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  • FIRST POST
    • Cotta
    • By Cotta 7th Jan 18, 6:34 PM
    • 2,725Posts
    • 1,114Thanks
    Cotta
    Personal Leave for a Funeral
    • #1
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:34 PM
    Personal Leave for a Funeral 7th Jan 18 at 6:34 PM
    Hi All,

    I was wondering if taking a day off work on paid personal leave to attend a funeral of either a close relative is allowed in workplaces now or are employees expected to take it from their holiday allowance?
Page 1
    • Nick_C
    • By Nick_C 7th Jan 18, 6:36 PM
    • 3,850 Posts
    • 5,291 Thanks
    Nick_C
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:36 PM
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:36 PM
    It will depend entirely on your employer, and how close the relative was.
    • ohreally
    • By ohreally 7th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    • 6,657 Posts
    • 5,185 Thanks
    ohreally
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    Is a days compassionate leave an option?
    • ssparks2003
    • By ssparks2003 7th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    • 377 Posts
    • 513 Thanks
    ssparks2003
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:37 PM
    It's annual leave unless your company has a specific policy offering this
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 7th Jan 18, 7:35 PM
    • 5,027 Posts
    • 5,456 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:35 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:35 PM
    The situation does vary between companies, but generally compassionate leave would only be granted for a close family member. Some companies may have a more relaxed attitude to making up time if somebody is out for a couple of hours to attend a funeral. Any more time than that would, more often than not, have to be taken from annual leave.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 7th Jan 18, 7:42 PM
    • 4,683 Posts
    • 7,914 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:42 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 7:42 PM
    Hi All,

    I was wondering if taking a day off work on paid personal leave to attend a funeral of either a close relative is allowed in workplaces now or are employees expected to take it from their holiday allowance?
    Originally posted by Cotta
    in law, there is no such thing as paid personal leave. There's actually no such thing as unpaid personal leave either! So there is no right to time off for a funeral. If the employer allows it, then that use their choice.
    • TBagpuss
    • By TBagpuss 8th Jan 18, 12:26 PM
    • 6,570 Posts
    • 8,539 Thanks
    TBagpuss
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 18, 12:26 PM
    • #7
    • 8th Jan 18, 12:26 PM
    As others say, there's no general rule or automatic entitlment.

    Where I work, someone would typically be given a couple of days of (paid) compassionate leave in the event of the death of a close family member - normally this is taken around the time of the death, when someone is dealing with the first shock of grief, and perhaps with making arrangements.

    Time off for a funeral would usually be taken as part of normal holiday entitlement.

    Compassionate leave is normally discretionary so how long is given and when will depend on the company, and may also depend on the specific circumstances - a company might chose to give more leave if the death were unexpected or in particularly distressing circumstances, or if an inquest or police investigation were needed, than in other cases, for instance.
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 8th Jan 18, 1:31 PM
    • 5,027 Posts
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    TELLIT01
    • #8
    • 8th Jan 18, 1:31 PM
    • #8
    • 8th Jan 18, 1:31 PM
    As others say, there's no general rule or automatic entitlment.
    Originally posted by TBagpuss
    That is so true. The father of a work colleague of mine died whilst he and his father were out together. At that time we were working for a financial services company. He was told to take as much time as he needed and was off for nearly a month.
    Move on several years and I was working for DWP. I had given my brother a lift down to the hospital for blood tests, where he collapsed and died within a few hours. I was told that I could have 1 week compassionate leave then had the option of returning to work, taking leave or getting signed off sick.
    Different organisations, very different attitudes.
    • Takeaway_Addict
    • By Takeaway_Addict 8th Jan 18, 1:51 PM
    • 5,818 Posts
    • 6,712 Thanks
    Takeaway_Addict
    • #9
    • 8th Jan 18, 1:51 PM
    • #9
    • 8th Jan 18, 1:51 PM
    That is so true. The father of a work colleague of mine died whilst he and his father were out together. At that time we were working for a financial services company. He was told to take as much time as he needed and was off for nearly a month.
    Move on several years and I was working for DWP. I had given my brother a lift down to the hospital for blood tests, where he collapsed and died within a few hours. I was told that I could have 1 week compassionate leave then had the option of returning to work, taking leave or getting signed off sick.
    Different organisations, very different attitudes.
    Originally posted by TELLIT01
    What would you expect the DWP to do different then because their response seems reasonable to me.
    Don't trust a forum for advice. Get proper paid advice. Any advice given should always be checked
    • DCFC79
    • By DCFC79 8th Jan 18, 1:54 PM
    • 31,938 Posts
    • 20,120 Thanks
    DCFC79
    Just speak to your employer (or check your employee handbook), they will tell you what the score is.
    • Faith177
    • By Faith177 8th Jan 18, 3:29 PM
    • 2,527 Posts
    • 4,038 Thanks
    Faith177
    When my mum died I was given just over a month off but that was because it was just me and my brother to sort out everything and she lived in Inverness I live in essex and we only had 2 weeks to clear her house out as she rented and we couldn't afford the rent to hold it any longer. Also I dislocated my knee whilst clearing her house so was in a splint for 10 days.

