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  • FIRST POST
    • Thunderchild2015
    • By Thunderchild2015 5th Jan 18, 6:59 PM
    • 13Posts
    • 9Thanks
    Thunderchild2015
    Quitting Work
    • #1
    • 5th Jan 18, 6:59 PM
    Quitting Work 5th Jan 18 at 6:59 PM
    Hey guys

    Was wondering if I could have some general advice regarding my situation, which is as follows. I will keep if brief to make it easier to understand;

    I've been working for a certain finance company whom will remain nameless
    since October, which involves a 50 mile round trip per day. The job is minimum
    Wage, I get treat like dirt by my manager and I'm putting 200-250 petrol in my car per month just to go to work. In fact it's costing me just to keep going there. I once had an informal discussion about this with my boss and his response was "Well you knew where the job was when you took it"

    Anyhow......

    - Last Friday I was involved in a minor accident in my car in the snow. Nothing
    serious, some mild shock, concussion, jarring of the bones etc and after the
    weekend I had to take the day off work to be checked up at the doctor's.

    - Upon inspection the doctor decided to sign me off sick until next Monday (8th) When I rang in to tell my manager I would not be in work he asked me for my car insurance details as proof that I had had an accident!

    - Rather than do nothing for a week I decided to look online for other jobs etc
    near me. I have subsequently been to an interview this morning, they have offered me the position and they want me to start on Tuesday morning.

    Given that I'm only in the first 90 days of my employment am I able to effectively leave my old job on Monday and start my new one on Tuesday?

    I've made my new place aware of my situation and they are happy for me to do this....

    Any advice or opinions would be greatly appreciated

    Many thanks
Page 1
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 5th Jan 18, 7:16 PM
    • 4,676 Posts
    • 7,900 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #2
    • 5th Jan 18, 7:16 PM
    • #2
    • 5th Jan 18, 7:16 PM
    Of course you can't. You have to give notice, and any employer who is happy that you walk out on that is dodgy - they obviously have little regard for the law so why would it only be the case on this issue?

    And actually, I'm struggling to see how your employer has been unreasonable. You did know where the job was when you took it, so what it cost to go to work was your decision - just like everyone else in the world. You had a car accident on Friday and claim to have injuries including concussion - and you left it until Monday to seek medical advice!?

    I suspect that you are going to walk out anyway - it's hardly credible that you don't know what a notice period is, so you just really wanted someone to tell you that it's ok. It isn't. If there are consequences, it will be your own fault.
    • xapprenticex
    • By xapprenticex 5th Jan 18, 7:21 PM
    • 1,461 Posts
    • 1,430 Thanks
    xapprenticex
    • #3
    • 5th Jan 18, 7:21 PM
    • #3
    • 5th Jan 18, 7:21 PM
    Your new place is happy for you to walk out of your current job without notice? I take it they dont want a reference either?

    I wouldnt be surprised if the new company kick you out without notice (of not wanting you there) on the 23rd month.

    I know you want to leave desperately but do it the right way, your NEXT job may require a reference.
    • keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • By keepcalmandstayoutofdebt 5th Jan 18, 7:37 PM
    • 3,241 Posts
    • 1,699 Thanks
    keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    • #4
    • 5th Jan 18, 7:37 PM
    • #4
    • 5th Jan 18, 7:37 PM
    It's been said before - just be wary of new employer allowing you to do this, they would probably expect notice themselves - I'd hate for them to use it as a future hold over you. Requiring someone to start immediately is never a glowing happy sign.

    I'd not want to tell my potential new employer what happened to me recently, jokes and anger aside it would actually be awful for it to come out in more ways then one, only today I got paperwork through which states the old line of references required after the verbal conversation offering and initial email sent which didn't mention references until now - though in fairness no where to write them down! (...I can let you know how it pans out)

    Be careful if it is the finance industry you are leaving. Definately wouldn't vanish from old employer without talking and trying to smooth it over.
    "If you are caught in a rainstorm, once you accept that you'll receive a soaking, the only thing left to do is enjoy the walk"
    • Thunderchild2015
    • By Thunderchild2015 5th Jan 18, 7:48 PM
    • 13 Posts
    • 9 Thanks
    Thunderchild2015
    • #5
    • 5th Jan 18, 7:48 PM
    • #5
    • 5th Jan 18, 7:48 PM

    Be careful if it is the finance industry you are leaving. Definately wouldn't vanish from old employer without talking and trying to smooth it over.
    Originally posted by keepcalmandstayoutofdebt
    It's vehicle finance - The firm I work for is notoriously dodgy and known for having a huge turnover of people. Over 60 people have started in the last 2 months that I've been present, and I can think of 4 that still work there.....

    The question I'm really asking here, is if I can give notice to leave with immediate effect.

