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    • bargainhunterkid
    • By bargainhunterkid 6th Jan 18, 4:26 PM
    • 88Posts
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    bargainhunterkid
    Do I need Grant of Probabte for my Dad's will?
    • #1
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:26 PM
    Do I need Grant of Probabte for my Dad's will? 6th Jan 18 at 4:26 PM
    Please help or offer advice if you can anyone - would be very grateful - my Dad died last week leaving a will. My Mum is the sole executor and main beneficiary with money also being left to some immediate family members (children & grandchildren).

    My Mum has a copy of the will and we've rung the solicitor who holds the original will who said they will send this to us when we send the death certificate.

    Never having done this before I've now had huge panic as been reading about 'grant of probate'. ASsume this is like rubber stamping the will to make sure it's legal but no idea what to do/how to do it/costs as seems can be expensive through solicitor but would worry about getting it wrong if we do it ourselves. DOes everyone have to do this if will is left? PLease help if anyone has done this or knows what next step is. THank you.
Page 1
    • martinthebandit
    • By martinthebandit 6th Jan 18, 4:29 PM
    • 3,518 Posts
    • 6,042 Thanks
    martinthebandit
    • #2
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:29 PM
    • #2
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:29 PM
    I just followed the guidance here

    https://www.gov.uk/wills-probate-inheritance/if-the-person-left-a-will
    Politics -
    from the words Poli, meaning many
    and tics meaning blood sucking parasites


    (thanks to Kinky Friedman (or Larry Hardman) for the quote}
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 6th Jan 18, 4:34 PM
    • 4,270 Posts
    • 3,485 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    • #3
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:34 PM
    • #3
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:34 PM
    Please help or offer advice if you can anyone - would be very grateful - my Dad died last week leaving a will. My Mum is the sole executor and main beneficiary with money also being left to some immediate family members (children & grandchildren).

    My Mum has a copy of the will and we've rung the solicitor who holds the original will who said they will send this to us when we send the death certificate.

    Never having done this before I've now had huge panic as been reading about 'grant of probate'. ASsume this is like rubber stamping the will to make sure it's legal but no idea what to do/how to do it/costs as seems can be expensive through solicitor but would worry about getting it wrong if we do it ourselves. DOes everyone have to do this if will is left? PLease help if anyone has done this or knows what next step is. THank you.
    Originally posted by bargainhunterkid
    Don!!!8217;t panic! It really is not that difficult to do. What is the value of the estate? Is there a property involved? You just need to be methodical and list all the debts and assets then fill in the forms. Many banks and building societies will release funds upon presentation of the death certificate and proof of identity. Plenty of advice here if needed.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 6th Jan 18, 4:38 PM
    • 38,625 Posts
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    Savvy_Sue
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:38 PM
    • #4
    • 6th Jan 18, 4:38 PM
    My Mum has a copy of the will and we've rung the solicitor who holds the original will who said they will send this to us when we send the death certificate.
    Originally posted by bargainhunterkid
    If it's possible to call in and collect the original will, that might be worth while, I'm not sure I'd want the original entrusted to the post so if they're going to do that please check it will be sent signed for.

    If you do go in, don't let them bamboozle you into signing up for them to do the work. It's not something you need to do in a hurry, you can work through everything gradually, and you can help your mum. If you find you DO need help with any particular aspect, you can pay for help with that.

    Never having done this before I've now had huge panic as been reading about 'grant of probate'. ASsume this is like rubber stamping the will to make sure it's legal but no idea what to do/how to do it/costs as seems can be expensive through solicitor but would worry about getting it wrong if we do it ourselves. DOes everyone have to do this if will is left? PLease help if anyone has done this or knows what next step is. THank you.
    Originally posted by bargainhunterkid
    as well as Yorkshireman's questions, are all the grandchildren over 18?
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
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    • bargainhunterkid
    • By bargainhunterkid 6th Jan 18, 10:02 PM
    • 88 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    bargainhunterkid
    • #5
    • 6th Jan 18, 10:02 PM
    • #5
    • 6th Jan 18, 10:02 PM
    Thanks so much for the posts. Just to clarify - is grant of probate something that needs to be done for every will when the person who made it dies, or does it depend on value of estate? Asked a friend who'd been in similar situation & he couldn't remember doing this.

