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  • FIRST POST
    • villacarmen
    • By villacarmen 9th Jan 18, 9:29 AM
    • 1Posts
    • 0Thanks
    villacarmen
    Offered promotion without pay rise.
    • #1
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:29 AM
    Offered promotion without pay rise. 9th Jan 18 at 9:29 AM
    Hi New Member here

    Sorry for the ramble.....!

    I'm looking for a bit of advice regarding a situation that has been presented to me at work. I've been with my employer for 17 years now and done a number of roles for them (very large company). Approximately 4 years ago I was at risk of redundancy and i applied for a job that was advertised internally with a salary band between 11 - 38% higher than my then salary. I was becoming stale in the role anyway and the opportunity looked perfect in terms of getting me engaged in my work again. I subsequently got the job but was informed a couple of days later that it would not be coming with the advertised salary but i would be staying on my current salary. Obviously i was upset at this and made my feelings known but the recruiting manager said although he did not agree it was out of his hands and would see what he could do in the coming months. I didn't see much point in arguing as the alternative might have been to miss the opportunity and have to leave the company. A couple of weeks after agreeing to take the new role i received a letter confirming my new role however, this letter stated my job title was different to the one advertised. At the time i didn't have it in me any more to argue as i'd already been through a consultation process (for the potential redundancy) and i'd come to terms with the fact i was taking on this new role.

    12 months passed and a senior manager within the team moved onto pastures new. I was called into the office and asked if i would take responsibility for the departing managers team, thus going from managing nobody to managing a team of 5 project managers. I was enjoying the role at the time and decided it was another good opportunity for me but was told that the new responsibility would not come with any financial compensation.

    A further 3 years down the line and i have been asked if i would be interested in moving into a different role (more of a lateral step) and yes you've guessed it, no pay rise. If anything the new role will mean greater responsibility and increased time away from home (i work from home at the moment). I'm struggling to figure out what to do, I've had a few inflationary pay rises since 2007 probably amounting to a 10% increase in 11 years.

    I like working for the company but also understand that although i've done a lot of different jobs within a large organisation it is essentially working for the same company since i graduated.

    Really not sure what to do.......

    M
Page 1
    • Eric_the_half_a_bee
    • By Eric_the_half_a_bee 9th Jan 18, 9:37 AM
    • 1,143 Posts
    • 5,893 Thanks
    Eric_the_half_a_bee
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:37 AM
    • #2
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:37 AM
    I would start by finding out how much your employer's competitors pay their people for something equivalent to the new role.
    • Gazzafatcityboy
    • By Gazzafatcityboy 9th Jan 18, 9:40 AM
    • 96 Posts
    • 90 Thanks
    Gazzafatcityboy
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:40 AM
    • #3
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:40 AM
    Wow... talk about not awarding loyalty...


    The way I see it is that you need to move or get them to give you a payrise. I think the best way to do that would be to move externally.


    If we really think about this then they have been getting a cheap employee for a number of years without any redress for them. If they were to go to the external market they would definitely pay more for your services.
    Don't be scared, I know it must be hard considering you have been working for the company for such a long time and that you know it very well, being its comfortable. Rejig your Cv put it out there, interview for someone else and if you get a job offer than you can use that as a bargaining chip with your current role.
    • enjoyyourshoes
    • By enjoyyourshoes 9th Jan 18, 9:43 AM
    • 1,061 Posts
    • 1,302 Thanks
    enjoyyourshoes
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:43 AM
    • #4
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:43 AM
    Agree with Eric and also get your CV dudes, start listing competencies and examples of these, register on job sites and stat that Oh so joyful; search for a new position in a company that cares (or dissent but pays you a competitive rate instead of messing you around)

    Loads project managers and portfolio managers required.
    Debt is a symptom, solve the problem.
    • Malthusian
    • By Malthusian 9th Jan 18, 11:04 AM
    • 4,236 Posts
    • 6,665 Thanks
    Malthusian
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:04 AM
    • #5
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:04 AM
    I've had a few inflationary pay rises since 2007 probably amounting to a 10% increase in 11 years.
    Originally posted by villacarmen
    Then you've taken a pay cut of 18% in real terms. Prices are 33% higher than they were in 2007.

    It sounds like they're taking you for a mug and that it's definitely time to look at what other companies are paying for similar roles.
    • NineDeuce
    • By NineDeuce 9th Jan 18, 11:41 AM
    • 827 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    NineDeuce
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:41 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 11:41 AM
    I would just leave the company. Companies only have loyalty to money. However much they may pretend that you are highly valuable, this is only until the point that they dont need you.
    • lulu650
    • By lulu650 9th Jan 18, 12:13 PM
    • 868 Posts
    • 956 Thanks
    lulu650
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:13 PM
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:13 PM
    ........A further 3 years down the line and i have been asked if i would be interested in moving into a different role (more of a lateral step) and yes you've guessed it, no pay rise. If anything the new role will mean greater responsibility and increased time away from home (i work from home at the moment). I'm struggling to figure out what to do
    Originally posted by villacarmen
    What difference would it make if you said thanks but no thanks? Like other posters here I don't know what it is you are struggling with.
    Saving money right, left and centre
    • getmore4less
    • By getmore4less 9th Jan 18, 1:23 PM
    • 32,174 Posts
    • 19,328 Thanks
    getmore4less
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 1:23 PM
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 1:23 PM
    every time you say yes you set the expectation that it will be yes whatever they ask you to do.


    Decline unless there is a rise that includes all the missing ones to bring you up to market rates as a minimum.

    Give them plenty of opportunities to increase the remuneration tell them why you think you are worth more with examples and point out they should even consider back dating(set the expectation higher than you would accept going forward.

    When you find another job that does pay properly watch out for counter offers that don't come with concrete assurances that are implemented during any notice period.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 9th Jan 18, 1:32 PM
    • 5,000 Posts
    • 5,406 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 1:32 PM
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 1:32 PM
    Being offered one promotion without a payrise is one thing - having it happen 3 times is really taking the you-know-what! My initial reaction would be to decline their kind offer of even more responsibility and look for another job. The company may appreciate you but only for basically being mug enough to keep taking on more responsibility!
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