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    • user1168934
    • By user1168934 8th Jan 18, 4:31 PM
    • 276Posts
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    user1168934
    Electric heating or new central heating installation?
    • #1
    • 8th Jan 18, 4:31 PM
    Electric heating or new central heating installation? 8th Jan 18 at 4:31 PM
    I live in a 2 bed flat which had these old style gas heaters which have stopped working one after the other. We bought a couple of oil-filled radiators in the interim. This has substantially increased our electricity consumption to around 160 per month (winter - I guess it will be a bit lower in summer).
    We got a few quotes to get central heating installed with a modern combi boiler and it is coming down to around 4500. In about 14 months time we might try to sell this place and buy a house if we can depending on how much we can borrow etc. But if we cannot afford to move or could not find a decent house then we might have to stay here for longer.

    I am a bit puzzled what to do. Should I get the central heating installed at this cost or just continue to use electric heating until we sell?

    At the moment our estimated electricity bill is around 1800 for the year. If I switch suppliers it might come down to around 1400 for the same usage (source: comparison site).
    Last edited by user1168934; 08-01-2018 at 4:35 PM.

Page 1
    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 8th Jan 18, 5:12 PM
    • 3,587 Posts
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    matelodave
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:12 PM
    • #2
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:12 PM
    If you own the flat then you'll probably find that adding a proper gas fired central heating system will add significant value to your property and make it easier to sell when the time comes.

    It will also make you more comfortable and reduce your energy bills. IMO it's really a no brainer to get it installed if you can afford it as you'l easily get your money back when you sell
    Love makes the world go round - beer make it go round even faster
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    • user1168934
    • By user1168934 8th Jan 18, 5:40 PM
    • 276 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    user1168934
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:40 PM
    • #3
    • 8th Jan 18, 5:40 PM
    ....................will add significant value to your property and .............
    ..................
    you'l easily get your money back when you sell
    Originally posted by matelodave
    Thanks for the reply.
    I suppose these are the points I am struggling with. Is it really going to add at least 4500 to the property value as opposed to one with electric heating (say wall mounted electric heaters which would be cheap to buy and fit)?

    In my observation once its there people will just take it as granted and try to haggle the price anyway on the whole.
    I have not sold property before hence asking for advice. It would be interesting to see what people think.

    • matelodave
    • By matelodave 8th Jan 18, 7:53 PM
    • 3,587 Posts
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    matelodave
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 18, 7:53 PM
    • #4
    • 8th Jan 18, 7:53 PM
    My mum's bungalow with electric panel heaters was on the market for over six months until we fitted gas central heating. It cost us 4.3k.

    We put the place back on the market and sold it within 3 weeks at 5k over our asking price.

    There's no guarantee that you'll get your money back but it's more than likely and you will have less to haggle about when you do come to sell.
    Last edited by matelodave; 08-01-2018 at 7:57 PM.
    Love makes the world go round - beer make it go round even faster
    Look after our planet - it's the only one with beer
    • ic
    • By ic 8th Jan 18, 9:48 PM
    • 2,590 Posts
    • 1,329 Thanks
    ic
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 9:48 PM
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 9:48 PM
    In about 14 months time we might try to sell this place and buy a house if we can depending on how much we can borrow etc. But if we cannot afford to move or could not find a decent house then we might have to stay here for longer.
    Originally posted by user1168934
    You'll start making savings immediately, as soon as its installed. So you'll save within this first year, and then if you don't move for whatever reason, you'll continue to save until you do. When you do move, it'll help the price of the flat.

    Seems a no brainer to me.

    Anyway, how have the existing gas heaters failed? What is wrong with them? Is the third option not to simply repair them? Fourth option replace them with more gas heaters?
    * my posts are made in good faith and only represent my own opinion, experience or understanding of a situation.
    • Xbigman
    • By Xbigman 9th Jan 18, 12:51 AM
    • 3,111 Posts
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    Xbigman
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:51 AM
    • #6
    • 9th Jan 18, 12:51 AM
    You say your usage has increased to 160 per month. It might be that the number of units of electric has gone up only a little but you are using expensive day units instead of E7 nightrate. You should compare meter readings and work out just how much extra energy (rather than money) you are using. That should be a factor in any decision to spend 4500.


    Darren
    Xbigman's guide to a happy life.

    Eat properly
    Sleep properly
    Save some money
    • user1168934
    • By user1168934 9th Jan 18, 9:22 AM
    • 276 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    user1168934
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:22 AM
    • #7
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:22 AM
    You'll start making savings immediately, as soon as its installed. So you'll save within this first year, and then if you don't move for whatever reason, you'll continue to save until you do. When you do move, it'll help the price of the flat.

    Seems a no brainer to me.

    Anyway, how have the existing gas heaters failed? What is wrong with them? Is the third option not to simply repair them? Fourth option replace them with more gas heaters?
    Originally posted by ic
    I did explore the option of getting the existing ones fixed or replaced. They are really old heaters and were discontinued long long time ago. Their thermostat or ignition has developed fault so sometimes they turn on and sometimes they dont. Spare parts are not available anymore and like for like replacements are not available. There are other slightly different models I can go for replacement but they are not cheaper either. I inquired from 2-3 places and replacements will cost around 2500 (with labour etc) and even after that my water heating will still be electric immersion. If I have to spend such a substantial amount I might as well spend a bit more and get the full gas central heating. This is why I have rejected the idea of replacing them.

