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  • FIRST POST
    • donenvy
    • By donenvy 7th Jan 18, 9:06 PM
    • 6Posts
    • 0Thanks
    donenvy
    Repair timber floor cost
    • #1
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:06 PM
    Repair timber floor cost 7th Jan 18 at 9:06 PM
    I recently had a damp and timber specialist report done. Luckily there was no rising damp issue but the issues it did come up with was the property needed proper ventilation and timber floor 1 x 1 meter (approx) has dropped in one corner of one of the room.

    To remedy the problem I would need to have:

    1. Repair timber floor 1 x 1 meter in one room
    2. Installing 3 sub floor vents in total across front room and rear room to increase cross flow ventilation
    3. Timber treatment to both room timber suspended floors

    The price I have been quoted is 2,300. I have no idea if this is a good quote or a poor one.

    Can't find an exact example but every where I am reading seems to indicate putting in sub floor vents, repairing small section of timber floor and treatment should be relatively cheap job to do. But I've been quoted 2.3K.

    Not sure if a normal builder can do this type of work or if it has to be a damp and proof specialist. Has anybody had this type of work done recently that can give me an idea of what you were quoted or paid to do the job? I'm struggling to find good examples online of what people paid to do the job.
    Last edited by donenvy; 07-01-2018 at 9:13 PM. Reason: included the vat on price
Page 1
    • Cakeguts
    • By Cakeguts 7th Jan 18, 9:12 PM
    • 4,410 Posts
    • 6,333 Thanks
    Cakeguts
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:12 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:12 PM
    Who gave you the quote? It is a building job.
    • donenvy
    • By donenvy 7th Jan 18, 9:20 PM
    • 6 Posts
    • 0 Thanks
    donenvy
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:20 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:20 PM
    Same company that did the damp and timber report. I am just trying to ascertain if the quote I've been given is an expensive one. I tried searching online to see what other people have paid and most examples I've come across is the where there was dry rot damp, replacing the entire sub floor and burning off dry rot costing what I've been quoted.

    Individual examples I've come across seem to indicate this type of job should be much lower than that, but haven't come across the exact same scenario. So just trying to find out if someone else has done it before and what they paid for it as I have no idea if that is a good or bad quote.
    • Slithery
    • By Slithery 7th Jan 18, 9:33 PM
    • 724 Posts
    • 1,127 Thanks
    Slithery
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:33 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:33 PM
    Was this an independent damp report that you paid for, or was it a free one from a company that makes its money selling damp 'solutions'?
    • Owain Moneysaver
    • By Owain Moneysaver 8th Jan 18, 12:00 AM
    • 8,180 Posts
    • 9,059 Thanks
    Owain Moneysaver
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 12:00 AM
    • #5
    • 8th Jan 18, 12:00 AM
    I recently had a damp and timber specialist report done. Luckily there was no rising damp issue but the issues it did come up with was the property needed proper ventilation and timber floor 1 x 1 meter (approx) has dropped in one corner of one of the room.

    To remedy the problem I would need to have:

    1. Repair timber floor 1 x 1 meter in one room
    2. Installing 3 sub floor vents in total across front room and rear room to increase cross flow ventilation
    3. Timber treatment to both room timber suspended floors
    Originally posted by donenvy
    1. If the floor has dropped you need to prop it up again. May just need some slate wedged in under a joist where some mortar has dropped out.

    2. That probably means knocking out a couple of bricks in the dwarf walls under the floor.

    3. Why? If there's no rising damp and proper ventilation you won't get rot. If the timber is reasonably modern it will have been treated before the house was built.

    Couple of hours' work for a bloke wiv an 'ammer. (Or these days, a lass wiv an 'ammer.)
    A kind word lasts a minute, a skelped erse is sair for a day.
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