    When my first Grandad passed last Nov I was allowed 2 days compassionate and had to take the rest as holiday that was with the same company and within 18 months of my mum

    I moved companies and my second Grandad recently passed they allowed me to leave early when we got the call to get to the hospital and then the following monday off and a day for the funeral all paid. I get the impression they would have allowed more but I didn't need it

    On all these occasions my brother was only allowed 1 day for the funeral nothing more
    First Date 08/11/2008, Moved In Together 01/06/2009, Engaged 01/01/10, Wedding Date 27/04/2013

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    • scd3scd4
    • By scd3scd4 8th Jan 18, 3:41 PM
    • 893 Posts
    • 755 Thanks
    scd3scd4
    There is no right and of course it depends on who it is. In most cases taking a days holiday would solve the problem.


    I had a friends dad die. The company told him he could only have 3 days...............he went sick with depression and had 6 weeks!!
    • TELLIT01
    • By TELLIT01 8th Jan 18, 5:42 PM
    • 5,027 Posts
    • 5,456 Thanks
    TELLIT01
    What would you expect the DWP to do different then because their response seems reasonable to me.
    Originally posted by Takeaway_Addict
    I wasn't saying one was right or wrong, just highlighting the difference in attitude. One job was private sector and the other public sector. Private sector managers generally have more freedom to do what they think is right, wherease public sector are more controlled by rules and regulations.
    • Intoodeep
    • By Intoodeep 8th Jan 18, 5:44 PM
    • 903 Posts
    • 1,542 Thanks
    Intoodeep
    Our Company pay one days compassionate
    for the Deaths of Grandparents, Parents, Siblings, Children, or if asked to be a bearer at said Funeral even if not a relative
    • nimbo
    • By nimbo 9th Jan 18, 7:32 AM
    • 3,267 Posts
    • 8,934 Thanks
    nimbo
    Where I was based the nhs policy was 2 days paid for either a parents death or the death of your own child as compassionate leave. Blhowever at managers discretion more could be taken. ( I!!!8217;m thinking the death of a child for example).

    There was a massive hoo har when a colleagues grandmother died and her direct manager allowed her the two days as she!!!8217;d been raised by her grandparents - lived with them until middles 20!!!8217;s when she!!!8217;d bought a house and had maybe moved out 6 months before the death. More senior managers were behaving very briskly.

    Where I am now I technically get nothing. But my manager is very approachable and seens as I am owed over 200 hours flexi time I!!!8217;m sure would accommodate a request.

    Stashbuster - 2014 98/100 - 2015 175/200 - 2016 501 / 500 2017 - 200 / 500 2018 3 / 500
    • Lincoln Imp
    • By Lincoln Imp 9th Jan 18, 11:58 AM
    • 2,387 Posts
    • 4,146 Thanks
    Lincoln Imp
    The last company i worked at had a policy where you was allowed 1 day for Auntie/Uncle ,3 days for Brother in law ,Sister in law etc and 5 days for Parent ,Child,Wife or Husband plus 1 extra day if needed for travel or arrangements
    Pretty decent to be honest
    Have a nice day
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