Your browser isn't supported
It looks like you're using an old web browser. To get the most out of the site and to ensure guides display correctly, we suggest upgrading your browser now. Download the latest:

Welcome to the MSE Forums

We're home to a fantastic community of MoneySavers but anyone can post. Please exercise caution & report spam, illegal, offensive or libellous posts/messages: click "report" or email forumteam@.

Search
  • FIRST POST
    • Mgman1965
    • By Mgman1965 9th Jan 18, 11:13 AM
    • 105Posts
    • 107Thanks
    Mgman1965
    Country living, yes or no ?
    • #1
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:13 AM
    Country living, yes or no ? 9th Jan 18 at 11:13 AM
    I'm in my early 50's and always lived in towns or 5here immediate vicinity.

    Having holidayed in rural cottages and an avid viewer of escape to the country type programmes on TV have been looking online at rural houses for sale fairly local to me.

    Problem is, OH is not seeming as keen and says these programmes are always filmed in the summer when it warm and sunny, never when it's biting cold, blowing a gale, been raining for a week and a sea of mud or a foot of snow and ice with untreated roads for miles and the no mains sewer or gas for the heating.

    Also she says, no popping to the supermarket or takeaway if you fancy a kebab/fish and chips and would practically need two cars at least one a decent 4×4.

    I (she says) I see only what they want you to see, the hot sunny summer days sitting outside on the fresh cut lawn, not the Sept to May times.

    Is she right or trying to put me off.
Page 1
    • Eric_the_half_a_bee
    • By Eric_the_half_a_bee 9th Jan 18, 11:17 AM
    • 1,143 Posts
    • 5,894 Thanks
    Eric_the_half_a_bee
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:17 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:17 AM
    You could live on the edge of a small town and have very easy access to as much countryside as you want.
    • CommitedToChange
    • By CommitedToChange 9th Jan 18, 11:26 AM
    • 1,289 Posts
    • 4,022 Thanks
    CommitedToChange
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:26 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:26 AM
    She is right - though I think she's trying to be more realistic than put you off. Tv shows always show it in the best light.

    I love the idea of living in the countryside, but when I really think about it - the bad weather in winter, possibly being cut off due to it. No take outs or being able to nip to the shop or cinema whenever I want, I realise it's not for me.

    As Eric says you could live on the edge of a small town and try to find a compromise.
    Attempting to buy a house
    • giraffe69
    • By giraffe69 9th Jan 18, 11:29 AM
    • 2,384 Posts
    • 2,066 Thanks
    giraffe69
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:29 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:29 AM
    She's trying to put you off! We moved from city (60+ years of living in one) to village around 5 years ago. We rejected an otherwise nice house because of no gas and a sewage tank. No shortage of other choices. Yes, there are downsides. You could die waiting for a bus, for example but the air is cleaner, plenty of walks (not that muddy even in Jan) and overall a better lifestyle and more space for your £. I agree two cars is essential. We do short journeys by bike now and may get more adventurous this year. The local takeaway is a short drive not a walk and the roads, for the most part, are treated.
    • Waterlily24
    • By Waterlily24 9th Jan 18, 11:30 AM
    • 942 Posts
    • 497 Thanks
    Waterlily24
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:30 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:30 AM
    We live in the countryside and love it. Moved from a small town within walking distance.

    We have one shop about a 20 minute walk away and the nearest town is about 7 miles away for the weekly shop. We used to have a bus service but that went a while ago. I think there might be 1 on a Saturday nowadays.

    I don't drive but hubby does.

    We've lived in the area for over 20 years and still love it.

    It's very flat here so we don't need a 4 x 4 but there are a lot around as it's a farming area.

    We don't have any very near neighbours and live just outside the village in what's classed as countryside.
    • Pixie5740
    • By Pixie5740 9th Jan 18, 11:33 AM
    • 12,171 Posts
    • 17,191 Thanks
    Pixie5740
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:33 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:33 AM
    I grew up in a village in a single car household (not a 4x4). Trapped is the way I remember feeling as did my mother. I'm not sure the DVLA will renew my father's driving licence when he turns 70 which will make getting around difficult for him. The village no longer has a post office or the branch of any bank or building society, the nearest ones require two different bus services to reach. There is a gunsmiths though.

    That's not to say there aren't plus points of living a rural life and it might be right for you. You could always try renting somewhere rural longer term to see how you get on.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 9th Jan 18, 12:04 PM
    • 17,602 Posts
    • 15,963 Thanks
    AdrianC
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:04 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:04 PM
    We've lived in the boonies of the Welsh borders for the last five years, 100m in altitude up a hill with grass up the middle of the lane. We used to live in a small commuterland town, with the M25 a mile away, and a tube station at the end of the road.

    We were snowed in before Xmas for three days. Where we used to be, the road was impassable because of snow for several days on a couple of occasions.

    We're five miles from the nearest supermarket. Where we used to be, we were five miles from the nearest supermarket - but the traffic was much greater and took much longer.

    We're now on a septic tank. It gets emptied once every few years.

