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  • FIRST POST
    • bumblebeany
    • By bumblebeany 1st Jan 18, 5:39 PM
    • 62Posts
    • 1,118Thanks
    bumblebeany
    Minimise plastic waste 2018. China refuses our refuse.
    • #1
    • 1st Jan 18, 5:39 PM
    Minimise plastic waste 2018. China refuses our refuse. 1st Jan 18 at 5:39 PM
    I have tried to reduce plastic waste over the years, but it has always been easy to slip back into old habits, especially when plastic is so ubiquitous.

    Now that China are going to refuse our refuse for recycling there will be bound to be a knock on effect to consumers. In theory you would hope that this could be an impetus for manufacturers to change their packaging, what seems more likely to happen in the short term is that fines in the way of plastic taxes will be passed onto consumers.

    Thought it might be good to put tips, hints etc on ways to reduce waste plus rants you have sent to manufacturers/politicians In one place, I know it pops up on other threads.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-42455378
Page 4
    • purpleivy
    • By purpleivy 12th Jan 18, 10:12 PM
    • 3,393 Posts
    • 20,734 Thanks
    purpleivy
    I have overlocked together some 100% crushed cotton winceyette fabric and this makes nice make up removing pads. I put them in a laundry net then when there are a few I wash them in the washing machine.


    Blimey, that's a REALLY useful tip - have googled them and they sound really interesting. And I know several people I'll be sending the link to as well...



    this is brilliant - I shall have a ferret around in my fabric and see what I've got that would work!




    Just be aware that fleece fabrics, and microfibres of all kinds, are possibly the single worst pollutant ever unleashed on the planet... :'( If you have it, try to find ways of reducing how often it gets washed - spot-clean, damp-sponging, etc,. will all work on fleecy jackets and tops to extend the period between washes, hanging them in the bathroom inside-out on a hanger, misting the armpits with vodka, all help too - hey, it works on the opera costumes worn night after night by different people, usually over just skin, under hot lighting, in physically demanding situations for hours at a time, and which cannot ever be washed!

    I'm using dishcloth cotton to crochet reusable face pads, but cotton isn't exactly sound either, so I'm on the look-out for organic, pesticide-free cotton yarn to use... I'm lucky that I've got a huge stash of assorted stuff like yarn and fabric so can get away with no buying more while I try to source better alternatives, but it shocks me to find how much I had been reliant on buying microfibre and cotton, not realising the environmental impact...
    Originally posted by Laura_Elsewhere
    "Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad"
    Trying not to waste food!
    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 14th Jan 18, 7:31 AM
    • 15,859 Posts
    • 43,891 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    I can see that there are various Plastic Free local Facebook groups starting up now - duly joined my local one.

    So worth people checking to see if one has started near them yet. There's obviously quite a way to go yet with some people - supermarket trip yesterday was distinctly depressing at how much plastic wrapping I simply am not able to avoid buying yet (as the stuff has been pre-wrapped in it). But - whilst I'm carefully picking up a bunch of loose bananas instead of a pre-wrapped bunch - I noticed a man right by me picking up another bunch of loose bananas and then taking a plastic bag to put them in. Whilst there are people like that around - then that's a very good reason we need to persuade supermarkets not to have plastic bags at all.
    *******************
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 14th Jan 18, 8:05 AM
    • 3,335 Posts
    • 7,903 Thanks
    jackyann
    Can I ask if any of you knowledgeable people know how environmentally friendly silicone bags are?