    I'm under the impression that within 3 months you only need to give 24 hours notice, as would the employer if they wished to terminate me
    • 1886
    • By 1886 5th Jan 18, 8:05 PM
    • 466 Posts
    • 414 Thanks
    1886
    • #6
    • 5th Jan 18, 8:05 PM
    • #6
    • 5th Jan 18, 8:05 PM
    Of course you can't. You have to give notice, and any employer who is happy that you walk out on that is dodgy - they obviously have little regard for the law so why would it only be the case on this issue?

    And actually, I'm struggling to see how your employer has been unreasonable. You did know where the job was when you took it, so what it cost to go to work was your decision - just like everyone else in the world. You had a car accident on Friday and claim to have injuries including concussion - and you left it until Monday to seek medical advice!?

    I suspect that you are going to walk out anyway - it's hardly credible that you don't know what a notice period is, so you just really wanted someone to tell you that it's ok. It isn't. If there are consequences, it will be your own fault.
    Originally posted by sangie595
    Nobody has to do anything. They may choose to give notice but they don't have to.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 5th Jan 18, 8:53 PM
    • 4,676 Posts
    • 7,900 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #7
    • 5th Jan 18, 8:53 PM
    • #7
    • 5th Jan 18, 8:53 PM
    Nobody has to do anything. They may choose to give notice but they don't have to.
    Originally posted by 1886
    Yes they do. It's the law! Whether there are consequences when they break the law is another matter. And if there are, then it's their own fault.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 5th Jan 18, 8:58 PM
    • 4,676 Posts
    • 7,900 Thanks
    sangie595
    • #8
    • 5th Jan 18, 8:58 PM
    • #8
    • 5th Jan 18, 8:58 PM
    It's vehicle finance - The firm I work for is notoriously dodgy and known for having a huge turnover of people. Over 60 people have started in the last 2 months that I've been present, and I can think of 4 that still work there.....

    The question I'm really asking here, is if I can give notice to leave with immediate effect.

    I'm under the impression that within 3 months you only need to give 24 hours notice, as would the employer if they wished to terminate me
    Originally posted by Thunderchild2015
    Where did you get that impression? It's wrong. You must either give one week, or whatever is in your contract. You had the answer. You must give notice. If you don't, and it gets you into trouble, you only have yourself to blame. And if your new employer is so sanguine that toy are going to, then when they dump on you, toy will also only have yourself to blame.
    • Fireflyaway
    • By Fireflyaway 6th Jan 18, 6:49 PM
    • 1,819 Posts
    • 1,969 Thanks
    Fireflyaway
    • #9
    • 6th Jan 18, 6:49 PM
    • #9
    • 6th Jan 18, 6:49 PM
    Of course no employer can force you to stay. However there must be a notice period mentioned in your contract? If you don't give enough notice you would be in breach of contract. Having said that, it doesn't sound like you and your employer get along. They may actually be happy you are leaving.
    • demiruss
    • By demiruss 6th Jan 18, 6:53 PM
    • 56 Posts
    • 27 Thanks
    demiruss
    I work somewhere with a very high turnover of staff and they've left without giving notice. I don't know if they had deductions in their salary but can guarantee they won't get a good reference. If your new job is secure and doesn't depend on 'satisfactory references' then you could go (risking future employment), but you're likely to still be in a probation period and only need to give 1 week, could the new employer could wait?
    • Nothanks
    • By Nothanks 7th Jan 18, 4:38 PM
    • 123 Posts
    • 135 Thanks
    Nothanks
    You can always talk to the current employer and agree between you to waive your notice period. They'll likely say yes if they're as you describe, and you've done the right thing and the more robust thing legally.
    Anything I post is solely MY OPINION. It never constitutes legal, financial or collective bargaining advice. I may tell you based on information given how I might approach an employment dispute case, but you should always seek advice from your own Union representative. If you don't have one, get one!
    • joeypesci
    • By joeypesci 7th Jan 18, 9:04 PM
    • 508 Posts
    • 184 Thanks
    joeypesci
    The current company, from what I remember but this from over 10 years ago so the law may have changed, but a company you work for, when calling in sick, can't ask you to provide proof. They can ask you "What is wrong? When you think you are going to be back?" and that's pretty much it. They can't ask for your insurance details to check.

    I'd leave them as soon as possible.
    • sangie595
    • By sangie595 7th Jan 18, 9:32 PM
    • 4,676 Posts
    • 7,900 Thanks
    sangie595
    The current company, from what I remember but this from over 10 years ago so the law may have changed, but a company you work for, when calling in sick, can't ask you to provide proof. They can ask you "What is wrong? When you think you are going to be back?" and that's pretty much it. They can't ask for your insurance details to check.

    I'd leave them as soon as possible.
    Originally posted by joeypesci
    No, the law hasn't changed. That was never correct! An employer has always been able to interrogate your sickness record, and can withhold SSP or sick pay if they are not satisfied with your evidence. Then it is up to you to take legal action if they do.
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