By pipkin71 11th Jan 18, 7:38 PM
    • 19,360 Posts
    • 87,163 Thanks
    pipkin71
    sorry yes, to go through things in more detail

    You won't lose child benefit, child maintenance, child tax credits while your daughter is under 20 and in further education.

    While she is a student full stop, you will still receive council tax 25% discount.

    I think you are acting on false information.

    You will lose the benefits once she goes to university.

    As she isn't even 18 yet, you DO have time to reduce your outgoings, increase your income and save.
    Originally posted by deannatrois
    I should have also said, if she stays at college until 19, child related benefits won't end until August / September 2020
    There is something delicious about writing the first words of a story. You never quite know where they'll take you - Beatrix Potter
    • FBaby
    • By FBaby 12th Jan 18, 7:41 AM
    • 16,729 Posts
    • 41,345 Thanks
    FBaby
    OP has stated her DD plans to work not go to Uni. She will therefore be in a position to contribute. The issue is that the share of the costs wont come to the 800 she is currently getting so won't get that from her DD. At least the situation will make her ex happy he doesnt have to pay almost 400 a month any longer.
    • Darksparkle
    • By Darksparkle 12th Jan 18, 9:20 AM
    • 5,127 Posts
    • 3,326 Thanks
    Darksparkle
    OP has stated her DD plans to work not go to Uni. She will therefore be in a position to contribute. The issue is that the share of the costs wont come to the 800 she is currently getting so won't get that from her DD. At least the situation will make her ex happy he doesnt have to pay almost 400 a month any longer.
    Originally posted by FBaby
    Post 4 seems to suggest shes not made up her mind about uni.
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 12th Jan 18, 10:28 AM
    • 2,970 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    Comms69
    I am surprised the amount of kids who go to uni whether they can afford it or not. There should be far fewer going and only if they have exceptional talent. Also making sure that the degree they choose will get them a proper job when they complete course. I feel far too many kids get themselves into long term debt taking years to have to pay it off.
    Originally posted by skcollobcat10
    Adults.... They're all 18.
    • Tabbytabitha
    • By Tabbytabitha 12th Jan 18, 10:47 AM
    • 2,644 Posts
    • 4,375 Thanks
    Tabbytabitha
    Unfortunately it only carries on if she stays in college not university, if that's what she decided to do.

    But thank you for the information it was useful
    Originally posted by Jaclynsurrey
    But once she's at university (if she stays at home) she'll receive a maintenance loan that will enable her to pay all her expenses so that your total outgoings will go down at the same time as your income does.
    • Darksparkle
    • By Darksparkle 12th Jan 18, 11:06 AM
    • 5,127 Posts
    • 3,326 Thanks
    Darksparkle
    I am surprised the amount of kids who go to uni whether they can afford it or not. There should be far fewer going and only if they have exceptional talent. Also making sure that the degree they choose will get them a proper job when they complete course. I feel far too many kids get themselves into long term debt taking years to have to pay it off.
    Originally posted by skcollobcat10
    When I was at school it was just assumed youd go to uni (if you were passing exams). There wasnt a conversation about whether you actually wanted to go or not. Just that you were going and you had to pick a subject.
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