    • user1168934
    • By user1168934 9th Jan 18, 9:49 AM
    • 276 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    user1168934
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:49 AM
    • #8
    • 9th Jan 18, 9:49 AM
    You say your usage has increased to 160 per month. It might be that the number of units of electric has gone up only a little but you are using expensive day units instead of E7 nightrate. You should compare meter readings and work out just how much extra energy (rather than money) you are using. That should be a factor in any decision to spend 4500.


    Darren
    Originally posted by Xbigman
    Well I don't have E7 heating so it is just one single tariff. The problem is that I dont know how much electricity we were using before we switched to electric heating. I have had estimated bills for over a year and had not submitted actual reading for a long time. I have had one actual bill so far (nov-dec) which is what the 160 per month figure is based on.
    About a month ago I started noting down electricity reading everyday at the same time. On average we are using around 34 units everyday. This includes heating, 2 fridge/freezers, kettle (which we use a lot) and very careful use of immersion water heating plus the usual lights tv etc.
    Any ideas how I can determine the use excluding heating ??? (apart from not using heating for a day - I have kids I cannot just turn off heating in this kind of weather).

    • lstar337
    • By lstar337 9th Jan 18, 10:09 AM
    • 3,367 Posts
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    lstar337
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:09 AM
    • #9
    • 9th Jan 18, 10:09 AM
    Is it really going to add at least 4500 to the property value as opposed to one with electric heating (say wall mounted electric heaters which would be cheap to buy and fit)?
    Originally posted by user1168934
    I (and many others) wouldn't touch a property with wall mounted electric heaters.

    People will try to knock you down from your asking price to cover the cost of an GCH install, so factor that in rather than thinking about the 's it might add to the value.
    • NineDeuce
    • By NineDeuce 9th Jan 18, 12:02 PM
    • 827 Posts
    • 766 Thanks
    NineDeuce
    Central heating every time. It may be a bigger outlay but electricity is rising at a much higher rate and will do for the foreseeable future.
    • Xbigman
    • By Xbigman 9th Jan 18, 7:08 PM
    • 3,111 Posts
    • 1,348 Thanks
    Xbigman
    Well I don't have E7 heating so it is just one single tariff. The problem is that I dont know how much electricity we were using before we switched to electric heating. I have had estimated bills for over a year and had not submitted actual reading for a long time. I have had one actual bill so far (nov-dec) which is what the 160 per month figure is based on.
    About a month ago I started noting down electricity reading everyday at the same time. On average we are using around 34 units everyday. This includes heating, 2 fridge/freezers, kettle (which we use a lot) and very careful use of immersion water heating plus the usual lights tv etc.
    Any ideas how I can determine the use excluding heating ??? (apart from not using heating for a day - I have kids I cannot just turn off heating in this kind of weather).
    Originally posted by user1168934
    Apologies, I misread your first post.

    If your oil filled radiators are plug in types your can buy an energy monitor for the Socket. Like this...

    www.amazon.co.uk/Lowenergie-Monitor-Electricity-Electric-Monitoring/dp/B00G955V0E/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1515524765&sr=8-7&keywords=plug+in+energy+monitor
    Xbigman's guide to a happy life.

    Eat properly
    Sleep properly
    Save some money
    • badmemory
    • By badmemory 10th Jan 18, 3:27 AM
    • 1,709 Posts
    • 2,305 Thanks
    badmemory
    Having a "proper" central heating system installed increases the market for your flat, which in turn increases the possible price. It also increases your own personal comfort for the time you remain. A win win situation to me, but then I am somewhat older & never ever want to wake up again to a glass of water frozen by my bedside etc ever again.
    • House Martin
    • By House Martin 10th Jan 18, 8:38 AM
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    • 1,165 Thanks
    House Martin
    4500 for the fitting of a CH system seems a very expensive quote just for a small flat..
    Why not source a reliable make of boiler at the best UK prices available yourself ?.Buy your own rads, they are not expensive
    That would be less than 800 for a Valiant, or Worcester Bosch and finding someone to fit it for less than 2k. They can fit it in a couple of days if they know what they are doing.
    • macman
    • By macman 10th Jan 18, 10:30 AM
    • 41,920 Posts
    • 17,396 Thanks
    macman
    As above, 4.5K for an install with an existing gas supply is way OTT.
    If that quote was from BG, then you can get it for about 40% less via an independent GSR RGI.
    There's no guarantee that you'll get your investment back in 14 months though, so I'd leave well alone.
    No free lunch, and no free laptop
    • user1168934
    • By user1168934 10th Jan 18, 4:56 PM
    • 276 Posts
    • 118 Thanks
    user1168934
    Thanks guys, as for the 4500 I also thought it is way too much for a small flat. I got 3 quotes from independent plumbers and this was the "lowest" quote I got. I also got one from BG which was just over 7000.

    FYI - This 4500 includes around 500 for the solicitor fees etc which I will have to pay to get permission from the freeholder in order to carry out the work.

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