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  • FIRST POST
    • adonis10
    • By adonis10 9th Jan 18, 9:45 AM
    • 1,570Posts
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    adonis10
    New car dilemma
    • #1
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:45 AM
    New car dilemma 9th Jan 18 at 9:45 AM
    Newbie to the forum looking for advice!


    Firstly, I am not overly bothered about having a flash car or what others think of what I drive so my decision comes down to a few factors:

    - does it look nice, relatively 'sporty'. Well, when I say 'sporty' I just mean it is not really boring and dull.
    - how does it drive?
    - price and longevity.
    - running costs and depreciation.

    In my 17 years of driving I've had only 3 cars (5 years, 8 years and 4 years) with the first two being used until no longer economically viable so simply part exchanged in for a few hundred at the time of buying the new one. My current car is a 3 door 2.0 TDci Focus, 2007 plate with 99k on the clock. In the past year it has had a new clutch, water pump, brake discs, starter motor and battery so it is very well maintained. Also had a new cambelt on 80k. Some key items have been replaced which can only help me sell it for a fairly good price. On the flipside, having not long ago incurred these costs if I decide to replace it now I will have no chance of recouping this spend.


    I have been offered a 3 year old car which fits my criteria, albeit smaller than my current car, for a good £1,500 less than the general market value (in the family hence the generous price) which has only 9k on the clock and 2 very low use owners. Engine is much smaller which at first was a concern but on further inspection I have found that it is only 12bhp less than my current car, 0-60 difference is negligible. Running cost wise - zero tax, slightly cheaper insurance, probably more economical on fuel (although my research suggests that the mpg figures quoted are very ambitious, shall we say) but worst case scenario I would expect it to be no worse than the mpg that I currently get. Other benefits:
    - car is 7 years newer so obviously less chance of bigger ticket repairs in the immediate future
    - I could even sell it in 12-18 months and probably not lose much money given the discounted price I am buying it for.


    I do like my current car very much but understand that the older it gets, the more that needs to be repaired so it is an inevitability that costs will add up over the next few years and perhaps it is time to sell it whilst it has some trade in value.


    I am money conscious so hate the thought of having to shell out £5.5k (after selling my car) and depreciation concerns me, but this will apply to most cars (classics aside, which I cannot afford anyway). However, common sense suggests that over the next 2-3 years I will have to shell out 5-7k for a new car anyway so why not take advantage of a car that is some 15% cheaper than MV and I know that it has been very well looked after.

    Can anyone think of any other considerations that I may have missed? Advice and opinions welcomed.
Page 1
    • facade
    • By facade 9th Jan 18, 10:17 AM
    • 3,200 Posts
    • 1,686 Thanks
    facade
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:17 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:17 AM
    If it is the Ford ecoboost engine, make certain it has a full manufacturers service history, low mileage cars often miss the timed services.
    With an ecoboost that FSH is essential if you don't want to be paying for a new engine.

    Small powerful engines worry me in general, but I'm a bit of a Luddite in that respect.
    I want to go back to The Olden Days, when every single thing that I can think of was better.....

    (except air quality and Medical Science )
    • jk0
    • By jk0 9th Jan 18, 10:23 AM
    • 2,311 Posts
    • 24,805 Thanks
    jk0
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:23 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:23 AM
    I think after taking such care of your existing car, it's a shame to get rid of it. If it goes okay, and does not let you down, why change?
    • adonis10
    • By adonis10 9th Jan 18, 10:24 AM
    • 1,570 Posts
    • 204 Thanks
    adonis10
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:24 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:24 AM
    If it is the Ford ecoboost engine, make certain it has a full manufacturers service history, low mileage cars often miss the timed services.
    With an ecoboost that FSH is essential if you don't want to be paying for a new engine.

