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  • FIRST POST
    • lr1277
    • By lr1277 6th Jan 18, 11:38 PM
    • 551Posts
    • 316Thanks
    lr1277
    Car Insurance for a hospitalised person
    • #1
    • 6th Jan 18, 11:38 PM
    Car Insurance for a hospitalised person 6th Jan 18 at 11:38 PM
    Hi

    My dad is somewhat ill and is currently hospitalised. I don't expect him to drive again.

    So I have a few questions:

    1) Should we tell his car insurance company about his current condition?
    2) I assume his insurance lapses should he die? So named drivers would not be insured should they drive his car after his death?
    3) My brother and his family would like to visit him from the US. My brother's wife is American, got her licence there and does most of the driving especially with the kids. Would a British insurance company accept her as a named driver on his policy (whilst he is still alive) or is it not that easy?

    Many thanks in advance if you can shed any light on these issues.

    Lr
Page 1
    • forgotmyname
    • By forgotmyname 7th Jan 18, 2:17 AM
    • 27,203 Posts
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    forgotmyname
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 2:17 AM
    • #2
    • 7th Jan 18, 2:17 AM
    Some will some wont. You need to speak to the insurer.
    Punctuation, Spelling and Grammar will be used sparingly. Due to rising costs of inflation.

    My contribution to MSE. Other contributions will only be used if they cost me nothing.

    Due to me being a tight git.
    • jk0
    • By jk0 7th Jan 18, 11:02 AM
    • 2,315 Posts
    • 24,827 Thanks
    jk0
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:02 AM
    • #3
    • 7th Jan 18, 11:02 AM
    You might get dad's insurer to temporarily cover sister in law for a small fee. Alternatively, could SIL approach her own insurer in America to enquire if they would cover her for a few weeks in the UK?
    • loskie
    • By loskie 7th Jan 18, 12:11 PM
    • 1,291 Posts
    • 769 Thanks
    loskie
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:11 PM
    • #4
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:11 PM
    or take a look at someone like Dayinsure
    • fred246
    • By fred246 7th Jan 18, 12:32 PM
    • 975 Posts
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    fred246
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:32 PM
    • #5
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:32 PM
    Beware you might be told to go away if you phone up about your dad's policy. Data protection.
    • jk0
    • By jk0 7th Jan 18, 12:49 PM
    • 2,315 Posts
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    jk0
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:49 PM
    • #6
    • 7th Jan 18, 12:49 PM
    Actually, this raises an interesting question regarding home-swappers for holidays. Is it necessary for each person to take temporary insurance on the foreign vehicle, or is it covered by their home country's insurance? Or do the home swap companies supply insurance for you to drive your host's car?
    • Tarambor
    • By Tarambor 7th Jan 18, 1:13 PM
    • 3,039 Posts
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    Tarambor
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:13 PM
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:13 PM
    1) No, there's no reason to.
    2) Yes it will so no named drivers will be insured.
    3) Only your father can make the changes to the insurance. Is he well enough to deal with it?
    • lr1277
    • By lr1277 7th Jan 18, 3:50 PM
    • 551 Posts
    • 316 Thanks
    lr1277
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 3:50 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 3:50 PM
    1) No, there's no reason to.
    2) Yes it will so no named drivers will be insured.
    3) Only your father can make the changes to the insurance. Is he well enough to deal with it?
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    No my father isn't well enough to deal with this. My mum and I are looking to get a power of attorney. We are seeing the solicitor this week. Will ask the solicitor if PoA can deal with who drives dad's car.
    • missile
    • By missile 7th Jan 18, 4:03 PM
    • 9,468 Posts
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    missile
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 4:03 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 4:03 PM
    How long does insurance have until expiry?
    You might want to consider taking out a new policy?
    "A nation's greatness is measured by how it treats its weakest members." ~ Mahatma Gandhi
    Ride hard or stay home
    • AndyMc.....
    • By AndyMc..... 7th Jan 18, 4:04 PM
    • 1,564 Posts
    • 1,007 Thanks
    AndyMc.....
    1) No, there's no reason to.If the illness is one the dvla need to know about then the insurance company may need to know.
    2) Yes it will so no named drivers will be insured. Have you seen the policy details. It may not end straight away.
    3) Only your father can make the changes to the insurance. Is he well enough to deal with it?
    Originally posted by Tarambor
    OP don’t believe everything you read online.
    • trailingspouse
    • By trailingspouse 7th Jan 18, 4:31 PM
    • 2,680 Posts
    • 4,368 Thanks
    trailingspouse
    Re your relative driving on a US licence in the UK - our daughter, who is a British citizen and passed her test in the UK, but is now an Australian resident - isn't allowed to drive our cars as a named driver when she comes to visit.

    She's allowed to hire a car, but not to borrow one, basically. Go figure.
    • elsien
    • By elsien 7th Jan 18, 4:39 PM
    • 16,521 Posts
    • 41,703 Thanks
    elsien
    I'm sorry your dad is so unwell. Is he well enough to give a power of attorney? If he doesn't have capacity then setting up a new power of attorney isn't possible.
    Last edited by elsien; 07-01-2018 at 4:44 PM.
    All shall be well, and all shall be well, and all manner of things shall be well.

    Pedant alert - it's could have, not could of.
    • Joe Horner
    • By Joe Horner 7th Jan 18, 4:45 PM
    • 4,378 Posts
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    Joe Horner
    Also, if you approach an insurer with power of attorney to make changes they may (quite understandably) become interested in why it's needed and whether it affects his ability to drive.
    • lr1277
    • By lr1277 8th Jan 18, 12:50 AM
    • 551 Posts
    • 316 Thanks
    lr1277
    My family in a relatively fast moving new situation so I am looking at options and ways forward.

    This situation is somewhat moot as my mum thinks that dad won't give permission. Looks like my SIL is hiring a car.

    Will be talking to the lawyer this week about PoA. If not possible, I understand we will have to go to court. A bridge to be crossed.

    Thanks.
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