    I have used cloth bags that I wash out over many years for shopping. I re-use plastic stuff a lot, but still have a long way to go! I make my own stock and soups and freeze them in plastic bags from Lakeland that are strong with a good seal. Where appropriate, I do wash out and re-use them. DH found some silicone bags on line that we thought would be stronger and longer lasting. Any thoughts?
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 14th Jan 18, 9:10 AM
    • 3,190 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    tori.k
    Like anything there are pros and cons, it highly depends on what your looking for if looking to remove BPA and other chemicals, silicone is ideal as it's inert, it's non recyclable in normal household recycling, yet the is a few private companies that do, it's not a circular product it won't biodegrade.but wears much better and longer than other conventional oil based plastics.
    It a sensible option in the case of removing single use plastic they would last much longer than re- washing bags.
    The frugal part of me would suggest reusing day to day available packaging, old butter tubs, glass jars from your regular recycling. But know a lot of people avoid BPA or are limited on freezer space, so any reusable product is better than a single use item
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    • gemini12
    • By gemini12 14th Jan 18, 12:00 PM
    • 343 Posts
    • 2,154 Thanks
    gemini12
    I have a question if anyone here works in a supermarket. Why if I buy a chicken do the cashiers insist on putting it in a seperate plastic bag unless I notice and stop them? It really bugs me as I dont want or need more plastic in my bin
    Make 10 a day challenge May. 81.40/310
    Total for 2013 858.85/1060
    • sazzlebgood?
    • By sazzlebgood? 14th Jan 18, 5:09 PM
    • 90 Posts
    • 209 Thanks
    sazzlebgood?
    We trying out veg and fruit boxes at the moment to try and eliminate plastic although the toms did have a plastic cover. Really pleased with it and the best thing is the company allow you to have a list of things not to ever send you so cuts down on waste too. Its a shame they don't do milk in a glass bottle although my OH and DD1 would be fighting over the creamy bit. I used to love that bit of the milk unless the birds got to it first.
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 14th Jan 18, 11:29 PM
    • 3,190 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    tori.k
    Gemini12 it will be because of the risk of cross contamination especially with chicken being high in campylobacter and salmonella bacteria.
    I admit I don't have my local veg box over the winter months, I already grow a few bits like perpetual spinach and risk mutiny at the dinner table with to much green stuff so tend to run the freezer out of stuff I've frozen over the summer months. It will be tinned tomatoes unto June.
    I'm looking forward to purple sprouting broccoli from next month.
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    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 16th Jan 18, 7:59 AM
    • 3,335 Posts
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    jackyann
    Well, I have taken the plunge and bought 4 x 1 litre silicone bags from @ma*on for 15.99(prime so no postage). I reckon to get 2 uses from each Lakeland plastic pouch (5.99 for 20) so they will really have to last well to make it worthwhile financially - 25-30 uses. I know that's not the only reason for using them, and environmentally, I hope it's a lot more than that.
    Thinking of sandwiches, Lakeland used to do a nice re-usable triangle container for sandwiches, but can't see it now. I gave mine away when I left work.
    • gemini12
    • By gemini12 16th Jan 18, 8:10 AM
    • 343 Posts
    • 2,154 Thanks
    gemini12
    Thamks Tori K I understand the need to avoid cross contamination but please ask if I want a bag as I always have umpteen washable bags with me to keep stuff separate and do not need extraneous plastic bags.
    Last edited by gemini12; 16-01-2018 at 8:13 AM.
    Make 10 a day challenge May. 81.40/310
    Total for 2013 858.85/1060
    • Well Preserved
    • By Well Preserved 17th Jan 18, 6:48 PM
    • 183 Posts
    • 1,064 Thanks
    Well Preserved
    I can!!!8217;t help but wonder if half the problem in supermarkets is the barcodes. I must admit we prefer the shop & scan option in our local Mr T!!!8217;s (though we are gradually reducing what we buy there). The scan bit means you have to put the barcode sticker on something, so usually end up putting loose things in a bag. We have no greengrocer in the town - just an occasional stall at the so-called market but it!!!8217;s gone by the time people finish work. If I shop at Aldi!!!8217;s which is nearer everything is pre-wrapped. I managed to get a few loose items through in Lidl!!!8217;s but didn!!!8217;t fancy doing cherry tomatoes that way !!!55357;!!!56841; oh and I bought loose mushrooms in T!!!8217;s, used a brown paper bag & felt good - until I realised it had a cellophane strip! There don!!!8217;t seem to be any simple solutions.
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 17th Jan 18, 9:45 PM
    • 3,190 Posts
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    tori.k
    Could you not just put the sticker on a piece of paper and loose box/ reusable bags your items.
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    • Well Preserved
    • By Well Preserved 17th Jan 18, 10:10 PM
    • 183 Posts
    • 1,064 Thanks
    Well Preserved
    Possibly, though we do have quite a few, and of course the items have to be weighed (back to the cherry tomatoes!) I!!!8217;m working on it but it doesn!!!8217;t seem straightforward! Sometimes I think it would be simpler just to use the plastic bag provided & recycle it for picking up what the neighbours!!!8217; cats leave in the garden!
    • tori.k
    • By tori.k 18th Jan 18, 5:10 AM
    • 3,190 Posts
    • 8,092 Thanks
    tori.k
    If your handy then reusable produce bags can easily be made from old net curtain or mesh material or picked up on Etsy or eBay cheaply if sewing is not your thing.
    We had a dog bog dug into the garden with our old jack, it must be frustrating when it's other people's pets you have to deal with.short of returning it back to the neighbours with the Fick of a shovel you have no recourse but to clean it up, probably a good job I live a bit out in the sticks I'm a cantankerous old biddy and that would get up my nose
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    • moneyistooshorttomention
    • By moneyistooshorttomention 18th Jan 18, 7:50 AM
    • 15,859 Posts
    • 43,891 Thanks
    moneyistooshorttomention
    Well, I have taken the plunge and bought 4 x 1 litre silicone bags from @ma*on for 15.99(prime so no postage). I reckon to get 2 uses from each Lakeland plastic pouch (5.99 for 20) so they will really have to last well to make it worthwhile financially - 25-30 uses. I know that's not the only reason for using them, and environmentally, I hope it's a lot more than that.
    Thinking of sandwiches, Lakeland used to do a nice re-usable triangle container for sandwiches, but can't see it now. I gave mine away when I left work.
    Originally posted by jackyann
    There's a suitable lunch container on www.anythingbutplastic.co.uk.