    We're now on an LPG tank. It gets filled a couple of times a year.

    There's no pub within easy walking distance, but the community here is far stronger. SWMBO grew up in that town - we know far more people here, and we know them much better.

    Ain't no way we'd ever go back.
    • PasturesNew
    • By PasturesNew 9th Jan 18, 12:08 PM
    • 62,786 Posts
    • 367,920 Thanks
    PasturesNew
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:08 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:08 PM
    You can "faux test" it .... starting today you can ban yourselves from using any shops/services within a 5-6 mile radius - forcing yourself EVERY time to access what's in another town.

    Not allowed to "pop out to" any of your local services/shops... nor even to "take a stroll round town" without having to go to another place.

    Find somewhere 5-6 miles away and say "pretend that's our nearest place" .... see how long you last.
    • StaffieTerrier
    • By StaffieTerrier 9th Jan 18, 12:08 PM
    • 321 Posts
    • 545 Thanks
    StaffieTerrier
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:08 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:08 PM
    I live on the edge of a small village. I have fields at the back of me and a view of fields in front. It's a 5 minute walk to the centre of the village, where there's a handful of shops and takeaways. We're also on a regular bus route to the local town 3 miles away. We have the best of both worlds
    • Slinky
    • By Slinky 9th Jan 18, 12:14 PM
    • 5,240 Posts
    • 24,218 Thanks
    Slinky
    I too love ETTC but would I want to....... no. We're on the outskirts of a small town/large village at the moment. 15 minutes walk to the shops. We've bought a house to retire to that's in a larger town. We're 5 mins walk from leisure centre, 2 mins from doctors, 8 mins from a lovely shopping street with nice pubs and restaurants, 5 mins walk from the river. 20 minutes drive to the coast. It's all on a flat level so no hills to struggle up. 1 minute to a bus stop. We drive at the moment but in 20 years may not. It would be easy enough to get around on a mobility scooter.

    We'll be moving so we're closer to things we want and need rather than further away.
    • Mgman1965
    • By Mgman1965 9th Jan 18, 12:19 PM
    • 105 Posts
    • 107 Thanks
    Mgman1965
    Many of the villages around my area within the last 5-8yrs have lost their shops and post offices, and since austerity hit us, the bus services have been decimated to nothing as council cuts subsidies and the bus companies then axe them.

    My other worry is my budget, what I'd get for my nice, decent size 3 bed 1930's semi with off-road parking anf garage in town it seems will only get me a small 2 bed cottage with a small garden in a nice unspoilt village.
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 9th Jan 18, 12:21 PM
    • 17,602 Posts
    • 15,963 Thanks
    AdrianC
    My other worry is my budget, what I'd get for my nice, decent size 3 bed 1930's semi with off-road parking anf garage in town it seems will only get me a small 2 bed cottage with a small garden in a nice unspoilt village.
    Originally posted by Mgman1965
    The flipside to that is that we sold our suburban 70m2 house with minimal garden for 1.5x what we paid for a glorious 18th century 200m2 house in 1.5 acres...
    • ReadingTim
    • By ReadingTim 9th Jan 18, 12:35 PM
    • 2,729 Posts
    • 3,904 Thanks
    ReadingTim
    Is she right or trying to put me off.
    Originally posted by Mgman1965
    Dunno - is the glass half empty or half full...?
    • hazyjo
    • By hazyjo 9th Jan 18, 12:39 PM
    • 10,626 Posts
    • 13,872 Thanks
    hazyjo
    It's not so much the things you fancy (a kebab, etc) as the things you need that will be a prob. We're quite good at stocking up on things but what are you like now for having to just nip to the shop/DIY store for an item you've forgotten or run out of? If something breaks, how good are you at fixing it? How easy will it be to find local tradespeople?


    I like being somewhere quiet, but could (prob!) never be away from a pub/bar, restaurant and shops - all walking distance.


    How much time do you spend with friends and family? You may find yourself cutting yourselves off from them somewhat.
    2018 wins: Single Malt Whisky; theatre tickets; festival tickets; year of gin(!); shoes
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 9th Jan 18, 12:46 PM
    • 11,101 Posts
    • 29,657 Thanks
    suki1964
    I grew up in London , I was used to public transport , 24 HR shopping and takeaways everywhere, instant hot water and heating that didn't cost the earth, cable broadband, mains sewers etc

    And I now live in a tiny hamlet at the foot of the Glens of Antrim and have never been happier

    Nearest petrol station/shop is 4 miles away
    Town is 5 miles away
    Any town with a choice of chain stores is 17 miles away
    Major cities with proper hospitals, theatres, etc 45 miles away

    Septic tank gets emptied once a year FOC but really only needs doing every few years if it's working properly

    Electricity is via overhead cables and power cuts are normal

    No gas, so it's oil, which can be very very expensive depending on oil prices and coal and logs, neither are cheap, both are dirty and cover your house is dust

    Broadband just means a connection in the country, high speed really depends on where you live. I finally got high speed last year (12 years with speeds of 512 before then )