    So far bank/building societies saying they would close account or transfer accounts to my Mum on presentation of death certificate.

    Someone asked about the estate & Estate would be mainly family home which passes to my Mum (thought anything left to my mum would be safe from IHT anyway?) money left to children & grandchildren would be way under the 325,000 IHT threshold.

    But clearly if grant of probate is something we must legally do then obviously would but as right now there so much to take in wondered if grant of probate is essential? Sorry if been rambling thank you
    • Yorkshireman99
    • By Yorkshireman99 6th Jan 18, 10:22 PM
    • 4,270 Posts
    • 3,485 Thanks
    Yorkshireman99
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 10:22 PM
    • #6
    • 6th Jan 18, 10:22 PM
    Thanks so much for the posts. Just to clarify - is grant of probate something that needs to be done for every will when the person who made it dies, or does it depend on value of estate? Asked a friend who'd been in similar situation & he couldn't remember doing this.

    So far bank/building societies saying they would close account or transfer accounts to my Mum on presentation of death certificate.

    Someone asked about the estate & Estate would be mainly family home which passes to my Mum (thought anything left to my mum would be safe from IHT anyway?) money left to children & grandchildren would be way under the 325,000 IHT threshold.

    But clearly if grant of probate is something we must legally do then obviously would but as right now there so much to take in wondered if grant of probate is essential? Sorry if been rambling thank you
    Originally posted by bargainhunterkid
    The house may still have to be included in the value of the estate. Do you know if it was owned as joint tenants or tenants in common? You might read the stickies on this forum first.
    • Savvy_Sue
    • By Savvy_Sue 7th Jan 18, 1:08 AM
    • 38,625 Posts
    • 35,356 Thanks
    Savvy_Sue
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:08 AM
    • #7
    • 7th Jan 18, 1:08 AM
    Generally, if there's a property involved, you need to get the grant of probate in order to remove the name of the deceased from the deeds and get the new ownership correctly registered. It's worth doing this on the first death, IMO, even if it passes automatically to a surviving spouse, because it can save difficulties on the second death - or even earlier than that if surviving spouse wants to sell it.

    If it's a small estate then probably isn't always necessary: some spouses don't bother if either they are sole beneficiary and executor, or if there's no will but they are the only beneficiary. However this can cause problems on the second death, especially if it's no longer a small estate.

    The question about the age of the grandchildren remains: are any of them under 18?
    Still knitting!
    Completed: 1 adult cardigan, 3 baby jumpers, 3 shawls, 1 sweat band, 3 pairs baby bootees,
    1 Wise Man Knitivity figure + 1 sheep, 2 pairs socks, 2 hats 2 balaclavas for seamen, 1 balaclava for myself ...
    Current projects: Poppies, mohair cardigan pattern arrived and going strong!
    • bargainhunterkid
    • By bargainhunterkid 7th Jan 18, 5:50 PM
    • 88 Posts
    • 30 Thanks
    bargainhunterkid
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:50 PM
    • #8
    • 7th Jan 18, 5:50 PM
    Thanks - just replying to your question above - one of the grand children is under 18 - does this change things? THank you
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 7th Jan 18, 6:29 PM
    • 5,108 Posts
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    Keep pedalling
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:29 PM
    • #9
    • 7th Jan 18, 6:29 PM
    Thanks - just replying to your question above - one of the grand children is under 18 - does this change things? THank you
    Originally posted by bargainhunterkid
    Not really, it just means his / her inheritance needs to be held in trust until they reach their 18th birthday. How old are they?
    • bargainhunterkid
    • By bargainhunterkid 7th Jan 18, 7:16 PM
    • 88 Posts
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    bargainhunterkid
    17 & he will be 18 in 6 months time - does this mean the executor can hold on to the money until then & pay out in their 18th Birthday?
    • Keep pedalling
    • By Keep pedalling 7th Jan 18, 7:27 PM
    • 5,108 Posts
    • 5,693 Thanks
    Keep pedalling
    17 & he will be 18 in 6 months time - does this mean the executor can hold on to the money until then & pay out in their 18th Birthday?
    Originally posted by bargainhunterkid
    For such a short period that would be the best option. It gets tricky with young children, in that you have got to find somewhere to invest the money.

    If you are in Scotland however children can inherit money at 16.
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