Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@. Skimlinks & other affiliated links are turned on

Search

Results: Evict the frog?

Evict him

8.60% • 8 votes

Leave him alone

91.40% • 85 votes

You may not vote on this poll

93 votes in total.

  • FIRST POST
    • stator
    • By stator 10th Jan 18, 4:58 PM
    • 6,303Posts
    • 4,195Thanks
    stator
    Frog in my garden. Evict or not?
    • #1
    • 10th Jan 18, 4:58 PM
    Frog in my garden. Evict or not? 10th Jan 18 at 4:58 PM
    I have a frog in my garden.
    The thing is, he can't get out, so I'm not sure whether to leave him be or catch and release him into the woodland a few hundred yards from the end of my garden.

    My garden is fully enclosed with 2m high walls and fencing. There's no way he can get out.
    My garden is pretty large, 12m long, 8m wide, but it's mostly unmown grass, a few other plants. No pond, so he can't breed.
    I guess he must be eating slugs or woodlouse and/or ants, these are the only food for him in my garden AFAIK.

    What do you think?

    Catch and release or leave alone?
    Changing the world, one sarcastic comment at a time.
Page 2
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 11th Jan 18, 8:34 AM
    • 1,459 Posts
    • 1,368 Thanks
    Grenage
    With woodland so close, it would seem sensible to relocate.

    Alternatively, build a pond, plant lots of cover, and create small access holes.
    • spo2
    • By spo2 11th Jan 18, 9:47 AM
    • 124 Posts
    • 35 Thanks
    spo2
    I would move him on - just because I would be terrified of stepping on him if I was outside (especially in the dark!)
    • emilybc
    • By emilybc 11th Jan 18, 12:09 PM
    • 36 Posts
    • 195 Thanks
    emilybc
    What you might like to do is cut a little hole at the bottom of one of your fenceposts so that he can get in and out - somewhere not visible from your house for aesthetic reasons.

    It's good practice as it means wildlife can access your garden - particularly hedgehogs, who are massively in decline at the moment!
    • Wassa123
    • By Wassa123 11th Jan 18, 6:01 PM
    • 339 Posts
    • 161 Thanks
    Wassa123
    Iíve seen many a frog on my land. No idea how they got here though.
    • nickcc
    • By nickcc 11th Jan 18, 8:41 PM
    • 1,803 Posts
    • 799 Thanks
    nickcc
    Found loads of frogspawn in our garden one year, Daughters wanted to save it so moved it to a few large buckets. When it turned in to tadpoles we fed them with fish food, we eventually ended up with a garden full of noisy baby frogs, fortunately we also had a large fish pond so frogs more than happy. I also understand that relocating frogspawn is against regulations as it can spread diseases, so dumping it in your local duck pond is not allowed.
    • JohnB47
    • By JohnB47 11th Jan 18, 9:28 PM
    • 1,005 Posts
    • 317 Thanks
    JohnB47
    I'm of the impression that a creature that has decendants many millions of years older than mine is perfectly capable of finding its way around, despite the piffling barriers we humans place in his/her way, You need to override your natural need to 'save' this creature and leave it alone.
    • robatwork
    • By robatwork 11th Jan 18, 10:14 PM
    • 4,409 Posts
    • 4,915 Thanks
    robatwork
    Kiss it....
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 11th Jan 18, 10:24 PM
    • 25,314 Posts
    • 93,079 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Kiss it....
    Originally posted by robatwork
    Just be careful. If it turns into a smart, princely-looking gentleman, you may need more than a bucket to relocate him!
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs and use Firefox, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it yet....
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 12th Jan 18, 3:10 AM
    • 3,188 Posts
    • 8,090 Thanks
    tori.k
    He will be fine, I have quite a few here, but do provided a woodpile corner for them i have a 6ft walled garden and gates next door has the pond so they must happily make there way between the two as I've never had piles of froggy bodies lying around.
    Just be careful when you cut the grass for the first time, it's horrible if you catch one with the strimmer.
    Debit to Credit (stage 1) 3652.34 completed 15/10/16
    Debit to Credit (stage 2) 6299.09 completed 25/06/17
    Mortgage Free (stage 3) 140000/ 1500
    Save 12k in 2018 #76 3000/6000
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 12th Jan 18, 9:37 AM
    • 7,988 Posts
    • 13,795 Thanks
    andrewf75
    As others have said its a good idea to have a hole under your fence for animals to get through. Ideally make it hedgehog sized.
    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 15th Jan 18, 8:30 AM
    • 4,244 Posts
    • 5,672 Thanks
    sillygoose
    Relocate!

