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  • FIRST POST
    • Chickabiddybex
    • By Chickabiddybex 8th Jan 18, 5:19 PM
    • 1,297Posts
    • 1,606Thanks
    Chickabiddybex
    Pocket Money
    • #1
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:19 PM
    Pocket Money 8th Jan 18 at 5:19 PM
    I read that the average pocket money for a 12-16 year old is 6.71 a week. [source]

    It seems to have gone up a bit since I was younger but not a huge amount. What shocked me is people give their kids money for doing chores such as cleaning up after a pet which I had to do for free!

    The other chores and amounts are:
    Cleaning the car: 2.54
    Mowing the lawn: 2.38
    Ironing: 2.19
    Sweeping the garden: 1.86
    Cleaning up after pets: 1.78

    How much pocket money do you give your kids? And how much did you get when you were a kid?

    Do you pay your kids for chores and if so how much?

    How do you pay your kids? (Cash or digitally)

    I was shocked to discover that kids these days often have pocket money cards and apps!
    You can read more about those on the original link above or here: https://www.moneysavingexpert.com/banking/cards-for-under-18s
    Last edited by Chickabiddybex; 10-01-2018 at 3:13 PM.
    Hi. I'm a Board Guide on the Gaming, Consumer Rights, Ebay and Praise/Vent boards. I volunteer to help get your forum questions answered and keep the forum running smoothly. Board guides are not moderators and don't read every post. If you spot an abusive or illegal post then please report it to forumteam@moneysavingexpert.com (it's not part of my role to deal with abuse). Any views are mine and not the official line of MoneySavingExpert.com
Page 3
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 10th Jan 18, 3:03 PM
    • 2,752 Posts
    • 6,693 Thanks
    ska lover
    Who is running ragged?, us parent in our house are not ... We have our busy times of course, but not to the point we are "ragged". If that is the case i would be looking to rectify that very quickly by managing time better or prioritising differently.


    None of that happens in my experience. Micro managing children with lists/chores is suffocating and pointless. Let kids be kids for the short period they are able. None of it is rocket science and they will (and have been) fine when the time comes when they move out. Feeling like a slave is just a state of mind for the parent who resents the fact children have spare time .... So long as the children are respectful and appreciative then I personally dont have an issue with it.
    Originally posted by svain





    Who is running ragged? People with busier schedules than you maybe? say someone working 12 hour shift, coming home to do all the chores whilst their kids chill on sofa with their I pads


    I disagree, but that's your opinion and your right to have it, of course and I respect that

    In your experience these things haven't happened but that doesn't mean there isn't a world outside your front door. As far as you know, these things aren't a problem, but would you really be the first to know, if your adult offspring's marriage was falling apart because they refused to do any housework? I wouldn't expect anyone to approach their mother in law to complain that her son/daughter was lazy and to thank her for instilling this superiority complex into their head


    Teaching kids they do not need to participate in household necessities, and these ideas could carry into their adulthood and be a real problem in adult relationships. I have seen it with my own eyes, the frustration and resentments that build up when a couple are both working and one is just expected to take the place of Mother. and the complete astonishment of the other partner


    I don't think any parent would resent their young kids having spare time - we are not talking Cinderella, having kids scrubbing floors until 11pm, but if free time is all they ever have, whilst parents work full time and do every chore whilst kids sit gawping, is teaching kids that they are superior - pretty much unleashing clueless teenagers on to the world


    Also it eats in to family time, instead of spending time together as a family, parents are running round whilst kids are chilling - no team work or family time. Or everyone gets stuck in and finishes together as a team, then all sit down to play a game or watch a family movie together
    Last edited by ska lover; 10-01-2018 at 3:16 PM.
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • svain
    • By svain 10th Jan 18, 3:17 PM
    • 353 Posts
    • 624 Thanks
    svain
    I disagree, but that's your opinion and your right to have it, of course and I respect that

    In your experience these things haven't happened but that doesn't mean there isn't a world outside your front door. As far as you know, these things aren't a problem, but would you really be the first to know, if your adult offspring's marriage was falling apart because they refused to do any housework? I wouldn't approach my mother in law to complain that her son was a lazy man and to thank her for instilling this superiority complex into his head


    Teaching kids they do not need to participate in household necessities, and these ideas could carry into their adulthood and be a real problem in adult relationships. I have seen it with my own eyes, the frustration and resentments that build up when a couple are both working and one is just expected to take the place of Mother. and the complete astonishment of the other partner