    Small powerful engines worry me in general, but I'm a bit of a Luddite in that respect.
    Originally posted by facade
    Excuse my ignorance but could you elaborate on this? What is the risk?
    • adonis10
    • By adonis10 9th Jan 18, 10:26 AM
    • 1,570 Posts
    • 204 Thanks
    adonis10
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:26 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:26 AM
    I think after taking such care of your existing car, it's a shame to get rid of it. If it goes okay, and does not let you down, why change?
    Originally posted by jk0
    Totally agree but it's almost 11 years old and who is to say that in another year or so I won't have to start replacing bigger items, in addition to another £500-700 depreciation when I would be looking at a very low sell on value. Also, the fact I am getting the car at a £1,500-1,750 discount is appealing.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 9th Jan 18, 10:52 AM
    • 24,300 Posts
    • 51,356 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:52 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:52 AM
    Have you told us the make and model of the car you are considering?
    • adonis10
    • By adonis10 9th Jan 18, 11:05 AM
    • 1,570 Posts
    • 204 Thanks
    adonis10
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:05 AM
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:05 AM
    Have you told us the make and model of the car you are considering?
    Originally posted by LandyAndy
    Sorry, I think I omitted that!


    Ford Fiesta 1.0 Ecoboost, 123bhp version, 2014.
    • LandyAndy
    • By LandyAndy 9th Jan 18, 11:12 AM
    • 24,300 Posts
    • 51,356 Thanks
    LandyAndy
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:12 AM
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:12 AM
    Excuse my ignorance but could you elaborate on this? What is the risk?
    Originally posted by adonis10

    Google 'Ford Ecoboost Engine Problems'. Plenty to look at.
    • bob_a_builder
    • By bob_a_builder 9th Jan 18, 11:41 AM
    • 1,580 Posts
    • 761 Thanks
    bob_a_builder
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:41 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:41 AM
    Starting here .....

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5612757
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 9th Jan 18, 11:46 AM
    • 3,019 Posts
    • 2,181 Thanks
    Tarambor
    But bear in mind that there's only 300 on the groups set up to complain about it and as of 2015 there were over 5,000,000 Ecoboost engines in use. if it was truly as bad as some are trying to claim that it is then the hard shoulders and laybys of the nation would be full of broken down Fords.
    • facade
    • By facade 9th Jan 18, 12:14 PM
    • 3,200 Posts
    • 1,686 Thanks
    facade
    Excuse my ignorance but could you elaborate on this? What is the risk?
    Originally posted by adonis10
    Very highly stressed little engine, many failures reported, there is even a thread on here

    http://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=5612757

    If you have the full Ford service history, you are in with a chance of a "goodwill" gesture when it breaks. As I said, low mileage cars tend to miss annual services because they "haven't done enough miles" and manufacturers love to point out that this has affected the warranty when there is a problem (obviously, the problem would have been spotted at the service, so would never have developed ).

    Still down to you, I'm afraid, your current car owes you money, so you really ought to drive it and get your money's worth, but if the Ford doesn't blow up you reckon you can punt it on in 12 months for what you pay now, so you get a nearly new car for effectively nothing.
    (Most of the ecoboosts don't blow up, but enough of them do to make it a bit of a lottery. Every car I've owned has suffered from the "common problems" that the owners groups mention, yet apparently the other 99% made didn't, so I'm just too unlucky to chance one, as I always pick the 1% er ).
    Last edited by facade; 09-01-2018 at 12:17 PM.
    I want to go back to The Olden Days, when every single thing that I can think of was better.....

    (except air quality and Medical Science )
    • jk0
    • By jk0 9th Jan 18, 12:24 PM
    • 2,311 Posts
    • 24,805 Thanks
    jk0
    Totally agree but it's almost 11 years old and who is to say that in another year or so I won't have to start replacing bigger items, in addition to another £500-700 depreciation when I would be looking at a very low sell on value. Also, the fact I am getting the car at a £1,500-1,750 discount is appealing.
    Originally posted by adonis10
    Hmm. I would not worry about depreciation on an 11 year old car. The value of your car is mostly to you, as you know it has been taken care of so far.
    • Jonesya
    • By Jonesya 9th Jan 18, 8:24 PM
    • 1,445 Posts
    • 886 Thanks
    Jonesya
    All cars can suffer failures and need repairs, it's the nature of the beast, new cars aren't immune.

    But most of the cost of a car is depreciation, with an old car there might be some extra repair costs but this is often more than offset by the negligible depreciation costs.

    And I'm not sure I'd trade a known quantity like your existing car for a 1L ecoboost, only because the only person I know who bought a brand new focus with one, had his fail on him within a year or two requiring an engine swap.
    • Navigator123
    • By Navigator123 9th Jan 18, 10:26 PM
    • 3 Posts
    • 1 Thanks
    Navigator123
    Try looking at a Skoda Fabia.