    When we bought our house it had a corner pond they bred in every year we had a lawn-carpet of noisy frogs everywhere, lawn, paths you couldn't move without treading on them. The racket used to keep us awake at night.

    So we removed the pond but for years after they kept coming back the same, they don't need open water, they laid plenty of spawn in very damp soil even, plant pots, all over.

    After a few years of relocating bucket loads every night they were stopped for good. Oh what fun.
    • inglorius
    • By inglorius 15th Jan 18, 8:44 AM
    • 158 Posts
    • 32 Thanks
    inglorius
    Better than a frog in your throat I guess
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 15th Jan 18, 11:42 AM
    • 7,988 Posts
    • 13,795 Thanks
    andrewf75
    Relocate!

    When we bought our house it had a corner pond they bred in every year we had a lawn-carpet of noisy frogs everywhere, lawn, paths you couldn't move without treading on them. The racket used to keep us awake at night.

    So we removed the pond but for years after they kept coming back the same, they don't need open water, they laid plenty of spawn in very damp soil even, plant pots, all over.

    After a few years of relocating bucket loads every night they were stopped for good. Oh what fun.
    Originally posted by sillygoose
    What a shame. I'm really trying to get frogs to breed in my pond. Never ceases to amaze me how people actually want rid of wildlife from their gardens especially species which are really struggling.
    • nickcc
    • By nickcc 15th Jan 18, 3:32 PM
    • 1,803 Posts
    • 799 Thanks
    nickcc
    What a shame. I'm really trying to get frogs to breed in my pond. Never ceases to amaze me how people actually want rid of wildlife from their gardens especially species which are really struggling.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    The problem I had was that we had filled the pond in due to the risk to our young Grandchildren. As a previous post the frogs still came back and left the frogspawn where the pond used to be so relocating it was essential.
    • andrewf75
    • By andrewf75 15th Jan 18, 4:26 PM
    • 7,988 Posts
    • 13,795 Thanks
    andrewf75
    The problem I had was that we had filled the pond in due to the risk to our young Grandchildren. As a previous post the frogs still came back and left the frogspawn where the pond used to be so relocating it was essential.
    Originally posted by nickcc
    Obviously kids are a valid reason not to have a pond, I was responding to the poster who (it sounded like) removed the pond because they didnít like the frogs!
    I found a good solution to the children issue actually. You can get plastic grid things to put over the pond.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 15th Jan 18, 4:30 PM
    • 25,314 Posts
    • 93,079 Thanks
    Davesnave
    I found a good solution to the children issue actually. You can get plastic grid things to put over the pond.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    Or you can do what we did and let them fall in under supervision.

    They don't do it twice!
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs and use Firefox, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it yet....
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • Grenage
    • By Grenage 15th Jan 18, 4:44 PM
    • 1,459 Posts
    • 1,368 Thanks
    Grenage
    It's madness how worried parents are that children will end up floating face-down in anything more than an inch of water.

    When we sold the last place we had to remove the pond - it was putting many people off. Admittedly it was a bit large for the garden....

    Putting one in the new garden was one of the first things I did.
    • Davesnave
    • By Davesnave 15th Jan 18, 5:10 PM
    • 25,314 Posts
    • 93,079 Thanks
    Davesnave
    Shallow-edged ponds of the wildlife variety are not very dangerous. Stupid ponds, like barrels sunk in the ground, often are.

    I am a nephew short due to one of those.
    If you are finding huge gaps between your paragraphs and use Firefox, MSE know about the problem. However, they aren't necessarily doing anything about it yet....
    https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5844460
    • sillygoose
    • By sillygoose 15th Jan 18, 5:27 PM
    • 4,244 Posts
    • 5,672 Thanks
    sillygoose
    What a shame. I'm really trying to get frogs to breed in my pond. Never ceases to amaze me how people actually want rid of wildlife from their gardens especially species which are really struggling.
    Originally posted by andrewf75
    I removed it also because it took up too much room and as previous owners had neglected it it was foul, smelly and in a poor state, never mind drowning, I didn't want the kids to be poisoned.

    Don't feel too sad for the poor froggies, we nearly back onto a nature reserve with a myriad of shallow, slow running streams and gullys perfect for them and a lot nicer than the stagnant old cess pit in my garden.

    We all came out winners.
    • DigForVictory
    • By DigForVictory 15th Jan 18, 9:03 PM
    • 7,819 Posts
    • 23,018 Thanks
    DigForVictory
    Frog got into the garden & there is some shelter. When food runs out, frog will get out somehow, or get eaten.

    (Frog indoors gets relocated to garden stat.)

    Awed that you have a cat proof garden.
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

2,580Posts Today

6,426Users online

Martin's Twitter