    I don't think any parent would resent their young kids having spare time - we are not talking Cinderella, having kids scrubbing floors until 11pm, but if free time is all they ever have, whilst parents work full time and do every chore whilst kids sit gawping, is teaching kids that they are superior - pretty much unleashing clueless teenagers on to the world
    Originally posted by ska lover

    I can only go by my own upbringing and other family members and my adult children .... and none had chores forced onto them All have grown up into reasonable members of society. If one of my kids was considered lazy by the partners (and they were genuinely were) then "respect" is the bigger problem imo and its not because they didnt do chores as a child ..... and they will learn (easy or hard way) what life is about
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 10th Jan 18, 3:35 PM
    • 2,752 Posts
    • 6,693 Thanks
    ska lover
    I can only go by my own upbringing and other family members and my adult children .... and none had chores forced onto them All have grown up into reasonable members of society. If one of my kids was considered lazy by the partners (and they were genuinely were) then "respect" is the bigger problem imo and its not because they didnt do chores as a child ..... and they will learn (easy or hard way) what life is about
    Originally posted by svain


    ahh very true - we all learn as life goes on, whether it is chores, or a million and one topics - its a good job we are not all the same though as they say life would be boring
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 10th Jan 18, 3:43 PM
    • 2,970 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    Comms69
    If someone has a strong view on something then they can labour the point. However, it seems you are more bothered about me than the actual discussion.

    Teaching them about kindness doesn't mean working for free? "Ok mum. I will do the washing up for you... but only if you give me money for it. Then you can do it tomorrow for free, mum"....

    I never realised that doing the odd chore around the house was 'working'.....
    Originally posted by NineDeuce
    Indeed and you seem to have a strong view on how I raise my kids. I haven't mentioned yours... In any case, labouring the point rarely works.


    Usually it's more like here is your list of chores. Well done, here's some pocket money for your wallet, holiday fund, whatever.


    Or, that's ok, don't do your chores. But don't expect to save up for that game, toy, whatever with that attitude.
    • ska lover
    • By ska lover 10th Jan 18, 8:51 PM
    • 2,752 Posts
    • 6,693 Thanks
    ska lover
    Why don't you two just get a room?
    The opposite of what you know...is also true
    • kerri gt
    • By kerri gt 10th Jan 18, 9:05 PM
    • 7,102 Posts
    • 49,541 Thanks
    kerri gt
    Why don't you two just get a room?
    Originally posted by ska lover
    They'd never agree on who cleaned it or whether or not the person who did should get paid
    Feb 2015 NSD Challenge 8/12
    JAN NSD 11/16


    • NineDeuce
    • By NineDeuce 11th Jan 18, 10:12 AM
    • 827 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    NineDeuce
    Why don't you two just get a room?
    Originally posted by ska lover
    She couldnt afford it. She spends her money paying children to do the dusting....
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 11th Jan 18, 10:41 AM
    • 2,970 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    Comms69
    She couldnt afford it. She spends her money paying children to do the dusting....
    Originally posted by NineDeuce

    He... pays 10p per chore....
    • xXMessedUpXx
    • By xXMessedUpXx 12th Jan 18, 1:07 AM
    • 17,135 Posts
    • 45,087 Thanks
    xXMessedUpXx
    I got a fiver a week.

    'Admittedly didn't do chores, but my mum is a neat freak and wouldn't let us i babysat my siblings a lot but only once asked for money and got told that everything i wanted, room over my head, food, cleaning was done for me. Never asked again....
    "Life Is Like A Beautiful Melody Only The Lyrics Are Messed Up"
    To see the rainbow you need both the sun and the rain to make its colours appear
    "I just need to be alone right now, i just wanna take a little breather"
    • DaddyR
    • By DaddyR 17th Jan 18, 10:24 AM
    • 4 Posts
    • 13 Thanks
    DaddyR
    In the past year or so my 14-year old knows that, all things being equal, she will get 30 pocket money per month. This gets reduced if she doesn't do the washing up, put out washed clothes to dry, etc. (all things a 14-year old can do). She gets extra "credit" for looking after her little sister (whose 7). She gets "penalised" for bad behavior. She earns additional money, outside of this agreement, for mowing the lawn.

    At the end of the month we have a conversation about what she deserves, based on what she has done, and I present my view of her value (based on what she hasn't done) and we negotiate.