    Roads untreated mainly in the winter. Ours used to get gritted part of the way where the bus came through, but now we don't have a bus service so we are at the back of the queue

    2010, we were 'snowed in' for three weeks. When the thaw came so did the burst water mains , no water for another week. It was so cold that winter the oil in the tank froze

    There's no saying sod it, I'm ordering Chinese , no one delivers here. The postman arrives around 2pm and he will bring a newspaper with him if you want and he does take your post with him

    But as Adrian says, it's the community that keeps you. It takes a while, but slowly your town/city ways fade and you embrace what you have

    We both have found jobs locally, in family businesses. Whilst they are low pay, who cares when it's a five minute drive and you are treated as a valuable member of the work force and part of the family? My 7 mile commute in London took 70mins in the mornings by car, up to two hours by bus. My 8 hour days was really around 11 hrs , no time to enjoy the home I was working so hard to pay for

    I'm never later home then 4 and DH is home 4.15. In the summer months it's change clothes, feed the hens, and we can be on a beach by 4.45pm.

    The drive to the city takes 45 mins. It's the only time we see traffic

    Yes winters can be long and cold and wet, but what's not to love about them when you have a roaring fire and a home cooked meal?

    High fashion is swapped for good quality, hard wearing outside clothing

    That's not to say we don't like to get dressed up and party, there's always a party somewhere and the heels come out ( I've never been to so many weddings in my life for example, everyone gets invited) There's so much going on all year round, every village has their family days, all the YFC have bbqs and charity events. The councils spend a lot on events throughout the year that are FOC


    But best of all are your local neighbours. They are there for you as you become there for them. A real community

    I'm dreading the day when I become to old to drive and will have to move to a town
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • Mojisola
    • By Mojisola 9th Jan 18, 12:51 PM
    • 29,368 Posts
    • 74,979 Thanks
    Mojisola
    Have you had any self-catering holidays in the kind of area you think you’d like to move to in the depths of winter?
    • suki1964
    • By suki1964 9th Jan 18, 12:51 PM
    • 11,101 Posts
    • 29,657 Thanks
    suki1964
    The flipside to that is that we sold our suburban 70m2 house with minimal garden for 1.5x what we paid for a glorious 18th century 200m2 house in 1.5 acres...
    Originally posted by AdrianC

    Same here, we sold our mid terrace 2up2 down heavily mortgaged house for a five bedroom, 3 bath, 3 receptions in a 1/3 acre with a tiny mortgage which was paid off in 5 years
    if you lend someone £20 and never see that person again, it was probably worth it
    • sleepymans
    • By sleepymans 9th Jan 18, 1:15 PM
    • 739 Posts
    • 1,119 Thanks
    sleepymans
    When OH and I had busy pressured jobs we really enjoyed coming home to our rural cottage with country view, peace and quiet and fresh air. Those were our priorities then...
    Since retiring we realised there wasn't enough "life" and stimulation in the country and the house and garden were a drain on our energies and financial resources.
    We moved to a smallish town, downsized to a more modern easy to run single story house with easy to maintain gardens. We are close to all services and amenities, enjoy theatres, restaurants and all manner of social opportunities. We chose a property with wonderful views from every window and can reach wonderful countryside within minutes if we ever fancy a bit of country living.

    I guess the answer is to choose the right location for access to the things you wish to spend most of your life doing....and that suits your resources.
    Goddess
    • AdrianC
    • By AdrianC 9th Jan 18, 1:19 PM
    • 17,602 Posts
    • 15,963 Thanks
    AdrianC
    No gas, so it's oil, which can be very very expensive depending on oil prices
    Originally posted by suki1964
    Gas is an option - it just lives in a tank or bottles.

    and coal and logs, neither are cheap, both are dirty and cover your house is dust
    Logs? They're free. You just have to stop 'em being big chunks of tree, and point them in the direction of being logs. Think of it as being like the gym, but free...

    Broadband just means a connection in the country, high speed really depends on where you live. I finally got high speed last year (12 years with speeds of 512 before then )
    Rural high-speed broadband is very big news - we moved to fibre-to-the-premises (rock solid 50Mbit) 18mo ago. Friends in towns get far, FAR worse than that.

    But best of all are your local neighbours. They are there for you as you become there for them. A real community

    I'm dreading the day when I become to old to drive and will have to move to a town
    You'll be fine. The neighbours will be there for you.
    • Smodlet
    • By Smodlet 9th Jan 18, 1:21 PM
    • 3,166 Posts
    • 6,284 Thanks
    Smodlet
    Another thing to think about might be the distance to the nearest hospital and how long would it take an ambulance to get you there, should you need it. Also how far is the nearest GP's surgery/dentist/vet if applicable.
    What is this life if, sweet wordsmith, we have no time to take the pith?
    Every stew starts with the first onion.
    I took it upon myself to investigate a trifle; it had custard, jelly, soggy sponge things...
Welcome to our new Forum!

Our aim is to save you money quickly and easily. We hope you like it!

Forum Team Contact us

Live Stats

1,511Posts Today

8,063Users online

Martin's Twitter