    It's made of metal.
    *******************
    • maryb
    • By maryb 20th Jan 18, 1:34 PM
    • 3,746 Posts
    • 46,124 Thanks
    maryb
    I've been reading a blog which is quite informative - Treading My Own Path. She's based in Oz but a lot of it is applicable to the UK. She is also into zero waste.

    I've been ruminating quite a lot over the last couple of weeks over how feasible it is to go extreme plastic free and I very soon realised I would draw the line at electric toothbrush heads. They do a much better job than any manual toothbrush, plastic or bamboo, and I want to keep my teeth well into old age.

    I went onto our local council website and checked their policy w/r to plastic recycling. I already knew they collected a lot more than most other councils and it seems that is because they ship the low grade stuff off for incineration.

    I can't decide what to think about this. Incineration keeps it out of the sea and out of landfill and as long as they have decent filters to prevent toxins being released into the atmosphere, then you could just look on it as oil having another go around before it's burned to produce energy.

    However, oil is still a finite resource so I think my conclusion is it's always greener to reduce wasteful consumption but I'm not going to beat myself up because I can't eliminate it from my life unless I use up just as much oil travelling around to buy from farm shops etc.

    I tend to split my shop between Leedle and Rose Waite's anyway. So I'll get carrots and broccoli in W's because they are unwrapped and about the same price, but celeriac and cucumber are unwrapped in Leedle's so they'll be getting my custom. We also have street stalls selling fruit and veg and they are happy to put stuff straight into a cloth bag. So if they have a stainless steel bowl of tomatoes I will buy those in preference to a plastic punnet but if a punnet is all that is available - so be it and I'll recycle it

    Small decisions. I am only one person and I can only do what one person can do. But I will do that much
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
    • jackyann
    • By jackyann 21st Jan 18, 11:31 AM
    • 3,335 Posts
    • 7,903 Thanks
    jackyann
    I buy nearly all my fruit & veg at a market or our fantastic local greengrocer. However, sometimes I shop at a supermarket, and I take my net bags for the loose fruit & veg.The sticker usually goes on them - if it won't stick, I put it on the back of my shopping list and hand it over.

    We have stopped using plastic bin liners (we remembered first buying them in the 70s, so channelled our 60s selves!). We do have a daily newspaper, so it is easy to line the bin, then have some more handy for wrapping anything a bit sticky - but as we recycle avidly, it really is mostly plastic and other dry oddments.

    Of course, daily newspapers are less popular than they used to be, and I understand the desire to cut down on paper waste. But for the time being, we like our paper, and are putting it to good use.
    • maryb
    • By maryb 21st Jan 18, 9:05 PM
    • 3,746 Posts
    • 46,124 Thanks
    maryb
    I usually put out about three or four carrier bag size bin liners of non recyclable rubbish in a fortnight. If I didn't use those I would have to use a bigger rubbish bag to line the bin as that is what our council insists on, and that tends to be thicker plastic. So I can't really reduce that
    It doesn't matter if you are a glass half full or half empty sort of person. Keep it topped up! Cheers!
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