    It's done in a lot more light hearted way than that explanation comes across! Most months she gets somewhere between 20 and 27. But I want her to get use to understanding the value she provides by helping the entire family and for her to get used to earning additional money based on the valuable help she provides (everything she earns is hers to spend as she wants, and I am happy to pay for everything she needs).
    • onlyroz
    • By onlyroz 17th Jan 18, 10:48 AM
    • 14,045 Posts
    • 26,877 Thanks
    onlyroz
    My 9-year-old gets 3 a week plus 50p for each "house point" she is awarded at school.


    My 12-year-old gets 5 a week plus 1 for each "achievement point" he is awarded at school.


    They are also expected to keep their room tidy.
    • peachyprice
    • By peachyprice 17th Jan 18, 10:54 AM
    • 19,437 Posts
    • 45,093 Thanks
    peachyprice
    He... pays 10p per chore....
    Originally posted by Comms69
    10p per chore? So you're telling your children that is all they are worth. Nice.
    Accept your past without regret, handle your present with confidence and face your future without fear
    • engineer amy
    • By engineer amy 17th Jan 18, 4:05 PM
    • 626 Posts
    • 1,127 Thanks
    engineer amy
    From about age 12 until 18, my granddad gave me 5 per week pocket money, on the basis that I helped my mum with the chores. Every Friday when he visited, he would ask mum for a list of things that I had helped with that week. On one or two occasions, he deemed that my assistance was insufficient and I didn't get any pocket money that week. I learnt very quickly that offering to do things and using a bit of initiative gave me far more brownie points than waiting to be asked to do something.
    Then from about age 15, I was deemed responsible enough to babysit once a fortnight for a family friend, for which I received 10 per time. It coincided with getting my first PAYG mobile phone, so this paid for my top ups each month.
    Getting a fixed amount of pocket money each week taught me that once its gone, its gone, so all of a sudden that eyeshadow wasn't such a must have item, if I wanted to buy the new Spice Girls album!
    Mortgage = 113,495 (May 2009) 72330 Feb 18
    Halifax CC 0% = 0!!! Car Loan = 0!!!!!
    PAYDBX16 #106 = 12377/12377 (100%)
    • Madbags
    • By Madbags 17th Jan 18, 4:46 PM
    • 206 Posts
    • 125 Thanks
    Madbags
    My grandparents used to give me and my brothers pocket money, my parents however did not, 50p a week from one and 50p a week from another. Our parents just bought us the things we needed and occasionally the things wanted when we were growing up.

    We weren't exactly a rich family so pocket money from my parents was out of the question really. That 50p or whatever would be a few pints of milk to them and in all honestly I'm grateful we always got fed and clothed etc.

    As for money to do chores, same as the above, that was out of the question too. To be honest me and my brothers, even from a young age, could see how our parents worked damn hard to put food on the table, we were all intelligent enough.

    All we wanted when we got a little bit older and still living at home was a quiet life. Our mother used to come home from work and nag and moan about the chores (by this point parents were divorced and Dad living elsewhere on his own) but eventually we decided we would just do all the chores every day (even when we got old enough to have our own jobs) so she could come home and not have to moan about the same thing every day. We never expected anything in return except peace and quiet.
    Last edited by Madbags; 17-01-2018 at 4:51 PM.
    • letspretendforaminute
    • By letspretendforaminute 17th Jan 18, 5:56 PM
    • 55 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    letspretendforaminute
    I pay my children the lower JSA rate 59.10p a week each and will up this to the higher rate if/when they attend university. They understand that this covers all their spends outside of education. Clothes, treats, and activities. Last year my 6 year old son treated me to a ride in an R44 helicopter!!!
    • beautiful_ravens
    • By beautiful_ravens 17th Jan 18, 9:55 PM
    • 750 Posts
    • 2,866 Thanks
    beautiful_ravens
    If I have money, I offer money to the kids to do jobs.
    If I have no spare money, I ask them to do a few things around the house.
    Eiither way, they sometimes get money, and sometimes do chores.
    ''A moment's thinking is an hour in words.'' -Thomas Hood
    • Comms69
    • By Comms69 18th Jan 18, 5:23 PM
    • 2,970 Posts
    • 2,939 Thanks
    Comms69
    10p per chore? So you're telling your children that is all they are worth. Nice.
    Originally posted by peachyprice


    Not what they're worth, no.


    A chore may be to feed the pets, to put clothes in the washing machine, whatever. Typically it works out at around 50p per day, which is plenty.


    Sorry you feel you're only worth what you're paid to do though
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