    Cheaper to insure and run than most mainstream manufacturers and built to last.

    Just make sure it has a decent service history and make sure you get a HPI check and an engineers inspection before you part with your hard earned.

    As a cash customer try the local Skoda dealership as you could get up to 20% off of the screen price.
    • ididntgetwhereiamtoday
    • By ididntgetwhereiamtoday 10th Jan 18, 6:07 AM
    • 1,128 Posts
    • 883 Thanks
    ididntgetwhereiamtoday
    Try looking at a Skoda Fabia.

    Cheaper to insure and run than most mainstream manufacturers and built to last.

    Just make sure it has a decent service history and make sure you get a HPI check and an engineers inspection before you part with your hard earned.

    As a cash customer try the local Skoda dealership as you could get up to 20% off of the screen price.
    Originally posted by Navigator123
    Why?
    Please read the original post as Your post looks like Spam.
    I didn't get where i am today by not reading moneysavingexpert.com
    • adonis10
    • By adonis10 16th Jan 18, 6:18 PM
    • 1,570 Posts
    • 204 Thanks
    adonis10
    I have been reading about the problems with the ecoboost engine and wonder if all of the affected models were dealt with under the product recall? I have searched the reg number of the vehicle I am considering buying and there are no notes to suggest that it needed to be recalled.
    • funguy
    • By funguy 16th Jan 18, 7:35 PM
    • 546 Posts
    • 820 Thanks
    funguy
    I have been reading about the problems with the ecoboost engine and wonder if all of the affected models were dealt with under the product recall? I have searched the reg number of the vehicle I am considering buying and there are no notes to suggest that it needed to be recalled.
    Originally posted by adonis10
    No they definitely haven't all been dealt with. See the following group on Facebook which has just under 1000 members and a growing list :

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/FordEcoboostNightmare/
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 17th Jan 18, 9:09 AM
    • 9,584 Posts
    • 10,658 Thanks
    AnotherJoe
    I would stick with your current car, it!!!8217;s at known quantity and had a lot spent on it recently which should keep it going for a fair few years but realistically you won!!!8217;t get back what you just spent out were yiunto sell it now

    . As someone else said forget depreciation you are well beyond the period that!!!8217;s relevant it!!!8217;s all down to mileage and condition now.
    Last edited by AnotherJoe; 17-01-2018 at 9:12 AM.
    • adonis10
    • By adonis10 17th Jan 18, 9:32 AM
    • 1,570 Posts
    • 204 Thanks
    adonis10
    I would stick with your current car, itís at known quantity and had a lot spent on it recently which should keep it going for a fair few years but realistically you wonít get back what you just spent out were yiunto sell it now

    . As someone else said forget depreciation you are well beyond the period thatís relevant itís all down to mileage and condition now.
    Originally posted by AnotherJoe
    I am seriously considering that, but the 1,500-1750 discount I could get on the car makes me think that it could be an idea to change now and effectively get 1-1.5 years of free depreciation. See how the Fiesta acts over the next year and reassess at a point when I could sell it for practically the same price as I bought it for. In the back of my mind, an 11 year old car with 100k on the clock is probably going to cost more over the next couple of years than a 4 year old with 9k (obviously making the assumption that the Fiesta doesn't blow up like all others apparently do).
    • AnotherJoe
    • By AnotherJoe 17th Jan 18, 9:51 AM
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    AnotherJoe
    That would be true of an !!!8220;average!!!8221; 11 year old car, but yours isn!!!8217;t, you!!!8217;ve given it a lease of life with all that work you did, indeed that!!!8217;s why you did it I expect ?


    Having said that if the Fiesta has only done 9k miles, when you come to sell it it probably won!!!8217;t be a high mileage relative to its age, so it ought to be saleable at a relatively good price.

    The other point to consider is what you!!!8217;ll get for your current car, if uts less than you think/hope perhaps the loss on it will cancel out the saving you make on the Fiesta.

    Tough choice that can be argued either way let us know what you decide it seems to me you!!!8217;ve pretty much made up your mind to go for the Fiesta ?
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