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  • FIRST POST
    • jgallcash
    • By jgallcash 6th Jan 18, 8:30 PM
    • 607Posts
    • 80Thanks
    jgallcash
    Windows 10 Fresh Install Advice
    • #1
    • 6th Jan 18, 8:30 PM
    Windows 10 Fresh Install Advice 6th Jan 18 at 8:30 PM
    I recently added an SSD to my HP laptop but rather than doing a fresh install at the time I stupidly cloned the hard drive and recovery partition meaning I've drives C (original laptop drive), Drive D (Original recovery partition) Drive E Duplicated original on the SSD and F which is a cloned recovery.

    I want to start from scratch and install windows 10 on the SSD with a recovery partition and then use the original laptop drive just for document storage.

    To try and get this done I created a windows 10 boot USB using the Windows Creation Tool (https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/software-download/windows10)

    Then I changed the boot order in the laptop BIOS settings to boot from USB first. Unfortunately when trying this I just get a plain blue screen with nothing happening.

    What am I doing wrong and how can I get a brand new install of the OS onto this SSD and get rid of the duplicates?

    Thanks in advance
Page 1
    • Debbie Savard
    • By Debbie Savard 6th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    • 380 Posts
    • 329 Thanks
    Debbie Savard
    • #2
    • 6th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Jan 18, 8:32 PM
    What model of HP laptop?
    • jgallcash
    • By jgallcash 6th Jan 18, 9:10 PM
    • 607 Posts
    • 80 Thanks
    jgallcash
    • #3
    • 6th Jan 18, 9:10 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Jan 18, 9:10 PM
    What model of HP laptop?
    Originally posted by Debbie Savard
    Hi there - its an HP 250 g4
    • mart44
    • By mart44 6th Jan 18, 10:51 PM
    • 194 Posts
    • 104 Thanks
    mart44
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 18, 10:51 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 18, 10:51 PM
    I have done a fresh installation of Windows 10 on an HP laptop computer using the Media Creation Tool. To get the computer to boot from the USB drive, it is a case of pressing keyboard F9 a couple of times when the computer is booting up. Then use the keyboard up/down keys to select the USB thumb drive to boot from. Is that the same as you are doing?

    At an early stage of the installation procedure, there is an 'Advanced' option. Once into that, all partitions can be deleted from the C: drive before proceeding with the W.10 installation procedure. On continuing, Windows creates anew all of the partitions it needs for a working OS, so giving the clean installation that you want.

    No need to enter key numbers when asked for (skip the option). The OS should be activated when the installation is complete. Just have your Microsoft account number and e-mail address handy for entering when asked for. However, just a slight worry because the hard drive has been changed. Since the activation depends on the hardware remaining the same, I wonder if you might have to get in touch with Microsoft and explain the situation?
    Error! - Keyboard not attached. Press any key to continue.
    • Neil Jones
    • By Neil Jones 6th Jan 18, 11:00 PM
    • 1,343 Posts
    • 808 Thanks
    Neil Jones
    • #5
    • 6th Jan 18, 11:00 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Jan 18, 11:00 PM
    I wonder if you might have to get in touch with Microsoft and explain the situation?
    No you won't. Windows 10 licences are digital and tied to the board, the hard drive doesn't come into it.
    • flashg67
    • By flashg67 6th Jan 18, 11:02 PM
    • 2,501 Posts
    • 1,638 Thanks
    flashg67
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 11:02 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 11:02 PM
    I'd try re-doing the installation usb - you've done it the same way I have in the past

    I used the fee home edition of EaseUS Partition Master to delete/reclaim the partitions I didn't need on the HP laptop I've just cloned to an SSD, rather than a fresh install
    • emptybox
    • By emptybox 7th Jan 18, 1:13 AM
    • 391 Posts
    • 202 Thanks
    emptybox
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:13 AM
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:13 AM
    The fact that you say the partitions on the SSD are E: and F: show that you are still booting into the Windows on the original HDD.

    All you should have to do is to chage it in the BIOS to boot off the SSD, and then those will become your C: and D: drives, and you can then put what you like on the HDD.
    • EveryWhere
    • By EveryWhere 7th Jan 18, 6:25 AM
    • 352 Posts
    • 151 Thanks
    EveryWhere
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:25 AM
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:25 AM
    Hi there - its an HP 250 g4
    Originally posted by jgallcash
    Post #4 has it covered.
    For more detailed instructions, look here; http://www.expertreviews.co.uk/software/operating-systems/1401617/how-to-clean-install-windows-10-and-create-boot-media/page/0/1

    As mart44 has stated, your Boot override menu key is F9.
    • unforeseen
    • By unforeseen 7th Jan 18, 9:13 AM
    • 2,663 Posts
    • 3,410 Thanks
    unforeseen
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:13 AM
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 9:13 AM
    I've always found that when building a multidisk pc that it is better to only have the disk that the OS is planned for connected during the build process. Windows has a habit of putting stuff on disk 0, when installing even though that may not be the destination disk for the OS.

    It can cause problems later on if for example you remove/replace that disk
    • wongataa
    • By wongataa 7th Jan 18, 9:42 AM
    • 1,337 Posts
    • 786 Thanks
    wongataa
    I've always found that when building a multidisk pc that it is better to only have the disk that the OS is planned for connected during the build process. Windows has a habit of putting stuff on disk 0, when installing even though that may not be the destination disk for the OS.

    It can cause problems later on if for example you remove/replace that disk
    Originally posted by unforeseen
    This definitely. Always only have one hard drive connected when installing Windows.
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